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Not smoking but restarting Chantix, anyway.


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#41 SharonSiff

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 03:43 PM

That's fabulous news, so glad that you are feeling fine. Enjoy your time out and your cooking- I hope you cook up a storm ;)
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#42 2¢™

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 04:46 PM

Hurrah! You're a true macher, you are!


"Only please don't make me read Allen Carr."

 


#43 dentalfloss

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 04:48 PM

So good to hear. What did your dr say about restarting the chantix?

#44 Chrysalis

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 06:10 PM

So good to hear. What did your dr say about restarting the chantix?

Doctor is next week.


Note to self: Even if I do smoke ONE cigarette and that ONE cigarette gives me relief from these AWFUL feelings, how long will that relief last? Forever? No, of course not. All day? No. An hour? Unlikely. I know perfectly well that the relief I feel, such as it is, will only last about 15 minutes before I'm right back to where I am now-- NEEDING just ONE cigarette to deal with these AWFUL feelings.  All right-- forget it! Forget the d*** cigarette! N.O.P.E.

 

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#45 Mgarucci

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Posted 15 August 2014 - 11:42 PM

Try stapling a chicken to your forehead.  It has been rumored for years  to be an effective quit method... 

At least you wouldn't be thinking about smoking with that painful staple and that dangling chicken on your face.

You might have a tough time explaining it to your doctor though, sooooo........ nevermind :D

 

I'm glad you're seeing your doc soon, and hope everything gets straightened out for you. 

OMG you are killin' me with this one Marciem - priceless...first time I've really laughed out loud in 2 weeks. :lol:


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#46 Mgarucci

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Posted 15 August 2014 - 11:55 PM

Chrys, I respect the honesty in your posts. I am sure you speak what many are afraid to admit, myself included. I appreciate your words of encouragement to me from my beginnings, and like you I started out as a peeker. I am only 2 weeks into my quit, but share similar thoughts and am wise enough to know that they will probably "haunt" me for sometime. I love the positivity of everyone on the site, but sometimes, the reality is what it is. Do what you need to do. You know you are dedicated to your quit, otherwise you won't give a S&%t enough to post. You could have gone on pretending everything was okay. Who would know right?

 

The support is here. I hope to have some time under my belt so that I can offer words to others like you have done for me. Chin up, take care of business girl!


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#47 Chrysalis

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 12:02 PM

Thanks, Mgarucci. You are quite right, it does take courage to announce here that you are struggling. On the one hand, we all worry most about the newbies whose quits are delicate. We want them to know that things might be kind of miserable in the beginning but it's all temporary. After a few weeks things get better and you're so happy you quit. Telling newbies that you are X months into your quit and still struggling (sometimes) might discourage them. We don't want to do that so we tend to minimize our difficult days. And really, it's good for us to minimize difficult days. If you focus on them you blow them out of proportion. So keeping your mouth shut about feeling temptation is the accepted practice here.  

 

On the other hand, what about the people who did quit for a month or several months and are in danger of relapsing? Don't they count, too? The fact that 66% of QSMB members relapse in less than a year is a crying shame. If nobody admits publicly that they sometimes struggle, everybody thinks that they are the ONLY one struggling! They start to think, "Everybody else is perfectly fine and comfortable in their quit. I'm the ONLY one who has to keep fighting. I guess I am the "special snowflake", the one who really is so addicted that I just can't quit." They feel "different" and discouraged and they eventually go back to smoking.

 

As you say, I am totally committed to keeping this quit. The fact that I am having to struggle just now does not frighten me; it challenges me. I KNOW that I will prevail somehow; my challenge is to figure out how. So I decided to go public with my struggles. My hope is that other quitters-- oldies and newbies-- will see that people can hit a rocky patch, feel a little shaky in their quit for a while,  but find a way to right themselves and go on Keeping The Quit. 

