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#1 abollmeyer

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 08:25 PM

I've been on and off of this forum for 7 years now. This is my third major attempt to quit in that period. I still recognize a few people's names, but by and large, I'm sure the community has changed quite a bit in that time. I'm sure I have too. 

 

For at least the third time in my life, I am trying to quit smoking. I find that there's always an excuse to give in to the urge. Not a reason that would make sense to a sane person mind you, just an excuse that I can use to validate a habit that will eventually kill me. 

 

I know all the reasons why I should quit. I've followed the advice in the forums, watched YouTube videos on the health effects, made my list of reasons why I should quit, planned my quits, etc. Yet I always find a reason to fail.

 

I stopped smoking again last Friday. So 5 days in. I've noticed that I feel nothing like I did last time I quit for this long. Much worse in fact. Last time, the nicotine withdrawals were far less intense. I mean, it sucked for the first couple of days pretty bad, but then eased up so quickly that I was surprised. I pretty much laid around this weekend watching football to get through the first few days. Quitting is easy when you can be lazy! Now it's halfway through the week and I feel like I should be up and about doing things. I'm not really a lazy person and I find it frustrating sitting around all day just so I don't smoke.

 

So today I went outside to do some yard work. It didn't take long for me to start with the excuses. "I hope I run out of gas so I can go to the gas station!" "Need more lawn bags- there's 3 gas stations on the way!"

 

I know how stupid this all sounds. But I also know how true it can be if I give in to it. So for now, I'll just have to be out of gas and have my wife pick up some lawn bags on her way home. 

 

I think the feelings of uselessness are the worst. I've never had this type of experience in previous quit attempts. After day 4 or so, I was back to my normal self- no fogginess at all. Now I'm forgetting everything, fighting through a haze, and just generally hating life for the moment. I plan on switching jobs at the end of the month (no work 'til then), so I guess I'm putting a lot of pressure on myself too. 

 

Has anyone else had multiple quit attempts that seemed like they were on opposite ends of the spectrum? 

 


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There's no going back now. Smoke-free since 10/6/17.

-Adam
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#2 Jillar

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 08:54 PM

Hi aboll, wow looks like you've been at this quitting thing a longggg time! From what I seen here the short answer to your question is yes, each quit is different. I've only tried once before and it wasn't really trying because I wasn't ready to quit, I was only quitting for everyone else. But I did Chantix and quit for 3 weeks on it then went right back to smoking as soon as I stopped. So I'm not sure if any symptoms I had were from the quit or from the Chantix. I can tell you that the older we get the harder it is to recover from pretty much everything and smoking is no different. We've done a lot of damage to our bodies and it needs every ounce of energy we have to start to fix what we did to it. That's the way I looked at it and I had a hard first few months too :( So my advice to you would be to be selfish and allow your body to heal. Check in here every day to at the very least NOPE and do that for your first solid year. And please post an SOS if you have even the slightest feeling that you may cave to a crave and I promise you our members will come to help talk you off the cliff. So welcome to the Smoke Busters class of 2017 :)
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Things began to get better when I realized I would remain quit even if things never got any better.

Christian99 15 Years Quit

We say here that it is better to be a nonsmoker with the occasional desire to smoke than a smoker with the constant desire to quit. Marciem
Being successful doesn't mean that you'll never GET to smoke again. It means that you'll never HAVE to smoke again.


#3 Frank

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 09:13 PM

Welcome back abollmeyer.  Refresh your memory and reinforce your commitment by reading around here. It has helped everyone you see quit.

 

All the best !


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Nov 6, 2011 I decided " I had enough with this sh*t "

I quit because I just got tired of the life under a rock, dark and with not enough air to breathe waiting for the day to get crushed!

Alcohol to a quit is like Kryptonite to Superman

Stop, Think and then React. Not React,Stop and then Think

Practice does not make it perfect, makes it permanent. Practice the right things!

Quitting is by far the best decision for the rest of your life.

If a Doctor gives you 6 months to live, would you start living after the first three? Quit now!

" I am a puff away form a pack a day"

Once you stop puffing or having Nicotine in any form, then and only then your symptoms will stop.

I quit with a frozen turkey. Once I felt comfortable with my quit,  I ate it.

Life is such a good teacher, that if you don't learn the lesson it will repeat it to you.

 

 

 


#4 Palm109

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 09:14 PM

Aboll here's to 5 days,  heading on to the rest of your life

you have been there, you have done this, and you know what to do.

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#5 cvold

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 10:13 PM

I can't tell you if a year from now that I'll be smoking. What I do know is that today I will "not" put nicotine in my body. I will not inhale poisons into my lungs. I will not pay 9.00 for something that does nothing to enhance my precious day. I will endure cravings, knowing that they won't dominate all my time. Each day is a gift and I am responsible to get all I can out of each one, this is why I chose not to smoke today and I'm already committed for tomorrow. Quits are chances, opportunities to get it right. I pledge to NOPE today with all the people here and I am thankful. Peace
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Always remember: you are not going
through this because you quit. You are going through this because you smoked...

Quit smoking; August 16, 2017

#6 breath

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 11:05 PM

Can you tell your self you wont be smoking tomorrow?

Nope

repeat

 

 

stop the misery mate!


