Jump to content


Photo

Not smoking but restarting Chantix, anyway.


  • Please log in to reply
78 replies to this topic

#1 Chrysalis

Chrysalis

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,826 posts
  • quitdate:
    2014-03-28
  • LocationAtlanta, GA

Posted 12 August 2014 - 01:18 PM

I used Chantix to help me quit smoking more than 4 months ago. I am still not smoking (hooray!). But I think that I am going to start taking Chantix again. 

 

For reasons I do not understand, despite being more than 4 months away from cigarettes, I still want to smoke. I have to fight the urge to go buy some cigarettes all day every day. I haven't done it because my rational brain keeps reminding me of all the reasons I quit (very good reasons, by the way). But still, I WANT to smoke! 

 

Most people say that life without cigarettes gets better and better; the more distance you get from cigarettes the better you feel. That hasn't happened to me-- I don't feel better without smoking. I mean, yes, physically, my lungs are better and I don't cough any more. But MENTALLY? No. Mentally I feel better when I'm smoking. 

 

I remember when I first joined QSMB (lurking before I quit) somebody started a thread something like, "If you knew that cigarettes would not cause you any health problems, would you want to keep smoking?" almost everybody who replied to that thread said, "No!! I'm so happy to be free!" I said to myself then (and still do now) "Yes! I love smoking!" Even though I do now believe that smoking only relieves the withdrawal symptoms created by nicotine, that's OK with me. If I have to deliberately set up the addiction so that I can have the pleasure of satisfying that addiction, so be it. 

 

Obviously, this is all crazy thinking-- junkie thinking. I am now free of cigarettes and nicotine and have been for a while. Whyever would I even CONSIDER going back to smoking? But I also do not understand why I keep thinking obsessively about smoking and fighting the urge all day every day. Something is wrong here.

 

So rather than relapse I think I'm going to try taking Chantix again. Chantix is a psychotropic drug that did reduce my nicotine craving before, so maybe it will again. I'll take a low dose-- just 1/2 a pill once a day-- and see what happens. I never heard of anybody doing this before so it will be an experiment. I'll keep you posted as to how it goes. 


Note to self: Even if I do smoke ONE cigarette and that ONE cigarette gives me relief from these AWFUL feelings, how long will that relief last? Forever? No, of course not. All day? No. An hour? Unlikely. I know perfectly well that the relief I feel, such as it is, will only last about 15 minutes before I'm right back to where I am now-- NEEDING just ONE cigarette to deal with these AWFUL feelings.  All right-- forget it! Forget the d*** cigarette! N.O.P.E.

 

image.png?base_img=3&size=0&date_yr=2014

 

2j3342d.jpg

 

 

 


#2 lisawill

lisawill

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 383 posts
  • quitdate:
    2014-06-09
  • LocationNorth Carolina

Posted 12 August 2014 - 01:32 PM

Chris, its your quit and your decision. I am still taking .5mg of Chantix a day, had considered stopping them couple of days ago but just can't quite get my mind and emotions right just yet. I just know that if taking a tiny little pill once a day keeps me from smoking my lungs and brain out that it what I will do. I have thought about trying to do every other day for a couple of weeks. I think it is a personal choice and I know you will continue on this quit journey a nonsmoker for life.

 

I appreciate your honesty, I did in the beginning say to myself and to my husband that I know this is going to be hard. I loved smoking with him at night after a long day, during a weekend drink while socializing with friends, while taking a drive, etc.. I believe that you can continue YOUR quit by doing whatever it takes.

 

I support your decision and I am here if you need to talk or vent.


  • 2¢™ likes this

event.png
 


#3 SharonSiff

SharonSiff

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 535 posts
  • quitdate:
    06/12/13
  • LocationEssex, UK

Posted 12 August 2014 - 02:02 PM

I am so sad for you, it must be so frustrating. I will say it was nearly five months before I stopped craving a cigarette but that feeling just vanished..thank goodness!