 

For me, today, I'm feeling really good.  The CONSTANT thoughts about going out to buy cigarettes have stopped; they stopped several days ago. It's such a relief! N.O.P.E. for me today!


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Note to self: Even if I do smoke ONE cigarette and that ONE cigarette gives me relief from these AWFUL feelings, how long will that relief last? Forever? No, of course not. All day? No. An hour? Unlikely. I know perfectly well that the relief I feel, such as it is, will only last about 15 minutes before I'm right back to where I am now-- NEEDING just ONE cigarette to deal with these AWFUL feelings.  All right-- forget it! Forget the d*** cigarette! N.O.P.E.

 

image.png?base_img=3&size=0&date_yr=2014

 

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#48 Cristobal

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 04:01 PM

Chrysalis,

 

Your quit is still young. 4 months is fantastic and you are not a Newbie anymore (at 90 days that changed), but it is still not too far from your last cigarette.

 

There is still a lot of things going on with your quit, and those things now are not physical, they are changes and adjustments that are mental, emotional, and spiritual.

 

The addiction is awful, it dominates our lives in all of these areas.....24 hours a day, for as long as we smoke.

 

Because of this, you may still have some difficult days, or perhaps it is more better to say you may have days when you just do not feel normal.

 

 

Just continue to believe that it will get better, because it will.

 

Compare where you are right now at 4 months versus where you were during month 1.

 

Did it not get more easier and better ???

 

The difference in how you feel between these 2 periods of time, will be similar in so ways to how you feel now and how you will feel when you celebrate your 1 year anniversary.

 

Keep climbing the rope....and N.O.P.E. every day !!!

 

:grin: :grin: :grin:

 

 

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► I am a ** OLDE PHARTE ** (1 year + :grin: ) !!!
► I smoked 30 years, 2 packs a day ... Bleah ..... :shock: :shock: :shock:
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#49 Beacon

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 04:52 PM

Hi, i am justing reading this now. Chrys, i want to tell you that at four months and beyond I fought off the urge to smoke every day. I still think about smoking everyday. Now these thoughts are not as strong, frequent or as pressing as time goes on. But they come. I am just mentioning this in case everyone is giving the impression that after a month or so, all is fine and dandy and you are some how different

Edit, Newbies, i am so thankful to be where I am at now and I am not suffering, so don't worry; it gets better.

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#50 Chrysalis

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 07:19 PM

Thanks, Beacon. It's nice to know that I am not the only one who continues to fight off the urge to smoke. Actually, I suspected that I was not the only one. Most of the time the urge is mild and only really demands my attention once or twice a week. I accept that as being a normal part of the quit process and expect that, as you say, it will continue to fade with time. Such urges can be annoying but they don't really threaten my quit.

 

In recent weeks, though, I have been dealing with an especially stressful situation and the urge to smoke was really causing me trouble because it was just so constant. That is why I was worried about a relapse-- my recent special circumstances not my quit in general. I started taking a low dose of Chantix and implemented every stress-reduction technique I know of and it's working. I'm feeling less stress and am again secure in my quit.

 

Maybe the day will come when I don't even think about cigarettes no matter what my stress level. But until that day arrives, I am happy that I appear to have some additional tools in my toolbox that I can use to protect my quit during the tough times. 


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Note to self: Even if I do smoke ONE cigarette and that ONE cigarette gives me relief from these AWFUL feelings, how long will that relief last? Forever? No, of course not. All day? No. An hour? Unlikely. I know perfectly well that the relief I feel, such as it is, will only last about 15 minutes before I'm right back to where I am now-- NEEDING just ONE cigarette to deal with these AWFUL feelings.  All right-- forget it! Forget the d*** cigarette! N.O.P.E.

 

image.png?base_img=3&size=0&date_yr=2014

 

2j3342d.jpg

 

 

 


#51 Bassman

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 02:40 AM

 
For me, today, I'm feeling really good.  The CONSTANT thoughts about going out to buy cigarettes have stopped; they stopped several days ago. It's such a relief! N.O.P.E. for me today!


