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End of day 3 but feeling confused.


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#1 Sparkle11

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 06:20 PM

Hi all. I posted a post about Champix & have received some great replys & help. However, I'm also on another quit smoking site & today I received a comment that has made me uneasy. I'm on evening 3 of quitting. It basically said that from tomorrow the nicotine should be out of my system but the 'real mental and emotional battle' will begin. I'm trying to put this comment to the back of my mind but it's worrying me. Hopefully Champix will ease the mental battle & to be honest I hope to feel better not worse. As I remember the phrase on here. Smoking is not an option. This is very encouraging. Any advice would be helpful. I've already changed my routine to avoid triggers so I feel I'm doing well. This comment from the other site has left me feeling a little scared rather than making me feel more determined. Almost like tomorrow is D day! Lol
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#2 JimHannoonen

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 06:35 PM

Don't over-think it. Yes, it's going to suck for the next few months. Did you think that you could just stop smoking and then after 3 days you would feel fine?

You poisoned your body for a number of years and it's going to take a while to clean it up.

But regardless of how bad it's going to suck, you made a commitment to quit smoking and you need to stick with that, end of story.
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#3 MissyCat

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 06:40 PM

Hi Sparkle,
You are doing awesome. This quitting thing can only be done one day at a time. Some struggle terribly, others, not so much. Take smoking off the table, it is no longer an option. Pledge nope daily and commit to your quit. ..,you will be fine.
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#4 putnaminn

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 09:23 PM

Oh Sparkle try not to fret.  There are many aspects of quitting this awful addiction. You are going to have bad days and good days all mixed in.  It has been my experience with the use of Chantix that it helps tremendously. It is not going to keep you from feeling all the ups and downs. It helps keep them doable.

 

Sparkle I have to ask, are you reading in Joel's Library, are you watching his tapes, are you educating your mind to what we all go through when we quit.  If not I advise that you do so. Having a better understanding of what you can expect makes you better able to handle situations when they come on.

 

Trust me, everyone of us have gone through what you are going through and about to go through. You've got this.

 

Many on this site have explained the weeks as follows: 1 st week is Hell Week,  2 nd week is Heck Week, and the 3 rd week is WTF Week.  We all have fought through them and lived to tell about them.  You can do this. !!!  Keep close to the board, post often and read and re-read everything you can about this addiction. We are all here for you. :)


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#5 green meenie

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 11:39 PM

I think the information you got from the other site was that yes, in fact the nicotine will be out of your body around day 3 or 4 but the much lager battle is re-adjusting your brain to live life as a non smoker. Think of it this way; when you smoked, you smoked because of certain things in your life that you got used to as a smoker right?

You know, wake up - have a smoke. Have a morning coffee - have a smoke, drive to work - have a smoke.Stressful moment at work - have a smoke ...... you get the idea. Now, as a non-smoker you have to get used to not lighting up every time one of those daily life events happens. That's a lot of readjustment for your brain to go through, It takes a while and it's not easy as your natural inclination will be to smoke rather than to learn how to get through those situations without smoking.

But, you must readjust your thinking in order to remain quit for life. It's a process we all have to go though. Look around here and take note of the people who have months or even years of quit under their belts. They ALL had to go through this same adjustment in their thinking. It's the same for you so be determined and just do it :) You will be that much better off once you truly believe that smoking offers you nothing positive!


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#6 Lin-quitting

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 12:04 AM

My rough and vague understanding Sparkle is that we have literally rewired our brains with our addiction, and it will take time to rewire them back to normal. That's all. Some people have an easier time with the process, and some find it more difficult. For some people it is a quicker process, and others take longer.

 

My advice to you would be (1) Try not to fret about it, just keep on taking it all a day at a time, with your mantra being "smoking is no longer an option in my life, no matter what." You will have better days and worse ones. You will find ways to get through the worse ones. and (2) start reading everything you can about quitting. The Newbie Section on here is an excellent start. We have to be educated and informed about the addiction in order to overcome it.

 

In my experience the Chantix definitely "smoothed the edges" off my quit and made it easier, as it should for you too.

 

Many people don't make it past the first day, and here you are on day 3! That is something to be proud of. Keep going! For your life!


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#7 Eric

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 12:18 AM

  I get what the person was saying to you, but I can see how the wording of the comment could have you feeling uneasy.

 

   The truth is though that the physical aspect of quitting smoking does play the smallest part time wise. Yes, within roughly 72 hours almost all nicotine will be out of the bloodstream. This is when withdrawal usually starts to peak and then begins to subside. After about 10-14 days, physical withdrawal will usually have passed. 

 

  But quitting smoking is more than getting passed physical withdrawal. Cigarettes have been so deeply intertwined into our lives that nicotine addiction has created a very real psychological aspect to it that we must also deal with. 

 

  Whether we were celebrating life, trying to get through the bad times, or even just the mundane times, the cigarette was always there with us. This has caused many association triggers that we must now re learn to experience without the cigarette. This also goes for our emotions. We must learn to experience them as us, not nicotine us.

