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What if I stop the gum today?


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#1 Margot62

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 04:30 PM

After going to whyquit.com (great website!) I decided to stop chewing the nicotine gum. I realized I was just prolonging the withdrawl and I just want to get it over with!

Does this mean that I have to start the REAL withdrawl now and that everything I have been going through for the past four days doesn't count? I don't get it.

It's been two hours since my last piece of gum and I can tell the withdrawl is bad already without the gum. This makes me feel as if all the progress I've made for the past four days was all an illusion.l The gum was just making it seem easier than it was.

Now that I don't have the gum, do I have hell to look forward to again for the next four days? How does this all work????

Margot

#2 Michigan Sandy

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 04:37 PM

I'm not a medical expert, but have lots of experience in quitting!

Yes, how you'll be going through nicotine withdrawal... probably not as bad as if you didn't have 4 days of lesser nicotine under your belt.

And hooray... you have 4 days of habit broken too! Don't forget that.

I'm thinking you'll definitely feel withdrawals, but not as bad as you think!

Hang with it! Just get'er done!
There is NO reason good enough to light up; not even running into old boyfriends.

#3 Anju

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 04:37 PM

Margot,

I commend you for preparing and reading for your quit, and the self realizations you are facing.

If you quit the gum today, yes it is possible that you are going to be uncomfortable for a few days. With each day, it will get easier. Please believe me.

However, the thought that comes to mind is ask yourself if you would rather be uncomfortable for a few days becoming nicotiene free, or being uncomfortable being a slave to nicotiene for the rest of your life?

We're here for you. Post before you go and do something you'll regret later. Drink lots of fluids to flush out the toxins quicker. Keep reading whyquit, and keep yourself busy with a positive attitude(it helps).

You can do this! The past four days haven't been for naught! You have already given your lungs a rest and a chance to heal. Stay with us Margot, it will get easier! ~Anju
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#4 drseuss

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 04:44 PM

My take on the gum (which I used early on for about 10 days) was that it was a toold to help me change the physical habits/routines associated with smoking. The gum "allowed" me to stay inside the house after a meal and sit with my family and talk instead of needing to step outside for a smoke. The gum kept me in my office more instead of making the trek to the parking garage. The gum *forced* me to change my physical routine and it did so *before* I had to face the chemical dependency of the nicotine.

I actually got a prescription for Chantix (non NRT) because I was concerned about stopping the gum (even though I wasn't chewing the gum much anyway). After about 3 days on Chantix, I switched my gum to Trident.

So...this is how I did it and it worked. Never forget that YOU CAN DO THIS. You HAVE quit.

I hate to sound like a drug add, but if you're concerned about the gum and withdrawls, go see your doctor and see about a prescription for Chantix.

KTQ no matter what!

8)
“Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind.” ~~ Theodor Seuss Geisel (1904 - 1991)

Quit Date 12/31/2006
Nicotine Free Since 1/30/2007

#5 Jeff

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 04:53 PM

Margot62 if it was easy to quit everyone would quit.
The deal is this, only a certain number of people will end up with a "sticky" quit because they wanted to so bad they dealt with the cravings.

After time goes by you will be able to deal with this in your head and not in your physical sense. Cravings will not kill you but smoking will.
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#6 Margot62

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 04:53 PM

I don't know how anyone in the world has quit without all of you!!

Thanks for your replies. I found this information on whyquit.com regarding the nicotine gum:

Use of the gum may reduce the initial severity of withdrawal when quitting. The ex-smoker may continue chewing the gum for months, never reaching peak withdrawal. But because blood nicotine never reaches the levels maintained by cigarettes, nor totally leaves the body, he feels minor withdrawal symptoms on a chronic basis. When he finally quits using the gum, he will probably experience the same withdrawal he would have originally encountered when quitting cigarettes.



So, I'm tossing the gum today. I'd rather just get the withdrawl over with once and for all. If I had just done this in the first place, I would have been feeling so much better by now! Instead, I have three MORE days of REAL withdrawl to look forward to.

I know it probably helped (the gum) in the long run. I got to "practice" a little bit and totally abstain from smoking for the first time in my life. So, I won't cry over spilled milk, but yuck. I'm not looking forward to the next 72 hours completely nicotine free.

