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My Experience with Chantix


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#1 Good2Quit

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 09:13 PM

Hello All:

I posted above in the main board, but since I am using Chantix, I also thought I should post here as well.

I am nearly a month on Chantix and just finished up day 4 without a cigarette. So far I've not experienced bad side effects. A couple of bouts of indigestion and a few less than fulfilling nights sleep, but that's it. I have had some vivid dreams, but they were actually kinda awesome. So my experience has been pretty good.

I do want to express sorrow to those that have not been dealt this good of a hand with the drug. Believe me, I wish there was some words of wisdom as to why mine was good, and others not so good.

I am not a heavy drinker, never was, so giving up booze while on it was nothing, and I am on no other meds. That all may work in my favor.

Anyway, as you can see, I was on Chantix longer than I think most are before quitting the white tubes of death. I also honestly did not have a quit date set. Last thursday I smoked the last remaining cigarette in my pack (for weeks they were just not satisfying) and said to myself, "This is as good a time as ever" and just never bought the next pack.

It is a challenge at least a dozen times a day not to give in, but to me, I thank this drug a lot for giving me the control I need over this habit.

Anyway, I know the above was probably pretty boring, but I also wanted to thank those on this sub forum. I did a lot of research on Chantix before taking the leap, and reading the posts here helped a ton.

Take Care and best to you all.
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#2 Lin-quitting

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 11:20 PM

Thanks for sharing G2Q. I am also on Chantix and also having a very good experience with it. I quit on Chantix day 11, not really intending to, but got kind of sickly to my stomach that day, realized cigarettes would just make my gut feel worse, and before I knew it I had 10 hours into a Quit - I ran with it and never looked back.

 

I'm glad you are also having such a positive experience with it. And even gladder that you've joined this QSMB - it rocks. KTQ!


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#3 Good2Quit

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 10:30 PM

So. I made it through day 5 without a puff.

By now the nicotine is supposed to be out of my system, right?

It was a tough day. Lots of urges that I was able to fight through.

So why stay in the Chantix any longer? Not sure I understand what it would be doing to help once the nicotine has flushed out?

Regardless, I plan on staying with the pill through the weekend. Monday? Not so sure.

Thoughts?

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#4 Jillar

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 03:34 AM

The chantix may be making you over confident g2q. It's recommended people take it for three months. That's just a guideline and everyone is different but I think at only five days quit you are being a little over confident. Maybe you should consider taking it at least until your a solid month quit.
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#5 happycat

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 05:53 AM

I agree with jillar. The choice is yours of course and there is nothing wrong with cold turkey but If it was just a matter of clearing nicotine out of our system then it would be easy for anyone and everyone to quit in 3 days time. :) But realistically, quitting takes much more then 3 days to conquer and much of that is because of changes in brain chemistry related to nicotine use. It might help to understand what nicotine does to our brains to cause addiction and how chantix is thought to work. 

 

Nicotine binds to certain brain receptors that release chemicals that make us feel good. Smoking becomes rewarding and when the nicotine begins to wear off we start to crave another smoke.  But there's more, a little diabolical twist. The brain responds to nicotine by producing many more receptors, all demanding their nicotine fix. When we quit smoking it takes many weeks to months for the brain to readjust and downgrade the number of receptors that multiplied because we smoked. This is why the first few months of a quit can be especially difficult. 

 

Chantix is thought to at least partially bind to those same nicotine receptors so that the desire to smoke disappears. Similar to NRT's, this buys you time to replace bad habits with better ones as you adjust to living as a nonsmoker. It doesn't magically make you a nonsmoker. There is still some work and effort you'll need to put into quitting, and your brain will still need time to downgrade those receptors, but staying on track as you work your quit may be a little easier with chantix than without it. 

 

Again to continue with chantix or not is your choice. Whatever works for you is the right way as long as you're committed to NOPE. :)


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#6 Good2Quit

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 12:09 PM

Thanks both. That's why I came here. Great advise. I'll hold off till I'm at least done with the second month then see how it's going. I've always been kind of suspect of prescription drugs. Tried to stay off em as much as possible but in this case you might be right.
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#7 Lin-quitting

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 02:18 PM

GtQ, I'm chiming in to agree with happycat and Jillar. I know I didn't really realize how well the Chantix was working on my brain until I switched to a half dose (I had a good reason for doing so and do not recommend others do this - it was just what was necessary for me). At which point boy oh boy, all of a sudden I understand all the struggles and cravings and brain weirdnesses that other quitters are experiencing. I thought I was just having an exceptionally easy quit, until I had to realize that it was the Chantix that was making it that way.

 

If you're not experiencing any adverse effects then by all means stay on the Chantix until you have enough quit time under your belt to KNOW you can go on without it. I'm thinking for me I'll probably discontinue the Chantix at my 3 months "Quitaversary". :smile: I know that every day I stay clean I feel stronger about doing it on my own.

 

We can do this, one way or t'other! KTQ!


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                  "I didn't come this far to only come this far."

