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Nicotine Spray thingies - do they work?

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#1 Reisen

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 03:04 AM

Do you guys or someone yon know ever used Nicotine inhalators?

nicorettemist.jpg

I've seen them sitting on a shelf in a pharmacy the other day.
It seems it's a pretty novel way of attempting a quit or to "cut down".

At 23 to 35 Euros per bottle, they're pretty expensive.

What it is
One of these bottles contains ~150 doses. With a max safe dose of 64 per day and max. 4 per hour. Supposedly you'd use those 64 doses each day, a bottle would last you around two and one third days, which is pretty much three bottles per week.

Given the current price point that would equate 10 to 15 Euros per day.

A dose is supposed to administer around the same dose you'd get from a cigarette, so for all intents and purposes, one dose = one cigarette. You're allowed to take two doses at once every once in a while, but never exceed 4 doses per hour, and these 64 doses every 24 hours.

However, the dose is set to 1mg/dose, which is more than most regular strength cigarettes (the strongest filter cigarettes, have 0.9mg/cig here).
 
How much it costs
A dose costs between 0.375 to 0.54 Euro cents. A cigarette costs between 0.26 to 0.32 Euro cents - so about twice as much as for a regular cigarette. Given NRTs are always on the expensive side, I'd say this is pretty much what you'd expect.

So if you'd constantly use that bottle to the max, you'd pay anywhere from 9.5 to ~15 Euros per day.
However 64 doses would mean anywhere around 64 cigarettes per day, so a fairly heavy smoker.

The package suggest using the product for 12 weeks. Meaning instantly switching from cigarettes to that spray (so unlike Chantix, where you're supposed to smoke for the first week or so).
Personally, I think twelve weeks a little long for a cessation program, but let's do the math real quick.

Technicalities
So the program is 84 days long, (12 weeks) and lets assume you max out the 64 doses on your first day. As the packaging says, one bottle delivers 150 doses.
On day 84, you're supposed to wane yourself off of nicotine so much, that it's the last day of nicotine intake, and from day 85 onward, you're not supposed to take the spray anymore.

The actual doses per day can be computed using the following function:

doses.png

It's adjusted, so the dose is 64 on day 0, and 0 on day 85. The function follows inverse exponential depletion, which follows the same sort of depletion curve, nicotine has inside the human body.

cumulative_doses.png

At the end of your program, you're supposed to have taken 1139 doses, and your 8th bottle is 40% full at that point.

Eight bottles will cost between 192 Euros and 280 Euros, depending if you can get a special deal, and where you get them (what pharmacy that is, they're not sold in drug stores). That is pretty expensive...
However assuming you never stopped, and smoke one pack a day, that would be 84 * 5.2 = 462 Euros. So even though it's kinda expensive, it's still less expensive than smoking through the whole time.

Conclusion
I understand the product, especially from a convenience stand point. I can see how it simulates the "hit" of a cigarette, and it kinda disguises itself as a mouth freshener, so it wins on the inconspicuousness level.

I find it kinda expensive, though. Also, I think the cessation program is very long. I think with just a tiny bit of self discipline, I'd say you could do it in half the time.

I think the dose is too high. 1mg/dose is more than a regular cigarette, and I think that doesn't make sense.
Since the nicotine addiction is taken on ever so slowly, I could see how people go right back to smoking cigarettes, when you run out of that spray or lose your bottle, and you can't get a new one right away.

I'd love to know, if and how these sprays are helpful. The packaging and websites are full of marketing blather, saying things like it'll "triple your chances to smoke", without saying whether if it's the first try, or a consecutive quit attempt. If one dose contains 1mg of nicotine, that would be like smoking a whole regular strength cigarette in one single draw! I can't imagine that's pleasant.

Also, I can see how the minty taste and smell, and things like the novelty of it might make people just use the spray instead of cigs, without actually quitting. Kinda like the ever so famous "vapers".

I must say I'm quite skeptical of it. Then again, I guess it's not much different from nicotine gum.

