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Is it weird to stop smoking without trying?


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#1 NickMan7

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 05:30 AM

Hi there - new to this great forum after sitting in the shadows reading personal struggles for a few days.. :D

Quickly, a little background on me - I am 31 and I've been smoking for 9 years. Started at about a pack per day and graduated to around two packs per day (or more, occasionally) 3 or 4 years ago - basically a chain smoker. My partner also smokes and I've had to budget $500-$600 per month to keep up with our habit and the ever-increasing tobacco taxes here in Colorado ($49-$60+ per carton). In the weeks since I stopped smoking (read below), I've easily saved $400-$500. My partner still smokes, although he is at about 10-12 cigarettes per day and is working diligently to wean himself off cold turkey.

Origin of my question in the subject line:

I became quite sick back in mid-January with some strange strain of this year's flu. I was out of work for a week and was barely functional, both physically and mentally. As most smokers I know do, I continue to smoke even when I don't feel well and I did so back in January, as I normally would. On the Monday following my sick week, I woke up and simply did not want a cigarette. Out of habit, I ALWAYS want a smoke the second I wake up (among other triggers such as driving, alcohol, and meals). Not that Monday. And not since then. I am about to wrap up 7 weeks of not smoking. Not one craving. Not one symptom of withdrawal. Not one thought. Not one reach for the pocket. Absolutely nothing. A light switch turned from on to off.. overnight.

Obviously, this is a gift given to me that I could've only dreamed about and I am absolutely not complaining, but.. is it weird? Will everything come crashing down months from now after I think I've made it? If someone would've asked me before that Monday if I'd ever quit, I would've answered "No. I have wanted to for years and will always want to, but I'll never be able to. Only because I know it's bad for me, though, not because I don't enjoy it." I will admit that, although I've had zero desire to smoke since that day, I do have a highly subconscious sense of sadness, a sense that something is wrong; maybe "wrong" isn't the right word. I am a very happy person and I live a wonderful life, but ever since that last smoke, something's definitely been off. I assume it will wear off with time, but not smoking is the only thing that comes to mind that would explain the sense of sadness I've been enduring. It's not a depressing sadness, though - just a faint, lingering feeling. So hard to explain it and I'll stop with the adjectives here. :roll:

I'd love to hear from others who've had something similar happen with them, if anyone here has. How long has it been for you? Did you ever go through withdrawals or did it just go away like mine has? Just curious how unusual (or usual!) this is..
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#2 markstopsmoking

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 09:48 AM

It's not really weird to stop smoking without really trying very hard, as to stop that starts with the correct mindset, and that alone is enough to carry you through.

As a heavy smoker, it's incredibly weird to stop without any symptoms of withdrawal, cravings, or thoughts about smoking, you are an anomaly, you should go have your brain scanned, maybe you have no Acetylcholine Nicotinic receptors in your brain. I'm sure they would be interested in studying you and mapping your genes for rare variants.
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#3 Guest__*

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 11:13 AM

I'm guessing there are 3 possibilities.

1. you were never actually addicted.
2. Your body flushes nicotine out of your system virtually instantly
3. You are a robot from the planet ZX81 and are here to destory all humanity.

#4 Stephanie

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 11:15 AM

I think your mind is just made up about it, really "trying" is not great vocabulary so I think you have your mindset right where it should be. You just want to quit more than you want to smoke, from my experience, we all get our turn around here, the thing that tests us, but I think it is normal and OK, you just want it and success is based on how we perceive our feelings about smoking.


Good job!

Steph
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#5 Bradley Parker

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 01:09 PM

Hey hey,

it was meant to be.

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#6 Sardi

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 09:12 PM

Wow, I'm so fascinated... and jealous! ;) The brain is really something else, and it's still basically a mystery. I've been told I'm an anomaly by several doctors. I have ms and have over 100 lesions all over my brain yet am virtually asymptomatic. There was one rather tactless doctor who told me he was surprised I wasn't in a wheelchair. Neuroplasticity I think is the word. The brain can make up for deficits by creating new pathways/detours, or that's my understanding. Should really go look it up. I wouldn't know how to apply that to your case bc I still have a lot to learn about nicotine addiction. I'm sure there are others who had the same situation, maybe you want to post on the main board where more people can see it.