You do whatever you feel will remove this feeling hanging over you. Have you discussed it yet with your doctor? Maybe he might suggest a mood enhancer? Not that I'm encouraging people to be on meds as I personally refused them myself 10 months into my quit, but for some it might really help.

I wish you well and hope you report back on how you are getting on and how it's all going.

It's strange isn't it when you feel like this because I understand that people say you are romancing a cig but it's not always a case of romancing the cig. It can, for some of us anyway, be a case of romancing a feeling of just feeling ' normal' again, if that makes sense.

Like I say all the best and I will follow this thread to see how it's going for you (((hugs)))

Edited to add: that in spite of this current mental problem you are experiencing it just shows how strong and committed to your quit you are, as you have not and am sure will not smoke. Please continue not to I did and am now 13 months free of the crap of it all- your 14 months will come.
  • 2¢™ and Mgarucci like this
1371036600_30_1_GBP_6.20_dark.png

The sun always shines down in my Rainbow Valley...Love Affair.

If your success is not on your own terms, if it looks good to the world but does not feel good in your heart, it is not success at all.  Anna Quindlen.

#4 bakon

bakon

    Pea Brain

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,469 posts
  • quitdate:
    9-24-12
  • LocationOwn World

Posted 12 August 2014 - 02:04 PM

I would not. You need mind set change not drug for physical withdrawal
  • avian3, Cristobal, skillfulabbot and 2 others like this

Starting Now
Keep Marching.

 

 


#5 Chrysalis

Chrysalis

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,826 posts
  • quitdate:
    2014-03-28
  • LocationAtlanta, GA

Posted 12 August 2014 - 02:14 PM

I would not. You need mind set change not drug for physical withdrawal

If the problem is neurochemical, Chantix (or perhaps another psychotropic drug) will fix it. If the problem is "mind set", no drug will fix it. I don't know which I am dealing with. Hence the experiment. I'll let you know how it turns out.


  • SharonSiff, 2¢™ and Mgarucci like this

Note to self: Even if I do smoke ONE cigarette and that ONE cigarette gives me relief from these AWFUL feelings, how long will that relief last? Forever? No, of course not. All day? No. An hour? Unlikely. I know perfectly well that the relief I feel, such as it is, will only last about 15 minutes before I'm right back to where I am now-- NEEDING just ONE cigarette to deal with these AWFUL feelings.  All right-- forget it! Forget the d*** cigarette! N.O.P.E.

 

image.png?base_img=3&size=0&date_yr=2014

 

2j3342d.jpg

 

 

 


#6 marciem

marciem

    Status: Legitimate Member of Team QSMB 2012NoSmoWarriors

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,378 posts

Posted 12 August 2014 - 02:37 PM

Have you spoken with your physician about this, Chrysallis?  With so many possible side effects that Chantix has, and the fact that you are no longer addicted to nicotine... well I just worry about taking a drug for something that isn't there.

 

Nobody ever said the road to freedom was a straight line from crappy to great... are you sure you're struggling each and every day, or does it just feel that way sometimes?  That would be a normal progression, having golden days interspersed with rotten... it seems you have described some good ones.

 

I forget that quote, the one about being right at the edge of success and turning back before getting there.  I worry that starting the drug again is by way of prolonging your journey to complete success.  My journey for sure has been a long one, I couldn't call anything really comfortable until after six months... "Where's this freakin' freedom they keep talking about?  All I think about is cigarettes and quitting and etc. etc. smoking related... that's not free grrrrr".