Appendix
Code used: (license: ISC)

#!/usr/bin/env lua

function round(num, idp)
  local mul = 10^(idp or 0)
  return math.floor(num * mul + 0.5) / mul
end

local c=0

for d=0,85 do
  local s = round(64 * math.exp(-d/17.4))
  c = c + s
  --b = math.ceil(c / 64)
  b = c / 150
  print("day: " .. d .. " ; doses: " .. s .. " ; cumulative doses: " .. c .. " bottle: " .. round(b, 2))
end

Data: (when the bottle number says "4.21" for instance, that means you used 21% of bottle 5)

day: 0 ; doses: 64 ; cumulative doses: 64 bottle: 0.43
day: 1 ; doses: 60 ; cumulative doses: 124 bottle: 0.83
day: 2 ; doses: 57 ; cumulative doses: 181 bottle: 1.21
day: 3 ; doses: 54 ; cumulative doses: 235 bottle: 1.57
day: 4 ; doses: 51 ; cumulative doses: 286 bottle: 1.91
day: 5 ; doses: 48 ; cumulative doses: 334 bottle: 2.23
day: 6 ; doses: 45 ; cumulative doses: 379 bottle: 2.53
day: 7 ; doses: 43 ; cumulative doses: 422 bottle: 2.81
day: 8 ; doses: 40 ; cumulative doses: 462 bottle: 3.08
day: 9 ; doses: 38 ; cumulative doses: 500 bottle: 3.33
day: 10 ; doses: 36 ; cumulative doses: 536 bottle: 3.57
day: 11 ; doses: 34 ; cumulative doses: 570 bottle: 3.8
day: 12 ; doses: 32 ; cumulative doses: 602 bottle: 4.01
day: 13 ; doses: 30 ; cumulative doses: 632 bottle: 4.21
day: 14 ; doses: 29 ; cumulative doses: 661 bottle: 4.41
day: 15 ; doses: 27 ; cumulative doses: 688 bottle: 4.59
day: 16 ; doses: 26 ; cumulative doses: 714 bottle: 4.76
day: 17 ; doses: 24 ; cumulative doses: 738 bottle: 4.92
day: 18 ; doses: 23 ; cumulative doses: 761 bottle: 5.07
day: 19 ; doses: 21 ; cumulative doses: 782 bottle: 5.21
day: 20 ; doses: 20 ; cumulative doses: 802 bottle: 5.35
day: 21 ; doses: 19 ; cumulative doses: 821 bottle: 5.47
day: 22 ; doses: 18 ; cumulative doses: 839 bottle: 5.59
day: 23 ; doses: 17 ; cumulative doses: 856 bottle: 5.71
day: 24 ; doses: 16 ; cumulative doses: 872 bottle: 5.81
day: 25 ; doses: 15 ; cumulative doses: 887 bottle: 5.91
day: 26 ; doses: 14 ; cumulative doses: 901 bottle: 6.01
day: 27 ; doses: 14 ; cumulative doses: 915 bottle: 6.1
day: 28 ; doses: 13 ; cumulative doses: 928 bottle: 6.19
day: 29 ; doses: 12 ; cumulative doses: 940 bottle: 6.27
day: 30 ; doses: 11 ; cumulative doses: 951 bottle: 6.34
day: 31 ; doses: 11 ; cumulative doses: 962 bottle: 6.41
day: 32 ; doses: 10 ; cumulative doses: 972 bottle: 6.48
day: 33 ; doses: 10 ; cumulative doses: 982 bottle: 6.55
day: 34 ; doses: 9 ; cumulative doses: 991 bottle: 6.61
day: 35 ; doses: 9 ; cumulative doses: 1000 bottle: 6.67
day: 36 ; doses: 8 ; cumulative doses: 1008 bottle: 6.72
day: 37 ; doses: 8 ; cumulative doses: 1016 bottle: 6.77
day: 38 ; doses: 7 ; cumulative doses: 1023 bottle: 6.82
day: 39 ; doses: 7 ; cumulative doses: 1030 bottle: 6.87
day: 40 ; doses: 6 ; cumulative doses: 1036 bottle: 6.91
day: 41 ; doses: 6 ; cumulative doses: 1042 bottle: 6.95
day: 42 ; doses: 6 ; cumulative doses: 1048 bottle: 6.99
day: 43 ; doses: 5 ; cumulative doses: 1053 bottle: 7.02
day: 44 ; doses: 5 ; cumulative doses: 1058 bottle: 7.05
day: 45 ; doses: 5 ; cumulative doses: 1063 bottle: 7.09
day: 46 ; doses: 5 ; cumulative doses: 1068 bottle: 7.12
day: 47 ; doses: 4 ; cumulative doses: 1072 bottle: 7.15
day: 48 ; doses: 4 ; cumulative doses: 1076 bottle: 7.17
day: 49 ; doses: 4 ; cumulative doses: 1080 bottle: 7.2