The sadness is, sadly, very relatable. Psychologists love to say how we cling to the familiar to explain why we are drawn to certain self-destructive relationships, habits, blah blah blah. So you just lost something very close to you, without any prior thought or preparation. (lucky dog! :) ) Can't remember how long you said you've been nicotine free but make a point to challenge yourself so you can discover all the positive changes and watch it turn to gratitude!

Happy for you!
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#7 NickMan7

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 01:03 AM

Wow, I'm so fascinated... and jealous! ;) The brain is really something else, and it's still basically a mystery. I've been told I'm an anomaly by several doctors. I have ms and have over 100 lesions all over my brain yet am virtually asymptomatic. There was one rather tactless doctor who told me he was surprised I wasn't in a wheelchair. Neuroplasticity I think is the word. The brain can make up for deficits by creating new pathways/detours, or that's my understanding. Should really go look it up. I wouldn't know how to apply that to your case bc I still have a lot to learn about nicotine addiction. I'm sure there are others who had the same situation, maybe you want to post on the main board where more people can see it.

The sadness is, sadly, very relatable. Psychologists love to say how we cling to the familiar to explain why we are drawn to certain self-destructive relationships, habits, blah blah blah. So you just lost something very close to you, without any prior thought or preparation. (lucky dog! :) ) Can't remember how long you said you've been nicotine free but make a point to challenge yourself so you can discover all the positive changes and watch it turn to gratitude!

Happy for you!


Thank you! Someone mentioned that it's possible I was never addicted in the first place which, truthfully, seems quite logical in hindsight. During the 9 years I smoked, I enjoyed SO, SO MUCH the action of smoking, but I did not necessarily crave it or get restless thinking about the next one. My main triggers were definitely driving and eating, but not because I craved it - more because I associated the act of driving or finishing a meal with smoking a cigarette. Long, intense conversation and a glass of wine were also main triggers, but again, not necessarily by way of craving.

Sometimes the human body shocks and awes and I think this is the case. There may not be a clear-cut explanation for it and I'm certainly not going to spend money for the doctor to try and figure out why. Just working on getting healthier and RICHER. :)
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#8 noodle8a

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 08:10 AM

hello,I too have the same concearn...after smoking for 6plus years,two weeks ago ,all of a sudden i realized that i hadnt smoked in some days,not even while driving...i cant figure out why and it seems very weird but i have no urges or withdrawl symptoms at all.I just think its so odd and freaky. Last week i got out og work sooo tired and lit up a ciggy to see if it would help,as it always did but, took one puff and just couldnt,so i trew it away...I also went on a road trip and drove for hours I bought my pack just knowing I would need it but did not have an urge to smoke at all...is this weird or am i just weird???? I still have my same daily routines ,still stressed out like crazy but no urges...could this be something medical?

#9 Puff the MD

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 05:37 AM

One of my dearest friend's mother died from lung cancer. My friend tells me that pretty much as soon as she heard her diagnosis, she lost all desire to smoke. It wasn't a conscious decision and she knew at the time she was terminal. She could have said "to hell with it" and continued to smoke, she wouldn't have lived any longer or died any sooner. She just lost interest. Something obviously changed in her perception of the cigarette, probably deep at the subconscious level and that was that.

For those of you who just woke up and lost your desire to smoke, well I say "who cares why." I'm still smoking and am gearing up for a quit on Monday. And I and any other person still smoking would LOVE to just wake up with no desire.

Stop worrying about it. I don't think there is any medical condition in existence that includes the symptom sudden loss of urge to smoke cigarettes. In the words of Arnold Schwarzenegger "It's not a tumour." :lol:

I used to be what one might call a pot head. I smoked it every single day. While I still do not believe that marijuana is in any way physically addicting, for a while there, psychologically I just felt I could not do without it. Today I rarely smoke it. Once or twice a year tops and only if it's around. I'd never seek it out. At some point, and I can't even tell you when exactly, I just stopped smoking it. I don't know why or what changed. It's no different really. While I do believe there is a physical addiction component to nicotine, I also think it's probably 95% psychological as well.