  • bakon likes this

Quit Date 9/20/12
event.png
image.png?base_img=2&size=0&date_yr=2012
Honorary member of:87d3d921fc.png

S.moking is N.ot an O.ption T.oday
Better to be a nonsmoker with an occasional desire to smoke, than a smoker with a constant desire to quit.
Remember: everything bad about quitting is temporary, and everything good about quitting is permanent. TimidTulip
Not a day will ever go by that life is 100% perfect. But 100% of the days are better not smoking jwg
I feel no matter my outcome, quitting was still hands down the best thing I ever did....r.i.p. jwg 12/28/13
Like John, no matter my own outcome, quitting smoking is hands down the best thing I've ever done... mlm 2/16/17                                                       


#7 Miracle

Miracle

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,578 posts
  • quitdate:
    2014-05-23

Posted 12 August 2014 - 02:53 PM

Aw Chrysalis.  I'm sad to read your words.  :(  We all know what it's like to have nagging thoughts like you're having. 

 

I'm hoping maybe you are just having a bad short run in No Man's Land, and all will improve with a little more time.

 

Ring your doctor and discuss whether Chantix is the right answer, or maybe something different.

 

You know everyone on this board is here for you and happy you are still planning to keep your quit.  Do whatever it takes to keep that ticker running upward. 


6pdz9qeyh.png

1400905800_20_1_USD_4_default.png

 

"However, it is essential that you remove this belief, because if you believe that you are dependent on nicotine, you will be, even after the little nicotine monster inside your body is dead. It is essential to remove all of the brainwashing."  Allen Carr, Easy Way to Quit Smoking, Chapter 24


#8 Cristobal

Cristobal

    A Very Happy & Free Non-Smoker ... ¡ N.O.P.E. !

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,300 posts
  • quitdate:
    2012-10-14
  • LocationBaja California Peninsula, México.

Posted 12 August 2014 - 02:58 PM

Why do you want to smoke ???

There must be a reason, perhaps you have not thought enough about this.


The Champix/Chantix will not help at all, and I will explain why:

After 4 months all, or almost all, of your acetylcholine nicotine receptors in your brain have gone completely to sleep, so they are not physical withdrawl symptoms you are experiencing. The phase of experiencing any significant withdrawl symptoms ended at least 2 months ago. Medical science completely supports my explanation.

Champix/Chantix cannot help you in any way at this stage of your quit.

This is now a completely mental and emotional game, discard completely any physical reason as to why you want to smoke still.


One rule of life is that we will not want to do things, that we believe have a negative consequence...and this true in the reverse as well.

For example:

We will not even think to drink a large glass of battery acid, because we know it will kill us.

We would drink it only if we wanted to commit suicide (a perceived 'positive' benefit).

It is the same with smoking.


You still perceive a 'positive' benefit to the addiction.

Now ask yourself, what is it ???


Once you have identified it, it will be much easier to see the lie logically, overcome it, and then continue your quit journey.


Cristóbal
► I am a ** OLDE PHARTE ** (1 year + :grin: ) !!!
► I smoked 30 years, 2 packs a day ... Bleah ..... :shock: :shock: :shock:
► 14 October 2012 - ¡ This day I took control .... and took back my freedom ! :grin: :grin: :grin:

► ¡ Cold Turkey On A Whim ! :lol: :lol: :lol:
¿¿ How to quit and *STAY* quit ??
¡¡¡ Rocket Science !!! (N.O.P.E. - Not.One.Puff.Ever .... Just For Today)

My Quit & First Post: http://www.quitsmoki...php?f=2&t=46786


Posted Image

#9 Radar_Mama

Radar_Mama

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,358 posts
  • quitdate:
    2014-05-13
  • LocationCanada

Posted 12 August 2014 - 02:59 PM

Chrysalis, I'm sorry to hear you're struggling now.  

 

I'm wondering if what's going on with you isn't a reaction to all the stress and worry in your life right now?  I know your mom is suffering and you're having a lot of stress and fear and worry for her.  For decades, smoking was the go-to stress reaction, it became automatic.  I'm wondering if, now that you're in an intensely stressful and worrying time, that your mind isn't automatically seeking 'relief' from smoking and telling you that's what you need?

 

In any event, my first reaction on seeing your post is to admire your strength and commitment to not smoking.  You are struggling every day with not only personal stress and worry, but also the urge to buy cigarettes.  Yet you don't do it. Every day you choose not to smoke.  Now you are considering Chantix again.  You are to be commended for all the effort and commitment you have, Chrys.

