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Is it weird to stop smoking without trying?


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#21 less552000

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 07:18 AM

  my name is Les. and I'm 54 years old. I was steeling my parents cigarettes when I was around 10. My mother bought me my first carton of cigarettes when I was thirteen for Christmas. So for 41 years I was A 2+ pack smoker per day. My health was deteriorating. I could barely breath. I had difficulty lying down to extreme coughing and lots of spitting of mucus. I have had 2 fem-pops. This is a femoral to lateral popatial by-pass on my left leg. they thought I had burgers disease from smoking. My first one was when I was 28 years old. the second one was when I was around 45. I still could not stop smoking. I've tried hypnosis, patches, gum, lozenges, chantex. Chantex started to work on week one but I ended up in the ER from allergic reactions. Then on morning of Sept. 28, 2016 I woke up in the morning and all urges to smoke were gone. No cravings no nothing. I still don't smoke and hope and pray it stays this way. From what I've learned it could be brain damage from a small stroke that happened right in the area of the brain that causes the cravings, plugging the receptors, or it's just gods intervention, I truly don't know what happened but I'm glad it did. I would dare to say, no, it's not weird, just be glad it happened.  



#22 Jillar

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Posted 07 February 2017 - 05:52 AM

Welcome less, congratulations on that awesome quit you have going. You were obviously ready to quit :)

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5vbuwn.jpg
Things began to get better when I realized I would remain quit even if things never got any better.

Christian99 15 Years
QuitWe say here that it is better to be a nonsmoker with the occasional desire to smoke than a smoker with the constant desire to quit. Marciem
Always keep in mind, you are not going through this because you quit...you are going through this because you smoked. Nancy
Being successful doesn't mean that you'll never GET to smoke again. It means that you'll never HAVE to smoke again.


#23 less552000

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 01:40 AM

Thank you Jillar. Yes I guess I was ready. I was ready for probly the last 20 years of my life. One thing I have learned is that most all smokers are always ready and willing, but the will is a lot weaker then the ready. I also figured out that most doctors and many people (non-smokers) don't understand the word addiction, most smokers do. My wife for an example had a bilateral mastectomy, along with 16 glands under her arm removed. Out of those 16, 12 were cancerous. Out of 17 chemo treatments she has 5 left then faces 16 doses of radiation, and yes, she continues to smoke. I have watched her cry thinking she is dying from cancer, praying to stop smoking and just can't. I would dare say she was ready when she was told she had cancer. I don't know how to help her. I know it's hard, I've been there.  



#24 Jillar

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 02:42 AM

So sorry to hear this less. Maybe she could get on here for support like you have done? If you get a chance why don't you introduce yourself on the main board as these sub forums don't get a lot of views. My thoughts are with your wife that she will be cancer free.

image.png?base_img=5&size=0&date_yr=2016



 


5vbuwn.jpg
Things began to get better when I realized I would remain quit even if things never got any better.

Christian99 15 Years
QuitWe say here that it is better to be a nonsmoker with the occasional desire to smoke than a smoker with the constant desire to quit. Marciem
Always keep in mind, you are not going through this because you quit...you are going through this because you smoked. Nancy
Being successful doesn't mean that you'll never GET to smoke again. It means that you'll never HAVE to smoke again.


#25 T.C.

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 03:59 PM

Ironic isn't it?  I have just been talking to someone about this very topic.

 

I have been out with a colleague on a job today.  We both used to work together for another firm and have once again ended up working together but coincidentally with our respective new firm.

 

Anyway, we came out of a meeting and she burst into flames and lit up and realised that I was not doing the same as I was still smoking when we worked together previously.

 

She told me that she liked the idea of quitting and asked how I gave up and how hard was it.

 

So I explained that one Friday night after my evening meal, I lit up as usual, took about 3 puffs and thought to myself "I really am not enjoying this" so I stubbed it out and decided on the spur of the moment to see how long I could go before I was craving and climbing the wall.....

 

That was over 18 months ago (2 years at the end of April) and not once did I have any cravings.  I had physical withdrawl symptoms for sure, but not once did I ever think that I really needed to smoke or have any desire to smoke.

 

Now bearing in mind that I had been a 20+ a day smoker for 30+ years, when I quit I really doubted if I would get that far into the quit.

 

I often wonder if I would have found it so easy had I for instance made it a new year resolution and built up to it rather than the spur of the moment decision.

 

Who knows?  Who cares?  The fact is, I, the long term smoker with the most minimal of will power did it with ease.  So I am not afraid to tell people, If I can do it, they can do it too :mrgreen:


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#26 CanadianMedStudent

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 04:06 PM

I found this old forum post and made an account to share this. Nicotine is one of the most addictive substances on the planet. If you find yourself suddenly easily able to quit smoking, I would see a doctor. You could have early stages of pneumonia or something more sinister interfering with the way you breathe in and process nicotine. This isn't to scare one, I genuinely hope me sharing this will benefit someone's life one day. Cheers

#27 avian3

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 04:48 PM

I'm still here, nearly 7 years later


QUIT September 14, 2010
 
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#28 Reisen

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 08:05 AM

I'm still lurking from time to time, too! ¦3

 

Which reminds me, I should perhaps update my profile, heh.

 

Also, my money-saved counter is out of whack. Cigarettes have become more expensive twice since the time I've quit.


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(My currency is actually Euros, not Dollars)
Counter since last cigarette with seconds resolution
(Opens external site with the counter)
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#29 MiekeLucian

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 01:43 AM

I am 39 years old. Im on my 26 days cold turkey. and It's been a long 26 days, hard menthol candies sustains me and a lot of fruit juices and water to supress my cravings. Smoker for 19 years. My only motivation to quit are my kids, I do not want them to grow up seeing their Dad as a smoker (since i am the only 1 in the house who smokes) I dont use any substitute for nicotine, i have my share of anxiety, and throat infection and i read from other articles is that there is no easy way out when a person wants to quit smoking. I dont want to go back to smoking.


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#30 Jillar

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 01:59 AM

Welcome Mieke, congrats on 26 days smoke free :) Why don't you start a thread on the main board and introduce yourself? I know there's a bunch of members who would like to welcome you too and these sub forums don't seem to get as many views :)

image.png?base_img=5&size=0&date_yr=2016



 


5vbuwn.jpg
Things began to get better when I realized I would remain quit even if things never got any better.

Christian99 15 Years
QuitWe say here that it is better to be a nonsmoker with the occasional desire to smoke than a smoker with the constant desire to quit. Marciem
Always keep in mind, you are not going through this because you quit...you are going through this because you smoked. Nancy
Being successful doesn't mean that you'll never GET to smoke again. It means that you'll never HAVE to smoke again.





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