One time some years ago I was out with a friend (ironically the same one mentioned above, but it was before his mother's diagnosis). I have not seen him do this any time before or since, but that night he was stinking drunk (as was I). This was before I started smoking as well. Both non smokers, we drunkards chain smoked all night long. Neither of us started smoking the next day. He NEVER did and I didn't until many years later. Although I'm sure we both felt nicotine withdrawal the next morning, we probably chalked up that foreign sensation to a severe hangover and never thought anything of it.

My point is that the physical withdrawal of nicotine is so incidental, such a small part of the reason we continue to smoke, that it goes unnoticed by many. The only reason it seems so severe to those trying to quit smoking is because it then becomes our main focus of attention. And as someone who suffers from anxiety can tell you, you can make any minor bodily sensation seem like a life threatening crisis if you continue to fixate on it.

I've had other friends tell me during busy time in life that they realized after a couple of days that they hadn't smoked at all. They were simply to preoccupied for it to even enter their mind. This could also be what happened with you guys.

In short, don't look a gift horse in the mouth. LOL.

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He was such a stupid git." - The Beatles

#10 alma

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 08:05 AM

Hi :)

That happened to me too. I smoke for 11 years and I'm 30 years old. I was a heavy smoker but I just stopped and I don't even know why I stopped. I just don't feel like smoking anymore. I have smoked once since I stopped but the magic is gone hehehe I don't enjoy it anymore so I just don't do it. I also thought it was weird and that's why I googled it and found your question. I haven't smoke for 8 months now and I'm ok with it. My husband does smoke around me but I don't even crave it anymore. Sooo weird huh?

#11 Elmx844

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Posted 26 October 2014 - 07:52 AM

I hate to necro threads but I found this thread because I Googled "Sudden loss of nicotine addiction".
I too have suddenly lost my addiction. I don't know if this is the real reason but it was right after I got my cat that suddenly I just didn't feel like smoking anymore. I also have not had any withdrawal symptoms.
Perhaps there should be a law passed that every pack of cigarettes comes with a free cat! (Joking)
I still enjoy using my vape a few times a week because it's still good for relieving stress. And it's strange that I'm not getting re-addicted.
Has anyone else had this happen to them?
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#12 Beacon

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Posted 26 October 2014 - 12:43 PM

I think it is awesome if a person no longer feels like smoking.  This is a sign to quit immediately.  Throw everything out!  Start seeing yourself as a nonsmoker.  Tell all of your friends.  :)


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#13 Reisen

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Posted 26 October 2014 - 01:52 PM

I don't see why this shouldn't be possible. A friend of mine stopped around nine months ago, simply by waking up one day, noticing not having any cigarettes, and simply never getting a new pack.
Just like that. He simply forgot after that. Three days later he was at a party, was offered one, he said he just doesn't feel like smoking anymore.

Frankly, I had so little withdrawal symptoms, that I can almost count myself into that group. However, I was making sure that urges don't come up, and I actively disassociated smoking with places and routines. So I guess I'm not in that group after all.
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#14 ozm8ey

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 05:57 AM

depends I guess, apparently cannabis is just as addictive as tobbaco and I was smoking weed for about 5 years and quit without any withdraw symtoms (btw i quit because it was giving me psychosis) it all just depends how much you rely on smoking and what other habits you do while smoking.



#15 Reisen

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 06:38 AM

depends I guess, apparently cannabis is just as addictive as tobbaco and I was smoking weed for about 5 years and quit without any withdraw symtoms (btw i quit because it was giving me psychosis) it all just depends how much you rely on smoking and what other habits you do while smoking.

That's interesting, but even though we have millions and millions of Cannabis users, the physiological addiction of it, has never been proven yet[1].
The only way to get dependent on Cannabis are psychological and sociological. Hence you have a lot of 12 year olds being "treated" for Cannabis addiction, and almost none in the 40 - 50 age bracket.

