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Did anyone successfully quit using NRT gum?


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#41 Helena

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 12:17 AM

Hey y'all, sorry if the article I posted came off as argumentative. That wasn't my intention. It was my intention to share some science-based info about CT, as it helped me immensely when I was new in my quit and asking the same questions as seeking_freedom. Having this info actually helped save my quit.

 

Cold turkey works for many people, and I support any method that gets people free.

 

Alan Peters is the one who runs Quitnet, right? Maybe a method behind his madness? Making money off NRT's? Just a thought.

 

I understand that you're wary, Avian, so I hope it's ok if I respond to you with some info.
 Alan Peters did not run Quitnet, but is a Master's level cessation counselor. QN was started by Dr. Nate Cobb (M.D.) as a grassroots, not-for-profit public health project for Boston College in 1995. They became tied to insurance companies many years later, which is partly why I've stepped away. 


Also, a preface to what I pasted said the article "isn't a debate on whether or not you should quit cold turkey, nor a response to anti-NRT theorists. The author doesn't work for tobacco companies, nor any tobacco product manufacturers or distributors, and QuitNet receives no revenue from the sale or advertisement of NRT or other quit-aids." It also said it was trying to discuss "what the research indicates -- and that's what we speak to here. If you can quit cold turkey, you should -- the sooner the better," and further made clear that "no QuitNet authors or experts receive research funding or other remuneration from pharmaceutical companies."


I hope that helps clear some things up. Again, I meant no offense. I'm happy to agree to disagree, and I think you're the cat's meow, Avian! (Or the bird's tweet?) : )


Seek, the info I shared was only one of hundreds of sources I read in the beginning of my quit. Understanding my addiction was the single most powerful factor in my getting free, right up there with support, so I encourage you to read everything you can, question everything, and become as empowered by information as I eventually was. 



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#42 avian3

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 12:30 AM

Hey y'all, sorry if the article I posted came off as argumentative. That wasn't my intention. It was my intention to share some science-based info about CT, as it helped me immensely when I was new in my quit and asking the same questions as seeking_freedom. Having this info actually helped save my quit.

 

Cold turkey works for many people, and I support any method that gets people free.

 

I understand that you're wary, Avian, so I hope it's ok if I respond to you with some info.
 Alan Peters did not run Quitnet, but is a Master's level cessation counselor. QN was started by Dr. Nate Cobb (M.D.) as a grassroots, not-for-profit public health project for Boston College in 1995. They became tied to insurance companies many years later, which is partly why I've stepped away. 


Also, a preface to what I pasted said the article "isn't a debate on whether or not you should quit cold turkey, nor a response to anti-NRT theorists. The author doesn't work for tobacco companies, nor any tobacco product manufacturers or distributors, and QuitNet receives no revenue from the sale or advertisement of NRT or other quit-aids." It also said it was trying to discuss "what the research indicates -- and that's what we speak to here. If you can quit cold turkey, you should -- the sooner the better," and further made clear that "no QuitNet authors or experts receive research funding or other remuneration from pharmaceutical companies."


I hope that helps clear some things up. Again, I meant no offense. I'm happy to agree to disagree, and I think you're the cat's meow, Avian! (Or the bird's tweet?) : )


Seek, the info I shared was only one of hundreds of sources I read in the beginning of my quit. Understanding my addiction was the single most powerful factor in my getting free, right up there with support, so I encourage you to read everything you can, question everything, and become as empowered by information as I eventually was. 


I appreciate your response and I am willing to read all info on the debate. I was of the belief and could be mistaken, after reading, that they did receive funding from a certain pharmaceutical company. I will recheck my sources.


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#43 Beacon

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 01:36 PM

Hi, chiming in late. I hope you did quit and the gum is helping you. I believe that you should do whatever helps

in order for me to quit, I did everything. I did the full run of patches, four months, watched tons of videos at whyquit, meditated, walked, ate candy, posted here and read here relentlessly, watched nonsmoking videos on youtube and read and believed in Alan Carr. I dedicated a significant amount of time and effort and thought to my quit. I noped and embraced the suck and thank God I did quit on my first try after 30 years of smoking a pack a day.

The patches helped me mentally , to feel that I was not alone. However, one day the patch had to come off and there were still craves to deal with so having a full tool box was important. The gum is just a tool, why not try it and see if it helps you. But as simple as it sounds, saying and following NOPE is the real key, the commitment

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#44 RichWorld

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Posted 08 July 2015 - 07:14 PM

Here is an overview of NRT and an example of its uses. 
 