 

   We must also learn and understand some of the stronger association triggers such as stress and smoking, and understand that the very real physiological reaction between stress and accelerated nicotine withdrawal caused a very real psychological belief in the cigarette as a smoker. A belief that smoking relieved stress, when in reality it only relieved the accelerated nicotine withdrawal due to stress (which is an acidic producing event, washed the alkaloid nicotine out of the bloodstream at an accelerated rate.

 

  Why is it important to understand this even after we quit smoking? Because even when we first quit and change the behavior, the mind still has those beliefs built on the fallacy of lies that this addiction created. The unconscious mind still needs time to break the association, so we need to consciously over ride this seeming autonomous impulse with the conscious mind with knowledge.   

 

  As has already been said, read, watch, and learn about this addiction, because the biggest obstacle to freeing ourselves from this addiction is not nicotine, it is ourselves, our beliefs, which form our attitudes. When you remove the fear that can often times come with quitting smoking and learning to live life after quitting, quitting can become so much easier.

 

  Knowledge and understanding may not take away craves, thoughts, or urges to smoke if they do arise, but it can change how you respond to them, rather than merely being reduced to being a reaction to them. 

 

  And understand that you will have good days and bad days, because before you quit smoking life happened, and after you quit smoking, life happens. I still have bad days, and have had some pretty terrible ones, but they have nothing to do with quitting. It's just the Yin and Yang of life. 

 

  Also, there is nothing wrong with trying to avoid certain triggers for a while, such as drinking alcohol or hanging with smoking friends. Just be careful that you're not trying to avoid everything and for a prolonged time frame, because at some point you're going to have to confront your triggers to fully live your life after quitting. And often times the anticipation of what may happen when faced with a certain person, place, or situation is far more scary than the actuality of it, because if there is one thing our imagination is, it's infinite.

 

  Just take it one day at a time and remember to NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF, and you will be fine.

 

Eric 


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“Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all of the barriers within yourself that you have built against it.”~Rumi

#8 Eric

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 12:39 AM

Also, if it make you feel better my in-laws are in town and staying at my house, so I'm having a bad day :shock:  I'm just joking!......Kinda.....sorta.....maybe :mrgreen:


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“Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all of the barriers within yourself that you have built against it.”~Rumi

#9 giveintowin

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 01:00 AM

You've got good advice here. I can't add anything to it but is there any reason that you couldn't ask the person what they meant?
Only they can really tell you what they meant.

Also I tended to worry when I was early quit about things I didn't need to worry about. No matter how you feel in the beginning if you just don't smoke you will eventually feel back to yourself again.
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Quit date Thursday 8th June. 2017, 10.10am AEDT.

 

It is a relief to not be killing myself slowly. Every day I don't smoke I am getting stronger.


#10 green meenie

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 01:08 AM

Just know that quitting smoking has never killed anyone but smoking for life has killed millions. - YOU decide which team you want to be on :)


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#11 Sparkle11

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 08:08 AM

So I'm reading these wonderful posts this morning by the pool (on a little holiday) in Italy. I've just finished a long bout of crying, been doing that a lot lately. I'd guess it's a reaction to not smoking or all the kindness I've received on here. I'm so grateful people take so much time in encouraging me. Have to say I've also been short tempered & irritable with my fella (non smoker of 30 years). Luckily he's responding to a few mails so not witness to this mornings tears. Lol. Seems everything gets on my nerves & I sometimes get this itchy feeling like ants crawling over me. But after a few minutes & deep breaths & an air cig it disappears. I'm fully aware I'll have good days & bad days. The 1st day was the biggest challenge but trying to not think about smoking plus the Champix does take the edge off. It's day for & the first time I haven't smoked in over 20 years. Fella often repeats the mantra from here. Smoking is not an option. This helps. I'm also going to find out about Joel's library & check out the newbie section. Am currently 3/4 way through Alan Carr & I like it a lot. Unfortunately we were sitting next to some people in an outside restaurant last night. The guy was smoking & the waft of cigarette smoke I got did not disgust me. I really hoped it would but it didn't. Mind you neither did it get me wanting to have a cigarette. My fella said the smell is horrible but I did not agree. One day in the future I'm sure I'll be repulsed but that didn't happen last night. Anyway, thank you all again. Today is another day. Counting the days to 1 week smoke free. I know that's nothing to most of you but it's huge for me. Will post later :)
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#12 Despair Not

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 09:04 AM

Sparkle

 

Nice update I'm glad your staying strong and educating yourself.

 

Keep up the good work.


"Get busy living or get busy dying"

 

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#13 anna2013

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 09:28 AM

Hi Sparkle11. Firstly a very big congrats to you  - you are doing brilliantly and it sounds like your partner is too! 