 

Hugs to you! 


  • lisawill, 2¢™ and Miracle like this

image.png?base_img=5&size=0&date_yr=2014

 

Proud to be a 2014 Avenger!

 

 


#10 Chrysalis

Chrysalis

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,826 posts
  • quitdate:
    2014-03-28
  • LocationAtlanta, GA

Posted 12 August 2014 - 03:02 PM

Marciem, I don't know what is the best thing to do in a case like this. I don't think that anybody knows. I know that many people take Chantix for 6 months or longer as long as they don't have any severe side effects, so there is nothing inherently toxic about Chantix. Let's not complicate the issue by confusing a personal preference against relying on a "medicinal crutch" with an assertion that the medication itself is toxic. Those are very different things.

 

I will say that I have posted a couple of times (including today) about the need to help former quitters recognize when they are flirting with relapsing and helping them find some way to stop before it is too late. There are way too many people who start out quitting but then relapse. Perhaps the reason they relapse is because they went through what I am going through-- a chronic and corrosive desire to smoke even if your rational brain tells you that's foolish. 

 

I could, as you recommend, continue to fight this feeling and resist the impulse to go buy cigarettes in the hope and expectation that some day the desire will stop. But I think that that's what most former smokers (and former addicts) do-- they hold on and hold on and hold on until the day comes that they can't hold on. Then they relapse. So, yes, with time the desire might stop-- or I might join the majority of former smokers and relapse. I don't want to risk a relapse so I'm going to try this drug. 

 

Luckily, I have a doctor's appointment next week. I will take the Chantix for a week and then be able to report to my doctor what happened and we can discuss next steps. 

 

I truly believe that we need to do more to help prevent relapses. I feel that I am a candidate to relapse so this is what I am trying for now. 


  • SharonSiff, sarry, Radar_Mama and 2 others like this

Note to self: Even if I do smoke ONE cigarette and that ONE cigarette gives me relief from these AWFUL feelings, how long will that relief last? Forever? No, of course not. All day? No. An hour? Unlikely. I know perfectly well that the relief I feel, such as it is, will only last about 15 minutes before I'm right back to where I am now-- NEEDING just ONE cigarette to deal with these AWFUL feelings.  All right-- forget it! Forget the d*** cigarette! N.O.P.E.

 

image.png?base_img=3&size=0&date_yr=2014

 

2j3342d.jpg

 

 

 


#11 SharonSiff

SharonSiff

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 535 posts
  • quitdate:
    06/12/13
  • LocationEssex, UK

Posted 12 August 2014 - 03:10 PM

I am so glad you have made an appointment to see your doctor and think that is a very sensible thing to do.

There is a big difference between sulking due to not having a cig and it just not feeling right inside isn't there? I look forward to hearing how you get on with the doctor. Chin up my lovely xx
1371036600_30_1_GBP_6.20_dark.png

The sun always shines down in my Rainbow Valley...Love Affair.

If your success is not on your own terms, if it looks good to the world but does not feel good in your heart, it is not success at all.  Anna Quindlen.

#12 Chrysalis

Chrysalis

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,826 posts
  • quitdate:
    2014-03-28
  • LocationAtlanta, GA

Posted 12 August 2014 - 03:21 PM

Cristobal, I agree that the nicotine is long gone from my system but that doesn't mean that my problem is not physiological. In the first place, we know that there are many, many chemicals in cigarette smoke that may have had an effect on our brain chemistry. I have read a few reports (which I don't really trust) that cigarette smoke contains MAOI antidepressant activity. So if somebody quits smoking their underlying depression may suddenly become apparent. So we don't know all that goes on with the body, the brain and cigarette smoke.  