The patch, gum, and lozenges are basically the same. NRT, Nicotine Replacement Therapy. It is nothing more than a way to get medical grade nicotine into your system without the smoke and all the poisons of cigarettes. It gives you a way to control and step down the amount of nicotine in your system on your own terms. Can it be addictive? Absolutely! It is nicotine and we are nicotine addicts and using NRT to quit has been controversial in the past.

 

However, in my opinion, it should be viewed as a tool not a crutch. IT should be viewed as medication and not taken lightly. I worked with my doctor who told me chew all the gum I wanted, that he knows no side effects of it, and is hands down better than smoking. Period. It is better to be a temporary nicotine addict than a smoker.The patch is used all day long but the lozenges and gum are different. The gum is not chewed like regular gum. Nicotine is absorbed through the mouth not the stomach so you chew it 5 to 10 times then hold it between your cheek and gum for about 5 to 10 minutes then repeat the process for about 30 minutes. Same with the lozenges just don’t chew them. You can use both of these as needed or on a regular schedule.

 

I was a heavy smoker so I started out with a 21mg patch and 4mg gum. This was a huge help to get past the first week. I then stepped down to the 14mg patch then the 7mg patch then no patch but still chewing 4mg gum. I then went to 2mg gum about once or twice a day to cut the edge here or there. Now, I use nothing. I could not have quit smoking without it. 

 

As always, get with your doctor first and read all instructions before beginning to use any medication. 

 

I hope that helps, 

 

Richard

Protect Your Quit and Live Life Well 

 

 


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#45 Norm

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Posted 03 January 2016 - 02:14 AM

The gum helped me quit, 18 months smoke free.

#46 fonza60

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Posted 03 January 2016 - 06:01 PM

The gum is helping me to quit. 32 days :grin:  I AL wise felt I would have to be put into a induced coma to quit smoking. The thing that ticks me off is the price of gum so am not saving much money but I feel so much better physically. The day after new years we drove to the mountains and hiked in to three beautiful waterfalls a lot of it was up hill, I didn't get winded 32 days ago it would have been a embarrassment. I don't feel good about having to use the gum gum after reading on this forum but its keeping me off the cigarette's.



#47 Guest_antiochus_*

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 03:57 PM

fonza.. its that you are doing it and not how.. you should be totally proud of yourself because you are getting one thing totally wiped out even by using the gum and that is the mental aspect of it...when you get off the nrt i bet you will do super.. when its time just replace it with wrigleys or something...awesome on the hike.. once again you should be super proud of yourself....



#48 REZ

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Posted 15 February 2016 - 07:59 PM

For me using the NRT's, I wanted to be able to adjust the amount of nicotine going in to my body and used it only when i needed to.

 

My sticky quit was accomplished by using the gum. I used a combination of 4mg, 2mg, and regular gum. 

 

Started out first with the 4mg and regular gum for about 1 week and a half 

 

2mg and regular gum for the next week and a half

 

Regular gum for the next week or so.

 

Depending how big of a crave and how long between pieces would determine what gum i used. 

 

Almost 2-1/2 years later I still have a pack of regular gum around just in case but never needed it yet. 

 

I think everyone is different so each person will require a different amount and time to cut down.


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#49 Smokefreetoday

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 02:26 PM

Myself I am the type that wades slowly into something. I quit last June for 2 months, relapsed, then in August quit for 2 months, relapsed and now I have 5 months quit. All 3 were with NRT. The first time I did try the gum but 2 mg was so strong so I went to the puffer. On my second quit I cut pieces of 2mg gum and for me that worked. Third quit the same.

 

From smoking I am addicted to nicotine and the delivery method. The fact the toxins and tar from smoking stink does not change the want for the quick injection of nicotine that smoking provides. The junkie wants to receive that quick pulse . I will always be addicted to nicotine so smoking is not an option.

 

The patch or other NRT methods do not provide the quick and that is partly why they have helped me to get my Quit(s) started. Just sayin. 



#50 KeithInSpace

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 06:33 PM

Hi all

 

Two NRT experiences from my side:

 

1.  The one (and only) lengthy past quit of mine (relapsed after 1 year!!..D'oh!!)  I used gums like textbook....over 3 months, using with cravings and gradually weening down the number of gums till it was 1 a day the last few days etc (actually this seemed to happen automatically...the cravings themselves were less and less so in a way I was a textbook example).  So they did work.  The fact that I started smoking again 9 months later doesnt change the fact that they worked for me (I was truly over smoking...I just wasnt over being stupid)

 