This is good and happy for you that you have some relief. ........

My doctor gave me both Chantix and Zyban for what its worth.....

While I don't have the "fight off the urge" urge, I as well do still get urges, sometimes a couple of times a day, but nothing like what you are going through. There are just so many factors involved with each of us.


I do however, keep a constant guard on my quit as the unexpected could happen.....hense some people with months, and years quits relapsing. While it is easy to NOPE (just don't light a cigarette and smoke it), circumstances may make it difficult to maintain NOPE and that is where I use vigilance in my quit. To this day I still daily thank myself for quitting as I still cannot believe I have done this and stayed quit so long.....But I did...........keep us posted......Bassman
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#52 Eddo

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 05:17 AM

 

Maybe the day will come when I don't even think about cigarettes no matter what my stress level. But until that day arrives, I am happy that I appear to have some additional tools in my toolbox that I can use to protect my quit during the tough times. 

Chrysalis

The most effective tool is the truth.

Nicotine never has and never will relieve stress. This is a very well crafted marketing ploy started by the tobacco companies. In fact, smoking heightens stress levels and encourages chronic stress because of the effects it has on the body like: elevated blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate, etc. The stressful situations that you are referencing would be made worse by adding nicotine to the situation.The next time you feel stressed out try this method: take 4 slow and long deep breaths in through the nose and out through the mouth. It will work in 10 minutes or less and will work every time. The reason for this is because this deep breathing activates the Vagus nerve which is associated with the parasympathetic nervous system (rest and digest).

 

Believe

Ed


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There is no try. There is do and do not~Yoda

Losers quit when they fail. Winners fail until they succeed~Robert Kiyosak

Just one cigarette is exactly how every smoker on the planet started, and it is also how every single ex-smoker on the planet relapsed~Allen Carr

 


#53 holyhell

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 02:17 PM

Dear Chrys,

 

You have me worried by what I saw you post in another thread.  Please know that whatever is going on behind the scenes is not the full story.  If it were the full story then it would be out in the open.  Would it not?  You know it and I know it.  Something wrong is going on here at the board.  I don't know what it is but it is like a virus feeding into the brains of our members.  Something going on behind the scenes.

 

I would be glad to know what it is.

 

You are doing just as Cristobal prescribed.  You => Quit => Life.

 

And you are an amazing, strong, way-cool woman.  Just keep that quit!  That quit is yours!  :)


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Only one puff away from a pack a day

Saying yes to one invites the thousands hiding behind that one

A successful quit is a life-preserver through the trials of life

A crave passes whether you smoke or not

I stopped the damage at 5:27 pm Thursday, January 23, 2014


#54 holyhell

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 03:38 PM

Chrysalis

The most effective tool is the truth.

Nicotine never has and never will relieve stress. This is a very well crafted marketing ploy started by the tobacco companies. In fact, smoking heightens stress levels and encourages chronic stress because of the effects it has on the body like: elevated blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate, etc. The stressful situations that you are referencing would be made worse by adding nicotine to the situation.The next time you feel stressed out try this method: take 4 slow and long deep breaths in through the nose and out through the mouth. It will work in 10 minutes or less and will work every time. The reason for this is because this deep breathing activates the Vagus nerve which is associated with the parasympathetic nervous system (rest and digest).

 

Believe

Ed

 

Ed I am very curious to know more about this breathing, vagus nerve and parasympathetic nervous system and will be looking up what I can on the web.  Breathing has been a huge challenge for me and I am even taking Yoga to help address regulated breathing and breath control.  If you know more then maybe you can start a thread about it to help us all out here.