day: 50 ; doses: 4 ; cumulative doses: 1084 bottle: 7.23
day: 51 ; doses: 3 ; cumulative doses: 1087 bottle: 7.25
day: 52 ; doses: 3 ; cumulative doses: 1090 bottle: 7.27
day: 53 ; doses: 3 ; cumulative doses: 1093 bottle: 7.29
day: 54 ; doses: 3 ; cumulative doses: 1096 bottle: 7.31
day: 55 ; doses: 3 ; cumulative doses: 1099 bottle: 7.33
day: 56 ; doses: 3 ; cumulative doses: 1102 bottle: 7.35
day: 57 ; doses: 2 ; cumulative doses: 1104 bottle: 7.36
day: 58 ; doses: 2 ; cumulative doses: 1106 bottle: 7.37
day: 59 ; doses: 2 ; cumulative doses: 1108 bottle: 7.39
day: 60 ; doses: 2 ; cumulative doses: 1110 bottle: 7.4
day: 61 ; doses: 2 ; cumulative doses: 1112 bottle: 7.41
day: 62 ; doses: 2 ; cumulative doses: 1114 bottle: 7.43
day: 63 ; doses: 2 ; cumulative doses: 1116 bottle: 7.44
day: 64 ; doses: 2 ; cumulative doses: 1118 bottle: 7.45
day: 65 ; doses: 2 ; cumulative doses: 1120 bottle: 7.47
day: 66 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1121 bottle: 7.47
day: 67 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1122 bottle: 7.48
day: 68 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1123 bottle: 7.49
day: 69 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1124 bottle: 7.49
day: 70 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1125 bottle: 7.5
day: 71 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1126 bottle: 7.51
day: 72 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1127 bottle: 7.51
day: 73 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1128 bottle: 7.52
day: 74 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1129 bottle: 7.53
day: 75 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1130 bottle: 7.53
day: 76 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1131 bottle: 7.54
day: 77 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1132 bottle: 7.55
day: 78 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1133 bottle: 7.55
day: 79 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1134 bottle: 7.56
day: 80 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1135 bottle: 7.57
day: 81 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1136 bottle: 7.57
day: 82 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1137 bottle: 7.58
day: 83 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1138 bottle: 7.59
day: 84 ; doses: 1 ; cumulative doses: 1139 bottle: 7.59
day: 85 ; doses: 0 ; cumulative doses: 1139 bottle: 7.59

Fun fact: while in the first half (six weeks) you'll go through seven bottles, you'd go only through slightly more than half of one bottle in the second six weeks (second half).


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#2 MissyCat

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 03:52 AM

Reisen! I love it when you do what you do best! I actually read it all but the qoted stats....
Carol
A 2014 Avenger
Smoke free since October 21, 2014

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#3 Lucy1

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 04:20 AM

Reisen,

 

Let me guess -- you quit cold turkey.  Do you derive satisfaction in discouraging people from using NRT?  I've observed a lot of this over the years and I've never understood it.  Why does it matter to you how someone else manages to kick nicotine addiction?