Expect to see me around here....a lot!!!

Thanks so much for all your help.

Margot

#7 Mimi

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 04:58 PM

Margot, you are a winner for sure!
LIFE is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty & well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, totally worn out & proclaiming: "WOW, what a RIDE!"

#8 Anju

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 05:00 PM

So, I'm tossing the gum today. I'd rather just get the withdrawl over with once and for all. If I had just done this in the first place, I would have been feeling so much better by now! Instead, I have three MORE days of REAL withdrawl to look forward to.


Heck, I see it as the rest of your life being free to look forward to! Thats exciting stuff! ~Anju
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#9 bonnie

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 05:07 PM

Hi Margot,
I used the nicotrol inhaler for 30 days. I was not ready to quit smoking ...just knew that I had to quit. I had the inhaler here for months and kept saying "as soon as this pack of cigarettes is gone, I will start the inhaler". Finally the day came and I started. The first 3 days were tough but then I became dependent on the nicotine I was getting from the inhaler. I was changing my habits and dependence on the cigarettes.
When I went off the inhaler, I went thru withdrawal again for 3 days but I don't think it was as bad as just quitting. I, too, felt like I had wasted 30 days but then I had to say that if I hadn't started with the inhaler, I may still be smoking.
I have not smoked cigarettes since Dec. 16, 2006 and I have been nicotine free since Jan. 17, 2007. I have two anniversaries.
I think it is important to quit ...not how you get there. After months of being nicotine free those few days won't make a difference.
You will be so happy to be free in 3 days!!
Bonnie

#10 Jeff

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 05:34 PM

Margot62 we are a team.
We are a family seeking one goal.

And I am seeing a scraper in you.

I see a fighter that is starting to get fired up
about breaking free and walking away from the chains..BIG CHAINS.

BUT we break chain links here that's our job !
This place is a one big bust out so lets roll..

Margot62 you are brave soul :D
QUIT SMOKING AUDIO DOWNLOADS
(Thanks to Skip & Joel) http://www.whyquit.com/joel/#video

DEC 4 2006 = My freedom

#11 mary

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 06:37 PM

Don't look back, Margot62...just look forward. I agree with Anju...your lungs have gotten a break and have already started to heal. No matter how we quit...we've got to go through some physical and emotional withdrawals. You've got a great quit going. Stay positive and try not to focus too much on the withdrawal. You can do this. Just keep posting and remember we've all been there. NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF mary

#12 Margot62

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 06:40 PM

Just wasn't ready for the total onslaught. Popped a piece of gum in my mouth...will try to take it easy on the gum for the rest of the day, but wasn't prepared for the fallout. If I only have one or two pieces of gum a day, I can't help but believe that I won't experience the brunt of withdrawl.

The problem just stopping the gum on a dime was this: I never came so close in the past four days to actually having a cigarette. Seriously, I almost drove to the store and bought a pack. This is the closest I've come to smoking since I puffed last. I think Nicotine replacement has its mertits after all. It helps you get used to not smoking for awhile.... I'd rather be on the gum than smoking actual cigarettes! At least for now.

#13 mary

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 06:47 PM

I totally agree. And we'd much rather see you using a NRT than a cancer ridden cigarette. I used the patch in the beginning and have no doubt it helped me. You'll know when it's time to slow down on the gum and finally give it up. In the meantime...like I said...you're lungs and throat and heart are getting some much needed clean air. you're still doing fine. Hang in there. KTQ mary

#14 Mimi

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 06:54 PM

My belief is that you should use whatever is available to quit...or quit "cold turkey". Quitting smoking should be the primary focus. Once that is done then you can take on additional worries or concerns. Also, talk to your doctor about quitting. There are so many non-nicotine options "out there" for you to use to make it easier on your brain and on your nerves.

I gotta say, I truly admire those who quit cold turkey. I'm not saying that I don't think I could have done it that way...what I am saying is that I chose not to do it that way.
LIFE is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty & well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, totally worn out & proclaiming: "WOW, what a RIDE!"

#15 Margot62

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 07:12 PM

You made me feel better!