 

30ksjlf.jpg

 

I want my life back. I WANT MY LIFE BACK!

There is no try, there is only do. Failure is not an option.

Another proud member of the 2017 Smokebusters team.


#8 Good2Quit

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 05:27 PM

GtQ, I'm chiming in to agree with happycat and Jillar. I know I didn't really realize how well the Chantix was working on my brain until I switched to a half dose (I had a good reason for doing so and do not recommend others do this - it was just what was necessary for me). At which point boy oh boy, all of a sudden I understand all the struggles and cravings and brain weirdnesses that other quitters are experiencing. I thought I was just having an exceptionally easy quit, until I had to realize that it was the Chantix that was making it that way.
 
If you're not experiencing any adverse effects then by all means stay on the Chantix until you have enough quit time under your belt to KNOW you can go on without it. I'm thinking for me I'll probably discontinue the Chantix at my 3 months "Quitaversary". :smile: I know that every day I stay clean I feel stronger about doing it on my own.
 
We can do this, one way or t'other! KTQ!


Just curious, how long after you lowered the dose did it take for the struggles to begin?

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#9 Lin-quitting

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 08:28 PM

2-3 days, pretty quickly. But everything leveled out again another 4-5 days after that. So I had a week or so of "harder times". I'm feeling very good and in control now; it's been about 2 weeks since I went to a once-a-day dosage.


    image.png?base_img=6&size=0&date_yr=2017

 

               

                  "I didn't come this far to only come this far."

 

30ksjlf.jpg

 

I want my life back. I WANT MY LIFE BACK!

There is no try, there is only do. Failure is not an option.

Another proud member of the 2017 Smokebusters team.


#10 MaggieMayRC

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Posted 15 April 2017 - 03:37 PM

Hi all, 

It was great to read all of your experiences and ideas on Chantix.  I started it on January 22nd, and adjusted it based on the nausea. I didn't take it until one hour after eating and the nausea stopped right away. I didn't stop drinking either, I am a social drinker. I didn't want to get to the 12 week mark, have a drink and have a huge craving because lets face it, having a drink is when most love a smoke!  I smoked for about 40 years and before I stopped was up to a pack and a half.

 

So the reason I am here is I am on week 12 and scared of finishing based on some of the really bad comments I have read.  Although I officially have 4 pills left, I also have about 8-10 spare that I had forgotten to take over the 12 weeks.  Anyone got any tips on going off the chantix, I know I won't just stop that's for sure!  I have no problem calling the doctor to get more if need be.  If you have done the 12 weeks and weaned yourself off, what dosage did you do for how long?

Thank you!

 

And if anyone wants to ask me questions about starting out or other side effects I had, please feel free! 

 

Maggie



#11 Good2Quit

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Posted 15 April 2017 - 08:40 PM

Thanks Maggie.

Can't help with your questions though. I've had only a few side effects, and when I complete I plan on posting a complete review. As of now I'm 9 days smoke free and that's the best part so far.
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#12 mei

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 01:37 AM

Maggie.

  I did Chantix for the full 3 months. The last 2 weeks I took 1/2 pill twice a day for 1 week, then 1/2 pill once a day for the second week. Had some cravings for maybe a week after quitting chantix. These cravings were 

very mild and easy to over come. Congrats on your quit. Stay Strong!!! If your not comfortable doing it this way your Dr. can tell you what they consider the best way to quit chantix.


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#13 MaggieMayRC

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 02:05 AM

Maggie.

  I did Chantix for the full 3 months. The last 2 weeks I took 1/2 pill twice a day for 1 week, then 1/2 pill once a day for the second week. Had some cravings for maybe a week after quitting chantix. These cravings were 

very mild and easy to over come. Congrats on your quit. Stay Strong!!! If your not comfortable doing it this way your Dr. can tell you what they consider the best way to quit chantix.

That helps, I don't want to crash and burn after 3 months of being clean.  I have never made it this far before.  I still have some mild cravings but I call them ghost cravings. They sneak up on me, but are not strong enough to make me get in the car and go buy a pack. The mind games have completely stopped, you know, that little voice inside your head that says "one smoke won't kill you!".  Now it just says, "Have a snack, is there chocolate in the house?"  LOL


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#14 MaggieMayRC

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 02:12 AM

Thanks Maggie.

Can't help with your questions though. I've had only a few side effects, and when I complete I plan on posting a complete review. As of now I'm 9 days smoke free and that's the best part so far.

One thing I did when I first quit was print out a list of changes that happen to your body when you quit.  I found that really cool to read every few days or if I had a bad craving. So Day 9?  My checklist says "You should be down to about 3 short cravings a day at this point".  Hmmm mine were higher than that, but I pushed through, and you can too!  You can do it this G2Q!!!