          1cf13b0e13.png      th_imagejpg11_zps41a23c3b.jpg

 

Only one puff away from a pack a day

Saying yes to one invites the thousands hiding behind that one

A successful quit is a life-preserver through the trials of life

A crave passes whether you smoke or not

I stopped the damage at 5:27 pm Thursday, January 23, 2014


#55 Eddo

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 05:43 PM

We have two major nervous systems 

1. CNS-central nervous system which is the brain and the spinal cord

2. PNS-peripheral nervous system which is all of the nerves that send messages to and recieve commands from, the CNS

 

Within the PNS there is a autonomic (automatic) division and a somatic (conscious) division. The part we are concerned with is the autonomic division which is divided further into the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems respectively. They are opposites. Sympathetic ramps up the body to deal with stressful situations like running away from a lion. The parasympathetic division is concerned with relaxing the body and is responsible for the digestion of food, etc.

 

Think of the running from the lion example for a moment. 

We see the lion and our Sympathetic response puts us into fight or flight which causes:

1. increased heart rate

2. increased blood pressure

3. increased breathing rate

4. increased vigilance (being "on guard")

5. Increased oxygen saturation

6. suppression of appetite

7. suppression of salivary glands (we have three: in the cheeks, below the tongue, and below the chin)

 

This response is synonymous with the stress response. The body is gearing up to deal with a difficult situation. Now, this sympathetic response could be due to seeing a lion, or taking a difficult exam, or giving a speech, etc. The response will always be the same.

 

Parasympathetic is the opposite. The two divisions balance each other because of the drive for homeostasis, which is "normal" or balance for the body. Parasympathetic will prepare us to rest and relax. The Vagus nerve is very important because it is the nerve that innervates (supplies sensation) to the internal organs which are used for digestion and elimination of waste (the vagus nerve supplies 75% of all parasympathetic fibers). The process of digestion is like a wave of automatic and regular impulses that propel the food we eat through our bodies and eventually out. It is slow, relaxed, and peaceful.

 

The parasympathetic division can be activated by relaxful situations like slow, measured breathing. I hope my explanation helped some. I have also linked a couple youtubes that may help.

 

 

Here is another video that may help explain the process

https://www.khanacad...-nervous-system


image.png?base_img=6&size=0&date_yr=2014   

There is no try. There is do and do not~Yoda

Losers quit when they fail. Winners fail until they succeed~Robert Kiyosak

Just one cigarette is exactly how every smoker on the planet started, and it is also how every single ex-smoker on the planet relapsed~Allen Carr

 


#56 Marti

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 07:00 PM

Chrys, I am so pleased you owned your quit. I am in the "re-start champix, but why" camp, but honestly if it works for you then go on and do it! Pleased you're feeling better. x


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#57 Chrysalis

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 07:06 PM

We have two major nervous systems 

1. CNS-central nervous system which is the brain and the spinal cord

2. PNS-peripheral nervous system which is all of the nerves that send messages to and recieve commands from, the CNS

 

Within the PNS there is a autonomic (automatic) division and a somatic (conscious) division. The part we are concerned with is the autonomic division which is divided further into the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems respectively. They are opposites. Sympathetic ramps up the body to deal with stressful situations like running away from a lion. The parasympathetic division is concerned with relaxing the body and is responsible for the digestion of food, etc.

 

Think of the running from the lion example for a moment. 

We see the lion and our Sympathetic response puts us into fight or flight which causes:

1. increased heart rate

2. increased blood pressure

3. increased breathing rate

4. increased vigilance (being "on guard")

5. Increased oxygen saturation

6. suppression of appetite

7. suppression of salivary glands (we have three: in the cheeks, below the tongue, and below the chin)

 

This response is synonymous with the stress response. The body is gearing up to deal with a difficult situation. Now, this sympathetic response could be due to seeing a lion, or taking a difficult exam, or giving a speech, etc. The response will always be the same.