 

But more than that, we KNOW that most people who quit smoking relapse. Sometimes after months or years. Why is that? Why are we refusing to address that? I am telling you that I feel that I am in danger of relapsing. I have frequently thought of going to buy cigarettes all during the last 4 months and the thoughts have been daily for the last few weeks (and yes, Radar_Mama, that is probably related to my personal stress). Rather than tell me not to do ANYTHING except keep resisting the desire to smoke, maybe we should be trying to think of some other way to prevent relapsing. If not Chantix, perhaps a different drug. If not a drug, then perhaps some behavioral approach. But the same old response (hang in there) to the same old problem (temptation to smoke) is likely to get the same old outcome (66% relapsing).

 

What do I think I will gain by smoking? I know the answer to that. I will gain the feeling of drawing the smoke into my lungs and feeling the immediate surge of release from stress. Yes, the stress might be from the nicotine withdrawal itself. Yes, the relief will be temporary. But to me, the feeling itself and my ability to have that feeling any time I want is priceless. I miss it. I miss it every day. Anybody have any solution for me other than "hang on and don't smoke"? As marciem said,  "Where's this freakin' freedom they keep talking about?  All I think about is cigarettes and quitting and etc. etc. smoking related... that's not free grrrrr".


  • dentalfloss, Radar_Mama and Mgarucci like this

Note to self: Even if I do smoke ONE cigarette and that ONE cigarette gives me relief from these AWFUL feelings, how long will that relief last? Forever? No, of course not. All day? No. An hour? Unlikely. I know perfectly well that the relief I feel, such as it is, will only last about 15 minutes before I'm right back to where I am now-- NEEDING just ONE cigarette to deal with these AWFUL feelings.  All right-- forget it! Forget the d*** cigarette! N.O.P.E.

 

image.png?base_img=3&size=0&date_yr=2014

 

2j3342d.jpg

 

 

 


#13 bakon

bakon

    Pea Brain

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,469 posts
  • quitdate:
    9-24-12
  • LocationOwn World

Posted 12 August 2014 - 03:34 PM

read yur own signature. why dull the brain into feeling it has nicotine? that's all Chantix does, blocks and fires off receptors so they cant accept nicotine. your past that.


  • Cristobal likes this

Starting Now
Keep Marching.

 

 


#14 marciem

marciem

    Status: Legitimate Member of Team QSMB 2012NoSmoWarriors

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,378 posts

Posted 12 August 2014 - 03:45 PM

Chrysalis... I completely respect your decision to do what you need to do to keep from smoking.  I was just concerned about using a drug for something that isn't there.  I do NOT know all that much about Chantix (my understanding was it filled up the nicotine receptors so that there was less desire to smoke, and little or no relief of withdrawal from smoking... something like that), and none of us knows all there is to know about the effects of all the stuff in smoke other than nicotine on our brains.

 

I get where you're coming from on relapse prevention.

 

Try stapling a chicken to your forehead.  It has been rumored for years  to be an effective quit method... 

At least you wouldn't be thinking about smoking with that painful staple and that dangling chicken on your face.

You might have a tough time explaining it to your doctor though, sooooo........ nevermind :D

 

I'm glad you're seeing your doc soon, and hope everything gets straightened out for you. 


Quit Date 9/20/12
event.png
image.png?base_img=2&size=0&date_yr=2012
Honorary member of:87d3d921fc.png

S.moking is N.ot an O.ption T.oday
Better to be a nonsmoker with an occasional desire to smoke, than a smoker with a constant desire to quit.
Remember: everything bad about quitting is temporary, and everything good about quitting is permanent. TimidTulip
Not a day will ever go by that life is 100% perfect. But 100% of the days are better not smoking jwg
I feel no matter my outcome, quitting was still hands down the best thing I ever did....r.i.p. jwg 12/28/13
Like John, no matter my own outcome, quitting smoking is hands down the best thing I've ever done... mlm 2/16/17                                                       


#15 Chrysalis

Chrysalis

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,826 posts
  • quitdate:
    2014-03-28
  • LocationAtlanta, GA

Posted 12 August 2014 - 03:46 PM

read yur own signature. why dull the brain into feeling it has nicotine? that's all Chantix does, blocks and fires off receptors so they cant accept nicotine. your past that.