 

>>Personally, I think twelve weeks a little long for a cessation program, but let's do the math real quick.<<  

 

Personally you think 12 weeks is too long ... ahem ... I don't want to be rude, but I have to ask, so what?  What does it matter what *you* personally think about this?  Do you think your personal opinion should influence someone else whose personality, DNA, experiences, environment, etc are entirely different from yours?!?

 

Those Nicotine Replacement "thingies" are lifesavers for some of us.  It offends me that you make fun of the idea.  thingies. 

 

Lucy

 

Lucy


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#4 Reisen

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 05:26 AM

Reisen,
 
Let me guess -- you quit cold turkey.  Do you derive satisfaction in discouraging people from using NRT?

I did quit cold turkey, yes. I don't see how my post is discouraging. Also, stating I "derive satisfaction" from that, is pretty insulting.
 

I've observed a lot of this over the years and I've never understood it.  Why does it matter to you how someone else manages to kick nicotine addiction?

I find it sad, that you don't understand it. It doesn't matter to me, in fact I don't care one bit. Never once I've made assumptions about a factual quitter. But I like to take a look at things from all angles and take the claims it makes apart.
 

>>Personally, I think twelve weeks a little long for a cessation program, but let's do the math real quick.<<  
 
Personally you think 12 weeks is too long ... ahem ... I don't want to be rude, but I have to ask, so what?  What does it matter what *you* personally think about this?  Do you think your personal opinion should influence someone else whose personality, DNA, experiences, environment, etc are entirely different from yours?!?

No, hence I clearly said "Personally, I think...". It's just my opinion, but I didn't derive any sort of rule-set from it. An opinion is just that, an opinion. And I didn't use it for anything else than the statement itself. Never once I maid a claim what users of them should or should not do, based on that opinion. Please understand the difference between opinion, argument, and fact.
 

Those Nicotine Replacement "thingies" are lifesavers for some of us.  It offends me that you make fun of the idea.  thingies.

I'm sorry a differentiated look on a rather obvious matter offends you. On the other hand though, I must say that I don't understand why you accuse me of making fun of them or even why it matters to me how "someone else" quit their addiction. All I did, was looking at the data. Never once I made fun of the idea.

I'm not interested in any kind of throwing accusations back and forth. The only thing I am interested in, is having conversations and discussing different views, possibly. I wasn't personal in my posts, and I'd like you not to be personal in yours. I don't see the point in pointing fingers and "flaming" people.

 

If you're not interested in a discussion, please just leave the thread alone.


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#5 happycat

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 06:41 AM

Reissen, interesting work but I have some thoughts....

 

 

A dose is supposed to administer around the same dose you'd get from a cigarette, so for all intents and purposes, one dose = one cigarette. You're allowed to take two doses at once every once in a while, but never exceed 4 doses per hour, and these 64 doses every 24 hours.


However, the dose is set to 1mg/dose, which is more than most regular strength cigarettes (the strongest filter cigarettes, have 0.9mg/cig here).

 

 

I think the dose is too high. 1mg/dose is more than a regular cigarette, and I think that doesn't make sense.

 

 

I think the reason it doesn’t make sense is that your assumption that the rates of absorption are the same and that nicotine plasma concentrations will be equal even though the route of administration is different is probably faulty,

 

Though they are often called inhalers, the sprays are not meant to be inhaled. They’re meant to be sprayed inside the mouth without inhaling. The dose is meant to be absorbed into the blood stream from the oral mucosa. Absorption will be slower than inhaling a cigarette but a little faster than chewing gum or sucking on a lozenge. The latter forms commonly come in 2 and 4mg doses which immediately makes me think that comparing the effectiveness of any of these NRT products takes more than comparing their nicotine content to that of a cigarette. Something else is going on there. A good deal of the spray/gum/lozenge nicotine dose may be lost to swallowing. Its nicotine may be inactivated on ingestion. If there was a pill that could be given to maintain plasma nicotine levels, it probably would be the first and only route of NRT administration considered.