 

 Have to say I've also been short tempered & irritable with my fella (non smoker of 30 years). Luckily he's responding to a few mails so not witness to this mornings tears. Lol. ...... Fella often repeats the mantra from here. Smoking is not an option. This helps. 

 

It sounds like he is being really supportive, but if you haven't seen it already - many people have found this 'letter for loved ones' really helpful. 

 

http://www.quitsmoki...o-your-toolbox/

 

 

 I've just finished a long bout of crying, been doing that a lot lately....... Seems everything gets on my nerves & I sometimes get this itchy feeling like ants crawling over me. But after a few minutes & deep breaths & an air cig it disappears. I'm fully aware I'll have good days & bad days. 

 

 

And this all sounds totally normal for the early stages of your quit. I remember that 'ants' feeling only too well. I also seemed to flip between being irritable, crying and then sleeping whenever I could! Your mind and body is dealing with a lot right now. This thread below has some really useful links and advice that may help if you haven't already read it. 

 

https://www.quitsmok...from-addiction/

 

Being away will hopefully give you the opportunity to find lots of new ways of distracting yourself too, but what ever works best for you is the right way. Getting through that moment and taking one day at a time is so important.

 

And as you so rightly say - smoking is just not an option. You can do this and you are - so a very big well done to you. Keep posting as much as you can.  


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         Smokers don't 'get' to smoke, they 'have' to smoke - that's when the penny dropped for me..


#14 Biggie

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 10:21 AM

you have just made an elephant out of a mouse!
That's no issue at all, you might have some cravings or feel anxious or annoyed but in my calculation its literally 2 minutes in a day, sometimes twice.
Once you cross the 2-3 days line, life will feel much better, smell good, taste good, breathe deeper....I don't think you need any more reasoning to go ahead with it.

 

If you are into reading, try reading Alan carr - how to quit smoking, helped me with my quit.


NOT ONE PUFF EVER - N.O.P.E
 

Be Cool - Don't Be a Smoking Fool.

Be smart don't start.

Breathe healthily, live happily

 

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#15 Gigi74

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 12:24 PM

Glad you're making it through Sparkle and everything you said sounds completely normal! It's all part of the process. 

 

Hope you are enjoying your mini smoke-free holiday! Soak up sun for the rest of us!

 

Namaste. KTQ.


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We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.

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#16 Eric

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 01:47 PM

https://www.quitsmok...otional-filter/


“Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all of the barriers within yourself that you have built against it.”~Rumi

#17 Autumn

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 02:15 PM

Also, everyone's quit is different! I wouldn't get hyped up about one person's opinion about a particular day/week/month being really bad or super hard, because likely you will have your own unique experience with your own best and worst days. Of course, the earlier you are in your quit, the harder it is and the more intense the mood swings... that's a general rule. But as for which days you are "up" and which days you are "down" on the rollarcoaster, that's all going to be your own personal journey. :)

 

Just remember to never take another puff no matter how bad it gets. Doing so will only make you feel 10x worse and start you right back over.


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#18 green meenie

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 02:39 PM

Others here may have more time logged in as non-smokers but I think we would all agree that getting through the first week of your quit IS huge! Keep it up :)


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#19 Frank

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 03:23 PM

It will get better, for now one hour at a time get some non-smoking time under your belt. Enjoy the holiday !


 

Nov 6, 2011 I decided " I had enough with this sh*t "

I quit because I just got tired of the life under a rock, dark and with not enough air to breathe waiting for the day to get crushed!

Alcohol to a quit is like Kryptonite to Superman

Stop, Think and then React. Not React,Stop and then Think

Practice does not make it perfect, makes it permanent. Practice the right things!

Quitting is by far the best decision for the rest of your life.

If a Doctor gives you 6 months to live, would you start living after the first three? Quit now!

" I am a puff away form a pack a day"

Once you stop puffing or having Nicotine in any form, then and only then your symptoms will stop.

I quit with a frozen turkey. Once I felt comfortable with my quit,  I ate it.

Life is such a good teacher, that if you don't learn the lesson it will repeat it to you.

 

 

 


#20 putnaminn

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 06:36 PM

Trust me Sparkle, getting through week 1 is huge for most of us Newbies.  It was and is the best and worst of our addiction.  It is the best because we decided to give up smoking and we get all the support we can ask for.  It is the worst, because of how painful it is to get through this addiction.  That is why they call it Hell Week.

 

All the things you are going through are quite normal at this stage of your quit. This board will take you through the best of it as well as the worst of it.

 

I can't tell you how important that reading and watching the tapes in the Newbie's Package is. It is huge !!  The tapes will explain why you are having the feelings that you are having. They will explain what you can do about it. For instance,  in reading it finally became clear to me that I was an addict.  I was addicted to nicotine and the nasty addiction of smoking. I was no different than an alcoholic , a person addicted to any other kind of drug. I so didn't like the thought of that so I decided I was going to lick this addiction.  You will find something in these tapes and articles that will hit home with you.    They will help you in your journey. We will be here for you as well. :)               


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