[Actually, something happened to my QSMB account a few months ago so that I can no longer see anybody's signature, including my own. Very frustrating. But at least I do remember what my signature says.  :)]  As for the Chantix, I don't think anybody knows "all that Chantix does". Neurochemistry is such a complex field and so many things--both physiological and psychological--can influence brain chemistry. It's all still a black box. My purpose now is to find out for myself what Chantix can do for me now, if anything. You might be right. If all Chantix does is displace nicotine, it probably won't help me. 


Note to self: Even if I do smoke ONE cigarette and that ONE cigarette gives me relief from these AWFUL feelings, how long will that relief last? Forever? No, of course not. All day? No. An hour? Unlikely. I know perfectly well that the relief I feel, such as it is, will only last about 15 minutes before I'm right back to where I am now-- NEEDING just ONE cigarette to deal with these AWFUL feelings.  All right-- forget it! Forget the d*** cigarette! N.O.P.E.

 

image.png?base_img=3&size=0&date_yr=2014

 

2j3342d.jpg

 

 

 


#16 marciem

marciem

    Status: Legitimate Member of Team QSMB 2012NoSmoWarriors

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,378 posts

Posted 12 August 2014 - 03:50 PM

 

 

I know the answer to that. I will gain the feeling of drawing the smoke into my lungs and feeling the immediate surge of release from stress. Yes, the stress might be from the nicotine withdrawal itself. Yes, the relief will be temporary.

Regarding your answer to Cristobal.  

 

WRONG ON ALL COUNTS.

 

You haven't smoked in four months.  You will cough and hack and feel miserable at that first draw of smoke.  You will NOT feel any immediate surge of release from stress.    You will not have relief.

 

How do I know that?  I am the relapse queen, that's how.  It is nasty and disgusting and all a smoke will make you feel is nasty and disgusting and will lower your own self esteem by 10 notches for going on that quest when you've seen it written over and over here by relapsers how nasty and disgusting that relapse cigarette is.  You need to go back and read some of them, they all say the same thing.  

 

So... rethink the questions again, and try to come up with different answers, since yours are currently incorrect.  Change your mind to change your life, hon.


  • fizzie and abbey130 like this

Quit Date 9/20/12
event.png
image.png?base_img=2&size=0&date_yr=2012
Honorary member of:87d3d921fc.png

S.moking is N.ot an O.ption T.oday
Better to be a nonsmoker with an occasional desire to smoke, than a smoker with a constant desire to quit.
Remember: everything bad about quitting is temporary, and everything good about quitting is permanent. TimidTulip
Not a day will ever go by that life is 100% perfect. But 100% of the days are better not smoking jwg
I feel no matter my outcome, quitting was still hands down the best thing I ever did....r.i.p. jwg 12/28/13
Like John, no matter my own outcome, quitting smoking is hands down the best thing I've ever done... mlm 2/16/17                                                       


#17 Cristobal

Cristobal

    A Very Happy & Free Non-Smoker ... ¡ N.O.P.E. !

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,300 posts
  • quitdate:
    2012-10-14
  • LocationBaja California Peninsula, México.

Posted 12 August 2014 - 03:51 PM

You want to smoke because you still believe smoking offers you benefits.

It is this simple.

Champix/chantix will do nothing for you.

Zero.

It will not help your mind, only truths about the lies the addiction tells you can do this.

I say this in the most sincere and caring way possible.



Education will make you free, not a drug.