 

 

If one dose contains 1mg of nicotine, that would be like smoking a whole regular strength cigarette in one single draw! I can't imagine that's pleasant.

 

 

I think a faulty assumption exists here as well. The full effect is not felt immediately but per the info I was able to find, maximum effect of a 2 mg dose  takes about 13 minutes. That’s a little longer than it took most of us to smoke a cigarette. I found that info here from the drug manufacturer

 

http://www.medicines.org.uk/emc/medicine/24257

 

Whether the average smoker will indeed use 64 doses a day will likely depend on what the typical  steady state plasma concentration of nicotine can be expected in a typical smoker. I don’t have that info but think it will vary by smoker, dependent on both how many cigarettes they smoke and how they smoke them.

 

For what it’s worth, I think some people may find these sprays helpful but as with any method used to quit smoking, cold turkey included, good support and a good working plan for behavior mod will improve the outcome.

 

And that concludes my 2 cent contribution to this discussion :)


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#6 Reisen

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 07:51 AM

Reissen, interesting work but I have some thoughts....

I think the reason it doesn’t make sense is that your assumption that the rates of absorption are the same and that nicotine plasma concentrations will be equal even though the route of administration is different is probably faulty,

Though they are often called inhalers, the sprays are not meant to be inhaled. They’re meant to be sprayed inside the mouth without inhaling. The dose is meant to be absorbed into the blood stream from the oral mucosa. Absorption will be slower than inhaling a cigarette but a little faster than chewing gum or sucking on a lozenge. The latter forms commonly come in 2 and 4mg doses which immediately makes me think that comparing the effectiveness of any of these NRT products takes more than comparing their nicotine content to that of a cigarette. Something else is going on there. A good deal of the spray/gum/lozenge nicotine dose may be lost to swallowing. Its nicotine may be inactivated on ingestion. If there was a pill that could be given to maintain plasma nicotine levels, it probably would be the first and only route of NRT administration considered.

OK, then the dosage does make sense. The instruction leaflet clearly states not to use two doses at once, though. So a 2mg dose equals a regular/strong cigarette?

I think a faulty assumption exists here as well. The full effect is not felt immediately but per the info I was able to find, maximum effect of a 2 mg dose  takes about 13 minutes. That’s a little longer than it took most of us to smoke a cigarette. I found that info here from the drug manufacturer

http://www.medicines.../medicine/24257

Whether the average smoker will indeed use 64 doses a day will likely depend on what the typical steady state plasma concentration of nicotine can be expected in a typical smoker. I don’t have that info but think it will vary by smoker, dependent on both how many cigarettes they smoke and how they smoke them.

Still, the instructions say 64 doses should not be exceeded per day. I must therefore take it, it's the maximum dose that is safe for the users. But I can see how the absorption rates of the mucous membranes inside the mouth will vary from person to person. On the other hand, I believe they will be somewhat similar across people.

For what it’s worth, I think some people may find these sprays helpful but as with any method used to quit smoking, cold turkey included, good support and a good working plan for behavior mod will improve the outcome.

The instructions have only a few vague suggestions how to use the spray. They basically just tell the max amount of doses per day and hours and otherwise instruct the user to use the spray "whenever the urge to smoke comes up". I'd like to hear from someone that has been using it, is using it how it works.

But I guess we can all see, that it's pretty much a similar NRT to gum and lozenges.

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#7 happycat

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 08:17 AM

 

 

OK, then the dosage does make sense. The instruction leaflet clearly states not to use two doses at once, though. So a 2mg dose equals a regular/strong cigarette?