 

Parasympathetic is the opposite. The two divisions balance each other because of the drive for homeostasis, which is "normal" or balance for the body. Parasympathetic will prepare us to rest and relax. The Vagus nerve is very important because it is the nerve that innervates (supplies sensation) to the internal organs which are used for digestion and elimination of waste (the vagus nerve supplies 75% of all parasympathetic fibers). The process of digestion is like a wave of automatic and regular impulses that propel the food we eat through our bodies and eventually out. It is slow, relaxed, and peaceful.

 

The parasympathetic division can be activated by relaxful situations like slow, measured breathing. I hope my explanation helped some. I have also linked a couple youtubes that may help.

 

 

Here is another video that may help explain the process

https://www.khanacad...-nervous-system

Thank you for your post and the video links, Eddo. That's one thing I love about this board-- so many smart and experienced people so generously sharing their knowledge.


Note to self: Even if I do smoke ONE cigarette and that ONE cigarette gives me relief from these AWFUL feelings, how long will that relief last? Forever? No, of course not. All day? No. An hour? Unlikely. I know perfectly well that the relief I feel, such as it is, will only last about 15 minutes before I'm right back to where I am now-- NEEDING just ONE cigarette to deal with these AWFUL feelings.  All right-- forget it! Forget the d*** cigarette! N.O.P.E.

 

image.png?base_img=3&size=0&date_yr=2014

 

2j3342d.jpg

 

 

 


#58 Mgarucci

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 12:10 AM

Chrysalis

The most effective tool is the truth.

Nicotine never has and never will relieve stress. This is a very well crafted marketing ploy started by the tobacco companies. In fact, smoking heightens stress levels and encourages chronic stress because of the effects it has on the body like: elevated blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate, etc. The stressful situations that you are referencing would be made worse by adding nicotine to the situation.The next time you feel stressed out try this method: take 4 slow and long deep breaths in through the nose and out through the mouth. It will work in 10 minutes or less and will work every time. The reason for this is because this deep breathing activates the Vagus nerve which is associated with the parasympathetic nervous system (rest and digest).

 

Believe

Ed

Ed,  Funny, I  have found myself unconsciously talking in very deep breaths and releasing many times throughout the day - and IT DOES HELP me - didn't understand why or my reasons for doing it. Thanks for the info!


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#59 Chrysalis

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 03:53 PM

Follow up---

 

Well, I have been taking the low dose of Chantix for just over a week now. All my craves stopped pretty much immediately. My conclusion is that it worked to avert my impending relapse. It also seems to be helping to reduce my stress eating (especially at night) so it is easier for me to stay within my calorie limit each day.

 

I met with my doctor this morning and we discussed me re-starting Chantix. He said that he thinks that most of the time the best way to handle stress is to get some exercise, even if that just means going out for a walk. But if the craves continue regardless of exercise and threaten my quit, he has no problem with the low dose Chantix. I told him that I expect to stay on it another 3 or 4 weeks until my mother's health crisis is over. He said that's fine. 

 

So there you have it, folks. I am happy with my decision, I kept my quit and my doctor is fine with it. I don't think this topic needs any more discussion.  


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Note to self: Even if I do smoke ONE cigarette and that ONE cigarette gives me relief from these AWFUL feelings, how long will that relief last? Forever? No, of course not. All day? No. An hour? Unlikely. I know perfectly well that the relief I feel, such as it is, will only last about 15 minutes before I'm right back to where I am now-- NEEDING just ONE cigarette to deal with these AWFUL feelings.  All right-- forget it! Forget the d*** cigarette! N.O.P.E.

 

image.png?base_img=3&size=0&date_yr=2014

 

2j3342d.jpg

 

 

 


#60 Miracle

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 08:40 PM

Just one more comment...I keep peeking in to check on you Chrysalis.  Very happy you seem to have made a good decision and are feeling better. 

 

Keep up the good work!  :)


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"However, it is essential that you remove this belief, because if you believe that you are dependent on nicotine, you will be, even after the little nicotine monster inside your body is dead. It is essential to remove all of the brainwashing."  Allen Carr, Easy Way to Quit Smoking, Chapter 24





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