2.  This time, knowing that they helped before (and having a bit of the same strategy of weening), I am using the gums again.  I am using 4mg and started with around 8 a day (sometimes I cut them in half as dont seem to always really "need" the full 4mg).  I decided that while I would follow the cravings I would also try to start at a daily limit.  So this was an immediate reduction of overall daily nicotine of about 50%, compared to what I was getting as a smoker, so was a bit of instant partial withdrawal and adjustment, but has been fine since ("fine" in the sense that they help reduce the intesity of craving pangs....I'm still not exactly jumping for joy yet).   I am averaging 6 gums a day now at 1 month and will keep tapering down

 

I dont really think much of about  this or that study says on CT versus NRT.  The truth is probably somewhere in the middle of the many contradictory statements, reports and studies.  It would be impossible to real gauge and account for a person's true level of commitment in any of these studies.  My personal opinion is NRT can help IF you have the right motivation and insights to begin with.  If you are committed to your quit and will never smoke again, then gums will have a 100% success rate guaranteed - in reducing the "suffering" of withdrawal symptoms.   Of course, the payment if you will is that you have to extend the withdrawal period far longer.  So it becomes a bit about how one views or considers "suffering", and is subjective.  But I think as long as the commitment is there, then they can be a good idea (just as CT too can be a good idea, if that is a person's choice). 

 

But really important to use them as intended and to be sure to taper them off.  I read these stories of folks still chewing gums after 5 years!  I suppose its better than smoking, but not the idea really.  Gotta get that nicotine completely out of your body in a reasonable timeframe, like a few month maximum.

 

All the best


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#51 Lili

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Posted 28 April 2016 - 06:44 AM

I'm on the gum as we speak.  Haven't been on it long though.  I have tried quitting cold turkey, too many times to count.

I suffer with PTSD, so cold turkey withdrawal is NOT fun. Even with the gum, the symptoms aren't nice. My advice to you

would be, just do whatever works for you.  What works for one is not necessarily going to work for another...and don't guilt

yourself out about it.  Do your best each day and if you fk up, just try again tomorrow.



#52 nutzip

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Posted 26 August 2016 - 12:33 AM

What's it matter how people quit as long as they quit

#53 Mayan2016

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Posted 08 September 2016 - 09:04 PM

Just to update YES!!! I quit using the gum!!! I quit 01/15/2016,,, never thought I could do but have not look back since that date ( smoke for 36 years)
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#54 Svetlety

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 02:56 PM

I`ll tell you my expirience (even it`s a small one). First four-five day I used the gum one or two times a day (when I need to smoke most - morning or after meal). After that till now I don`t need this gum anymore, BUT I take them with me, so if I need emergency - don`t need to smoke. BUT it`s important to know that the gum is addictive too, that`s why I don`t use it anymore, we don`t need another addiction. Good luck ! :)



#55 Jordan91

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Posted 08 December 2016 - 03:22 AM

I have not found NRT (gum) to be successful in the long term as a quitting aid - as it just draws out the quitting process for longer than it should take. 

 

That being said, I do recommend a week or two using NRT after stoping smoking actual cigarettes - to allow yourself to get used to a life of not smoking and form new daily patterns etc before going cold turkey. 

 

I had successes in the past starting off quits with NRT before going cold turkey. 

 

You could also look at keeping nicotine gum on hand if you are really feeling like you're at risk of a relapse? Better a piece of gum that won't kill you to a cigarette that eventually will right? 


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#56 CancerstickColin

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 02:59 PM

I used the gum for the first couple of months of my quit and it helped me ALOT! I did jumping jacks, push ups or running on the spot when a craving came on, it got me out of breath and then i didn't feel like a smoke. The gum can be very effective IMO.

 

 

Colin


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#57 beazel

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 08:59 PM

I did not do well with the gum. I chewed 1 piece as directed on day one. I don't know if it was from the gum, but, my tongue got so ulcerated it was so painful to eat or drink anything for about 5 days.

Don't regret that I paid $10 for 1 piece of gum...forced me to go cold turkey, which I wanted to do in the first place but was too nervous. Funny how things work out. Cold turkey wasn't so scary after all.

Go with whatever works for YOU....just don't smoke.


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#58 missjaq

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Posted 14 April 2017 - 03:05 AM

I use NRT or I would probably still be smoking cigarettes. I feel this is a big improvement for me. I chew a lot less gum than I would smoke. I use a low dose  but have used a higher. I am 2-3 months without cigarettes and feeling comfortable without them. I find I chew less each week as the habit fades. So many of my smokes were a habit grab, not a desire. Also, when I did light up I smoked the whole cigarette, and then another if I was going to have a long wait before I could smoke again. Sort of a mental pressure that I was going to be denied the ability, so I smoked more. The gum takes that pressure off. I will go hours without gum and not think about it. With cigarettes I was very aware when I had my last cigarette. 






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