This is so hard, isn't it? It makes me realize how pervasive and dasterdly smoking really is I'm even angry right now at the whole situation, getting lured in as a young teenager through peer pressure and staying hooked through my entire young adult and adult life.

I just allowed myself a good cry. Wish I could claim I was the wanton warrior, doing battle with a sword, but instead, it's just me, Margot, a human being, wiping tears of frustration from my eyes and occassionally feeling sorry for myself. This really bites. It reminds me of someone who loves an abusive spouse and is trying to wean themselves off of 30 years of marriage.

You know what? In the past year, I lost my best friend to breast cancer (she was 49), I lost my father to a stroke eight weeks later (he was 64), and I lost my best friend from high school a few weeks later when she had a heart attack (she was 42). A month after that, my husband's best friend died of kidney cancer (he was 49) and five months later, my daughter's boyfriend died in a car accident two days before Christmas. And, I know you won't believe this, but today we are all going to the wake of a young and wonderful girl (21 years old) who died in a fire on her college campus. She was my daughter's good friend. Six deaths in 12 months--all young and wonderful people. I have had the year from HELL. I can't help but think this is NOT the time to quit. But I had to. In the midst of all this craziness, I've had bronchitis five times. My body was begging me to stop smoking. Lousy timing. I needed another year to grieve before I tried to give up the butts. But as fate would have it, I was literally dying from smoking---a slow and prolonged death, but still, a steadied one.


So, when I say that I am sitting here crying, I'm not kidding. To have lost so many people who meant the world to me in such a short time, and then to have to give up cigarettes---the very thing that seemed to keep me somewhat sane all these awful months---well, it feels like another loss to me, one more thing I have to live without.

Silly, I know, since smoking probably would have killed me in the long run, too, but it WAS a coping mechanism, albeit a stupid one.

I just want to give myself every chance to succeed, even if it means chewing the gum for a bit. After this year, it would be very easy for me to rationalize picking up a cigarette again, but I'm determined....

Thanks for listening.

#16 bonnie

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 07:23 PM

Hi Margot,
I lost my father and best friend to cancer..smoking related.
It didn't make me quit. It made me feel guilty for smoking.
I know about the crying and thinking I was losing a friend..
Go to http://www.whyquit.com. and read the Cigarette My Friend.
You will look at this differently.
I still have days I feel like crying. I get over it. Just treat yourself nice and do this for you..
Bonnie

#17 Jeff

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 07:41 PM

Margot you will survive now. Do you know why?
I think you already know how so the why part might be not as important.

One thing I see and "feel" reading your last message was right to my heart.

Many people here have seen or felt what you have just posted.

I have an idea though Margot!
Every day that I am a free man from this addiction I look up and smile at my Father and Brother and friends that have died of cancer.

I smile because I KNOW they are so happy for me and US that we are going to try and live out our lives free of smoking.

I smoked WITH my brother as he lived in hospice. We would put him in a wheel chair and go out and smoke. I never even thought about quiting then. But I know he is real happy to see his younger brother not smoking.

I know this is the same with your family and friends too.
They see you and say "YES" she is ready to be free !!
They ARE celebrating with you dancing with you on your journey.
QUIT SMOKING AUDIO DOWNLOADS
(Thanks to Skip & Joel) http://www.whyquit.com/joel/#video

DEC 4 2006 = My freedom

#18 Mimi

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 11:28 PM

Margot said:

So, when I say that I am sitting here crying, I'm not kidding. To have lost so many people who meant the world to me in such a short time, and then to have to give up cigarettes---the very thing that seemed to keep me somewhat sane all these awful months---well, it feels like another loss to me, one more thing I have to live without.


Margot, try to look at it this way: You lost so many wonderful, young people in such a short time that stopping your addiction is LIFE AFFIRMING. You are telling the world that you treasure life. That all life is worth the effort and pain of a quit. I just bet that if you asked each of the deceased, regardless of how they died, if they would go through nicotine withdrawal to live a full life there would be a resounding YES!

Dedicate YOUR QUIT TO THEM. Make your quit become something larger than yourself. Cry, if you must. It cleanses the body and soul. Did you know that tears contain chemicals that are negative to our bodies? Tears can be very useful and productive.
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LIFE is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty & well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, totally worn out & proclaiming: "WOW, what a RIDE!"




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