 

I'm not sure how it compares because I don't know how much nicotine would typically end up in the bloodstream at "peak" time after smoking. If the minimum dose is 1 spray then some people could be expected to find relief with that. Frequency of spray based on need probably varies by person as well, dependent on their smoking history. There are half pack a day smokers and 2 pack a day smokers. It's not likely to be a one size fits all thing. The instructions base dose on relief of cravings. I'd expect heavy smokers would require more sprays more frequently and lighter smokers fewer sprays at longer intervals. But these are just my assumptions. I also think it would be good to hear from someone that has actually used this product. :)


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#8 holyhell

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 11:41 AM

Always enjoy reading your studies Reisen.  Thank you for sharing them here.  The more info and differing perspectives we embrace, the better the decisions we make.

 

 

 

A friend of mine at work is using the spray and the gum for the past year.  He keeps slipping back to smoking.

 

Not that it is only his choice of aids to quit that makes a weak quit, as there are many more factors such as his wife smokes and he quit due to health forcing him to quit.

 

But there is something to be said for breaking the nicotine hold early in a quit.  I see it as a door closing so that the windows of opportunity open.  But that is just me.


          1cf13b0e13.png      th_imagejpg11_zps41a23c3b.jpg

 

Only one puff away from a pack a day

Saying yes to one invites the thousands hiding behind that one

A successful quit is a life-preserver through the trials of life

A crave passes whether you smoke or not

I stopped the damage at 5:27 pm Thursday, January 23, 2014


#9 daveinermo

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 01:27 AM

The best way to quit...is the way that works for you.

 

Intersting facts and figures.

 

If someone needs this tool and it helps people to quit then I say why not. Some people find cold turkey too hard, some people like gum, some people find chantix is their bag.

 

If it's a tool that can help someone stop pumping over 3000 chemicals into their body I am for it.


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#10 hermine

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 08:53 AM

I understand the product, especially from a convenience stand point. I can see how it simulates the "hit" of a cigarette, and it kinda disguises itself as a mouth freshener, so it wins on the inconspicuousness level.

I find it kinda expensive, though. Also, I think the cessation program is very long. I think with just a tiny bit of self discipline, I'd say you could do it in half the time.

I think the dose is too high. 1mg/dose is more than a regular cigarette, and I think that doesn't make sense.
Since the nicotine addiction is taken on ever so slowly, I could see how people go right back to smoking cigarettes, when you run out of that spray or lose your bottle, and you can't get a new one right away.

 

I have never heard of this product before. I agree with your conclusion.


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#11 Reisen

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 11:36 AM

The best way to quit...is the way that works for you.
 
Intersting facts and figures.
 
If someone needs this tool and it helps people to quit then I say why not. Some people find cold turkey too hard, some people like gum, some people find chantix is their bag.
 
If it's a tool that can help someone stop pumping over 3000 chemicals into their body I am for it.

That goes without saying. I just think it's interesting to look a bit deeper into these things.

Also, I think it makes sense to have a unbiased and professional understanding of how this works. After all, one of the key aspects of a quit, is understanding how the addiction works, too. I think it makes sense to have a compendium of the different ways of quitting and aids to quit, especially for new users.
 

A friend of mine at work is using the spray and the gum for the past year.  He keeps slipping back to smoking.

Not that it is only his choice of aids to quit that makes a weak quit, as there are many more factors such as his wife smokes and he quit due to health forcing him to quit.

Is he using the spray and gum as a quick fix in case he can't smoke (for instance on a plane, etc.), and he doesn't really want to quit, or is he actually wanting to quit? Is his health permanently impaired, or was it just something temporary (like an operation that required him to stop for a few weeks)?


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#12 holyhell

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 11:45 AM

No, not for travel or other instances.  He is feeding spray and gum to the addiction calls (in place of a cigarette).  He doesn't believe it is possible he can quit so he keeps his body addicted to nicotine and regularly slipping back to smoking.  He has to quit.  Heart. 