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Relapse is like peeling an onion. TEARS!
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it"
 
George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950}
 
NOPE stands for Not One Puff EVER....
 
It does not stand for......
 
Not One Puff EXCEPT...
 
The minimum requirement is maximum commitment....to NOPE
 
It takes many good decisions to make a good quit, and  only one bad one to lose it.

 

Quit 2nd October 2001.


#7 Lin-quitting

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 11:52 PM

Welcome aboll. I would suggest you keep reading on here, anytime you feel like just laying around and being lazy you need to be on here reading at the same time. Take smoking off the table as an option - know in your mind and heart that the only way to succeed is to just not smoke no matter what, no matter how bad you feel or what symptoms appear. You simply will not smoke. You have quit and that is that.

 

And look around at all the success stories on here. We are all no different than you. Tell yourself that if all these other people can do it then so can I!


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    image.png?base_img=6&size=0&date_yr=2017

 

               

                  "I didn't come this far to only come this far."

 

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I want my life back. I WANT MY LIFE BACK!

There is no try, there is only do. Failure is not an option.

Another proud member of the 2017 Smokebusters team.


#8 garrym

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 12:09 AM

If the picture on your post is currently you, stop while you are this young. It took me 30 plus years to give cigs up for the last time. You want to quit so just commit and get it done. You have done it before and you just got to make it stick. I wish you best and hope to follow your success.


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#9 Lust4Life

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 01:19 AM

Hi & welcome back to the board. If sitting around all day helps you not smoke--then sit around all day we you can. Make your quit priority #1. No excuses. Be selfish and put other stuff on hold. Pledge N O P E everyday. Get it done once & for all!
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KMQ since September 26, 2016.  One N O P E at a time.  :grin: 


#10 beazel

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 12:06 PM

Glad you're back abollmeyer!

 

I've had many quits, but this is by far the worst.

 

I, too, always waited for "the big excuse".

 

It's not worth it.

 

I go one day at a time - if I look too far ahead, it freaks me out.

 

Simple, (but not easy).......Don't Smoke.

 

You can do this - let's help each other!

 

KTQ


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2iijyuf.pngYoung Pharte     

 

QSMB - "The Wind Beneath My Wings"

image.png?base_img=6&size=0&date_yr=2017 smileys-waving-606884.gif

 on the other side of fear lies freedom

 

In the world of addiction, we leave "normal" behind.  - Mike Piano  

Would be a shame for a second's weakness to undo all this hard work. - sgraye

Life's too short, don't make it shorter. - Jess 

 

                                                       

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                      

 

 

 


#11 Gigi74

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 06:54 PM

Hi, aboll! Welcome back to the site and as for not feeling the same (worse) than your previous attempted quits, you'll guard and protect your quit more fervently this time around. I'd had other attempts in the past and would just give myself an excuse to smoke too.

 

The difference now is that I just know in those tough moments I have to have a plan. I try very hard not to put myself in situations where it would be easy or too tempting to smoke. I think we have to give ourselves a while to go through a lot of seasonal and emotional adjustment to not smoking.

 

Truth be told, I don't know if smoking will 100% ever leave my mind. It really may just be the odd moment's desire, but I've dealt with the fact that it may never go away. I'm ok with that and just know that I have to fight down that demon whenever it shows it's head. Maybe there will come a day when I feel or think differently and if that's so, then hey, that'll be a pleasant surprise. I got confident and cocky in my last quit and pulled the whole "I can have just one" thing. Nope. 

 

We're former smokers not never smokers. There's a difference there. We have to stay vigilant for some time to keep and protect our quits. 

 

Namaste. KTQ. 

- Knoxville Girl


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We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.

Aristotle


#12 Faith

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 11:28 PM

I found with each quit it got harder.

You are at a week now so hope things are looking up 😀

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#13 lab rat

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 09:54 PM

Congrats on your quit aboll.
you don't need a solid plan or a reason yet, just trust that when you commit to NOPE, every moment will bring you more peace and pride in having kept your quit. It's just harder to see this truth in the beginning.
Also reflect on your relapses before - I realise now that I couldn't have just one cigarette on a night out. It eventually meant all of them.
KTQ

#14 abollmeyer

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 04:43 PM

Never responded, but I appreciate everyone's advice and experiences. It's good to know that others are/were in similar positions.

After a week and a half, the withdrawal cravings are gone, but the long-term "I need to smoke" cravings are still there (which really sucks). I'm feeling more like myself now, which is good. But the thoughts of smoking are all day long.

The constant temptation sucks, but then I feel how scorched my throat is from 15 years of smoking. I feel the little hairs on my lungs moving, which is so weird that a normal body function can feel weird. Just waiting on the day when I'm not constantly possessed with thoughts of smoking.

Wish I could be that guy that says it's easy, but sadly it's not.

There's no going back now. Smoke-free since 10/6/17.

-Adam
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#15 Lin-quitting

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 05:22 PM

No, it's not easy now, today.....but if you will tough it out it will get easy. And the rewards will be worth it.


    image.png?base_img=6&size=0&date_yr=2017

 

               

                  "I didn't come this far to only come this far."

 

30ksjlf.jpg

 

I want my life back. I WANT MY LIFE BACK!

There is no try, there is only do. Failure is not an option.

Another proud member of the 2017 Smokebusters team.





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