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#15 Dutchess66

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 12:00 PM

Hi man from the cornfields,

Congratulations on your quit! I intend to do the Chantix for the full 3 months and if necessary a little bit longer. We'll cross that bridge when we come to it.
Luckily I also have very few, or no side effects. I feel very blessed with that. Last night I even forgot to take my pill. My coach told me this would happen and she's right!
Until now the quitting has not been easy, more like doable. Thanks to Champix no doubt, but also thanks to myself, my family, friends and of course my friends here on the board.
It is so good to talk to the people who know how it feels and who know the pitfalls and who know all about patches, cold turkey, Chantix and most of all: not smoking!
Sometimes I even feel a sniff of freedom and this feels so good. I hope you can also feel this soon!

Keep up the good work!

Dutchess (very curious about the cornfields)
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Yes! I quit smoking, but still I am fighting my addiction but hey:

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#16 Good2Quit

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 04:37 PM

Hi all and thanks for the responses and comments.

I am now on my 3rd day off of Chantix. 11 days smoke free.

I got off after a bit over thirty days when taking the pill started making my really drowsy. I practically live in my car, so sleepiness is not an option.

I had to make a choice. Continue with Chantix and quit driving, or go without and see what happens.

I am NOT recommending this, it is just something that life demanded, but honestly, I'm feeling good, awake and no adverse effects.

The first day without it was rough, but nowhere near as bad as I had thought it would be. Yesterday was better, and so far today I'm not feeling any adverse effects at all from either the Chantix or nicotine withdrawals.

Keeping my fingers crossed at this point, but I honestly believe that I won't be lighting up ever again.

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#17 josan333

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Posted 28 June 2017 - 04:08 PM

Hi all and thanks for the responses and comments.

I am now on my 3rd day off of Chantix. 11 days smoke free.

I got off after a bit over thirty days when taking the pill started making my really drowsy. I practically live in my car, so sleepiness is not an option.

I had to make a choice. Continue with Chantix and quit driving, or go without and see what happens.

I am NOT recommending this, it is just something that life demanded, but honestly, I'm feeling good, awake and no adverse effects.

The first day without it was rough, but nowhere near as bad as I had thought it would be. Yesterday was better, and so far today I'm not feeling any adverse effects at all from either the Chantix or nicotine withdrawals.

Keeping my fingers crossed at this point, but I honestly believe that I won't be lighting up ever again.

I just started yesterday to 1 pill a day after being on it for 7 weeks.  It was causing to many problems with my stomach( bloating and everything else)

 I'm 28 days smoke free and loving it.    Second day on 1 pill and have to say my digestive problems are starting to be back to normal.

 

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#18 putnaminn

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Posted 28 June 2017 - 05:48 PM

Happy to hear that is working for you. I plan on starting the step down in about 2 weeks.  I will pick up my 3 month of Chantix, I will continue to use as directed for the 1st week or so of this month's supply. Then I will reduce it to 1 a day for a week or so.  Then I will do the rest at half a tablet.  Wella, then I will be free of them also.  Wow, still can't believe we are that far in our journey.

 

You are doing fantastic !!!.     You are planning out your quit nicely !!!.      So proud of you !!!.    Keep up the good work !!!.


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#19 Orca

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Posted 28 June 2017 - 06:54 PM

Great that it's working for you. I hear a lot of mixed thoughts on the drug but when it works, it really works. I don't think it would have been right for me but I'm so glad it's right for others. Congrats on the quit and well done.
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#20 Seabeyond

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 05:10 AM

I agree with jillar. The choice is yours of course and there is nothing wrong with cold turkey but If it was just a matter of clearing nicotine out of our system then it would be easy for anyone and everyone to quit in 3 days time. :) But realistically, quitting takes much more then 3 days to conquer and much of that is because of changes in brain chemistry related to nicotine use. It might help to understand what nicotine does to our brains to cause addiction and how chantix is thought to work. 

 

Nicotine binds to certain brain receptors that release chemicals that make us feel good. Smoking becomes rewarding and when the nicotine begins to wear off we start to crave another smoke.  But there's more, a little diabolical twist. The brain responds to nicotine by producing many more receptors, all demanding their nicotine fix. When we quit smoking it takes many weeks to months for the brain to readjust and downgrade the number of receptors that multiplied because we smoked. This is why the first few months of a quit can be especially difficult. 

 

Chantix is thought to at least partially bind to those same nicotine receptors so that the desire to smoke disappears. Similar to NRT's, this buys you time to replace bad habits with better ones as you adjust to living as a nonsmoker. It doesn't magically make you a nonsmoker. There is still some work and effort you'll need to put into quitting, and your brain will still need time to downgrade those receptors, but staying on track as you work your quit may be a little easier with chantix than without it. 

 

Again to continue with chantix or not is your choice. Whatever works for you is the right way as long as you're committed to NOPE. :)

Totally interesting.  Thank you for this information.  I love understanding how this all works.  The drug makes me sick.  Nauseous.  So, I do want off as soon as possible, but yes, ....  What you are saying makes sense.  I cut it in half today.  I do not feel as bad and I was fine thru out my day.  I can increase it again, if I see I am struggling.  It does help to understand the process though, how it works.






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