Check out this chart:
gDeMtpB.jpg
As you can see, it's kinda the other way round with things like Alcohol.
That's the difference between physiological dependence and other dependence.
(The chart plots admissions of daily users to addiction clinics[2])

The main reason why teenagers end up in addiction clinics, is because it's simply detrimental to their performance in school at that age.
You can't expect a stoned 14 year old perform good in class. But a daily 30-something user, is probably old enough to know to only smoke Cannabis after hours.
 


[1]: http://en.wikipedia....abis_dependence
[2]: http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/18292704


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#16 Milla

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Posted 04 December 2014 - 09:40 PM

Hi!

 

Well, it did happen to me long ago, very long ago in my first quit. I just decided 'I'm done with this' and I was. No cravings, no withdrawal, no nothing. I had been smoking for 15 years maybe, over a pack daily by then.

 

Now, 24 days ago, I was very sick, somekind of a flu virus which threw me down to bed for 2 weeks... withdrawal started just after I decided to quit, on day 10 more or less... so —

 

(1) I quit smoking because I was sick (and totally unable to smoke)

(2) then I decided to quit (or stay quit) and

(3) only then the symptoms started.

 

:)


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#17 coconutbunz

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 02:14 AM

Faint lingering feeling.  I have the same feeling and I dont expect it will ever disappear.  It may become less frequent though.  I would say that it is your psychological connection to smoking.   The body may no longer be addicted to nicotine cos nicotine has left the body - but the mind is still addicted to the thought of smoking and these thoughts can turn into feelings, whether it be a conscious or subconscious thought in the form of another craving or not, well that is my interpretation of what you may be experiencing.  



#18 Samhain

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 04:45 PM

Hi all, new to board.  This topic's title caught my attention because of my grandfather and his amazing story.

He was a cab driver who smoked 3-4 packs a day of Pall Mall filterless.   My dad said he smoked constantly, lighting his next cigarette while putting his current one out, waking up several times through the night just to smoke, etc., and had zero intention or desire to ever quit.  One night he ran out of cigarettes early in his shift, and planned on swinging by the store to pick up more after his current customer.  However, he got extremely busy and was unable to stop for about 3 hours, which meant he was unable to smoke for that long.   When finally getting the chance, he pulled into the parking lot, looked at his watch, and said to himself  "I've gone 3 hours without a cigarette? Hell I don't need 'em anymore then."    And with that, he never touched another cigarette for the rest of his life.  


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#19 Nancy.

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 06:24 PM

Hi all, new to board.  This topic's title caught my attention because of my grandfather and his amazing story.

He was a cab driver who smoked 3-4 packs a day of Pall Mall filterless.   My dad said he smoked constantly, lighting his next cigarette while putting his current one out, waking up several times through the night just to smoke, etc., and had zero intention or desire to ever quit.  One night he ran out of cigarettes early in his shift, and planned on swinging by the store to pick up more after his current customer.  However, he got extremely busy and was unable to stop for about 3 hours, which meant he was unable to smoke for that long.   When finally getting the chance, he pulled into the parking lot, looked at his watch, and said to himself  "I've gone 3 hours without a cigarette? Hell I don't need 'em anymore then."    And with that, he never touched another cigarette for the rest of his life.  

Welcome to the board!  That is a wonderful and inspiring story.  Are you quitting, now?  If you will introduce yourself and tell us about your quit on the Main Board, there will be a lot of people anxious to greet you and learn more about you and your quit.


Nancy

 

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#20 Q Tip

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Posted 18 March 2015 - 04:56 PM

I had pains in my arm but also ran out of cigs one day. Pretty much that was it.

 

On day 2, everything looked like a cigarette. On day 3, I was very angry with myself - it was too easy for me and I should have quit way sooner.

 

I smoked for 30 years, then went CT and now I'm smoke free for 1 year and 1 month.

 

Everyday I think about the fact that I smoked everyday for 30 years, but I don't miss it and I never crave for a smoke.

 

Somewhere online there's a cartoon of a cigarette pack walking to a gravesite with an arm around a man's shoulder (like an old friend) and helping the man get into the earth. That woke me up.


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