          1cf13b0e13.png      th_imagejpg11_zps41a23c3b.jpg

 

Only one puff away from a pack a day

Saying yes to one invites the thousands hiding behind that one

A successful quit is a life-preserver through the trials of life

A crave passes whether you smoke or not

I stopped the damage at 5:27 pm Thursday, January 23, 2014


#13 Paulin123

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 08:24 PM

What ever helps anybody quit smoking is good enough wether it be gum
E cigarettes patches or prescribed medication it doesn't matter
Some people can't do cold turkey ( I couldn't )
But I'm now nicotine free and am very proud
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#14 Paulin123

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 08:30 PM

Ps
Surely all these aids have to be better than smoking don't you think !
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#15 Frank

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 09:05 PM

I'll keep my frozen turkey. What is described seems way too much work for me.


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Nov 6, 2011 I decided " I had enough with this sh*t "

I quit because I just got tired of the life under a rock, dark and with not enough air to breathe waiting for the day to get crushed!

Alcohol to a quit is like Kryptonite to Superman

Stop, Think and then React. Not React,Stop and then Think

Practice does not make it perfect, makes it permanent. Practice the right things!

Quitting is by far the best decision for the rest of your life.

If a Doctor gives you 6 months to live, would you start living after the first three? Quit now!

" I am a puff away form a pack a day"

Once you stop puffing or having Nicotine in any form, then and only then your symptoms will stop.

I quit with a frozen turkey. Once I felt comfortable with my quit,  I ate it.

Life is such a good teacher, that if you don't learn the lesson it will repeat it to you.

 

 

 


#16 4Vaska

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Posted 16 June 2016 - 12:59 AM

I used this to quit. I agree 1mg per squirt is a bit high, I tend to use half a squirt (i.e. don't press the button all the way).

Have been NRT free for 10 days and I say it works for me. Otherwise the withdrawal really freaks out my blood chemistry (to the point where I have to be hospitalised) like when I did Cold Turkeys.

Do what works for you. Frozen Birds, Gum, Chakra Yoga stuff, etc. Everyone is different. Some can taper off safely and get a sticky quit, some just use this as a "sprayable cigarette". :)

Good Luck, whatever your method :D


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#17 Puggie

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Posted 16 June 2016 - 11:21 AM

I would recommend a combination of patches and nasal spray, works very well for me. Step down on the patches gradually and use the nasal spray for up to 12 months to sustain abstinence from smoking. Please see attachment for more info.http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/9924052

 

Regarding my quit. I was a 1-1.5 pack a day smoker. The patches do really work, however, they do not provide the instant nicotine peak that is delivered during smoking. The nasal spray does this, however, making quit attempts more successful long-term (ie. beyond a few weeks).



#18 roham

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 05:21 PM

I bought one when I were in Australia...it was great and I managed not to smoke for 2 weeks staying in AU with nicotine spray.

I think they are better than gums and patchs 


I am sorry, since my mother language is  not english, what I write may be wrong 

thank you very much 

 

 

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#19 4Vaska

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Posted 01 December 2016 - 05:21 AM

Back to give an update, 6.5 months in and I'm still quit.

NRT spray gets my thumbs up for helping getting a sticky quit. Used it for 2.5 weeks after quitting smoking, and the 3rd week I kept "forgetting" to use it... and the nicotine hold on me is banished forever :D

Different methods with the same ending: permanent quit, be it frozen birds, catfood, NRT spray, patches, chantix, hypnosis.... do what works for you!

P/s: having catfood to munch on also helps, re: quitting with catfood thread. Helps with the uneven bloodsugar problem, especially ones in cans with extra gravy.
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#20 Maureen

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Posted 29 April 2017 - 04:01 PM

I just got 2 of these this morning in the mail. The timing was really good, I was on the verge of an SOS thread. I did 2 sprays and I think it was too much.

Next time I use it, I will just do a single one. It burns, but it works pretty well so far.

I am also using patches. It's something I just have to do right now. I don't want to smoke cigarettes. I have to make this quit stick. Everything depends on it and I'll try anything.

 

I tried lozenges and hated them. 


 

                                                                                    Quit Date: July 27, 2017               

 

 

 

 






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