Cristóbal
► I am a ** OLDE PHARTE ** (1 year + :grin: ) !!!
► I smoked 30 years, 2 packs a day ... Bleah ..... :shock: :shock: :shock:
► 14 October 2012 - ¡ This day I took control .... and took back my freedom ! :grin: :grin: :grin:

► ¡ Cold Turkey On A Whim ! :lol: :lol: :lol:
¿¿ How to quit and *STAY* quit ??
¡¡¡ Rocket Science !!! (N.O.P.E. - Not.One.Puff.Ever .... Just For Today)

My Quit & First Post: http://www.quitsmoki...php?f=2&t=46786


Posted Image

#18 Chrysalis

Chrysalis

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,826 posts
  • quitdate:
    2014-03-28
  • LocationAtlanta, GA

Posted 12 August 2014 - 04:07 PM

...Champix/chantix will do nothing for you. Zero....

 

You might be right. Time will tell.


Note to self: Even if I do smoke ONE cigarette and that ONE cigarette gives me relief from these AWFUL feelings, how long will that relief last? Forever? No, of course not. All day? No. An hour? Unlikely. I know perfectly well that the relief I feel, such as it is, will only last about 15 minutes before I'm right back to where I am now-- NEEDING just ONE cigarette to deal with these AWFUL feelings.  All right-- forget it! Forget the d*** cigarette! N.O.P.E.

 

image.png?base_img=3&size=0&date_yr=2014

 

2j3342d.jpg

 

 

 


#19 Chrysalis

Chrysalis

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,826 posts
  • quitdate:
    2014-03-28
  • LocationAtlanta, GA

Posted 12 August 2014 - 04:09 PM

Nancy fixed my problem!! I can now see everybody's signature line, including my own! Thank you, Nancy. 

 

Now I can set about installing a quit meter so that I can continue to track my progress and the money I'm saving. I DO intend to keep protecting my quit forever-- that's  what this thread is all about. 


  • Nancy., Beacon and SharonSiff like this

Note to self: Even if I do smoke ONE cigarette and that ONE cigarette gives me relief from these AWFUL feelings, how long will that relief last? Forever? No, of course not. All day? No. An hour? Unlikely. I know perfectly well that the relief I feel, such as it is, will only last about 15 minutes before I'm right back to where I am now-- NEEDING just ONE cigarette to deal with these AWFUL feelings.  All right-- forget it! Forget the d*** cigarette! N.O.P.E.

 

image.png?base_img=3&size=0&date_yr=2014

 

2j3342d.jpg

 

 

 


#20 SharonSiff

SharonSiff

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 535 posts
  • quitdate:
    06/12/13
  • LocationEssex, UK

Posted 12 August 2014 - 04:49 PM

You want to smoke because you still believe smoking offers you benefits.It is this simple.Champix/chantix will do nothing for you.Zero.It will not help your mind, only truths about the lies the addiction tells you can do this.I say this in the most sincere and caring way possible.Education will make you free, not a drug.Cristóbal


In Chrysaslis case you may be right on this...time will tell Cris but I'm really sorry but I don't agree with you when you say a drug won't help. My uncle suffers from scizophrenia and admittedly was already on prescribed drugs. In his second and successful attempt his specialist doctor increased and tweaked his drugs for him, the difference was chalk and cheese for him. I am pleased to say he is 14 years strong and has never even fancied a cigarette once.

So while I do understand that for some people it can be a simple case of change of mind set and education but that really can be no use, nor ornament for those who are sadly are left with faulty serotonin receptor problems- sadly that seems to be what may be happening? I really think mood disorders, anxiety disorders and other states of mind should always be assessed and treated by experts as there is clearly more going on than a simple romancing the cig and lack of education, far too many people fail for that to be the only reason to gain a peaceful state of mind. I speak from experience as stopping cigs highlighted an undiagnosed mental condition for me.

Maybe chantix won't help while she's waiting for the doctor but if it is true that for some that it can also act as a mini mood stabiliser then I can see why anyone would try it.

I am obviously just giving my opinion based on both mine and my uncles mental health.
  • Law712 likes this
1371036600_30_1_GBP_6.20_dark.png

The sun always shines down in my Rainbow Valley...Love Affair.

If your success is not on your own terms, if it looks good to the world but does not feel good in your heart, it is not success at all.  Anna Quindlen.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users