Jump to content


Photo

Why is nicotine such a small part of the addiction?


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#21 Autumn

Autumn

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 409 posts
  • quitdate:
    2016-11-01
  • LocationMee-Knee-Soo-Tahh

Posted 21 March 2017 - 07:42 PM

I am getting a little tired of you putting out this BS when people here are trying to overcome their addiction to Nicotine. You are giving out unfounded information and it is not appreciated on this forum.

 

You are obviously no expert on nicotine addiction and I would appreciate if you keep you conspiracy theories and the subject about violent diarrhea to possibly a different forum, where they have an interest in discussing those subjects.

 

If you continue, your posts will be moved to pointless and if you start with even more bizarre advice and not focus directly on your quit and accept advice from the more knowledgeable about the the basic way to quit smoking, then you may have to leave the board altogether.

 

I decided to take to researching the alleged unfounded information by doing some research. I made sure to only look at those articles/studies that have been peer reviewed and credibly published.

 

8yi0so.png

 

Also, there are various medical professionals backed by peer research that have spoken on nicotine working in a similar manner to how ramcon suggests, such as Joseph DiFranza, a medical doctor who has specialized in tobacco studies since 1980, and Dr. Peter Killeen, a credited behavioral neuroscientist who has published quite a few studies on addiction that coincide with his focus on behavioral conditioning / incentive. To back my statements up, I'll include some links below that document their status and credibility. They both have some interesting lectures on their findings available on YouTube and other video medias. I have watched them, but I won't share them or links to them here, just incase they are somehow inappropriate (they do mention certain devices). Both DiFranza and Killeen agree that for smokers, nicotine is an addictive agent. DiFranza focuses on the toxicity of nicotine on its own. Peter Killeen has done more research on the effects of nicotine on the non-smoking brain and both fully supports and directly states the idea that rancom suggested about how "In fact, to never smokers, it is nearly impossible to get addicted to pure nicotine in any form." It's important to note, however, that he stresses that because no one to date has smoked pure nicotine on its own versus tobacco as a whole, that there are no grounds to argue that nicotine is harmless, regardless of how addictive it may or may not be. He also stresses that the reasons behind nicotine being essentially non-addictive to never smokers has to do with the chemical changes that occur in the brain when someone ingests tobacco products. Feel free to search for their lectures on YouTube if you are interested, it's interesting stuff. :)
 

Credibility Links:

https://profiles.uma.../display/133044
https://www.abainter...terkilleen.aspx

 

As for the idea that nicotine is being researched as a viable drug for certain conditions, absolutely. If you google it you'll see tons of stuff pop up where nicotine (not tobacco, but nicotine) is being considered medicinally to aid diseases, two bid ones being Parkinsons and schizophrenia. There's a ton of published, credible research online to back that up. Check out "nicotine medicinal Parkinsons" or "nicotine medicinal schizophrenia" on Google if you want to see more.

 

I'll include some of the results I've found, since the burden of proof is on the one making their claim. :P
https://today.duke.e...edicaluses.html >> nicotine therapy considered for parkinsons/altzheimers

https://deepblue.lib...e=1&isAllowed=y >> nicotine consideration for parkinsons

http://umm.edu/healt...kinsons-disease >> cites nicotine as a possible protective factor for parkinsons

https://www.georgeto...e-nicotine.html >> nicotine may slow progression of alzheimer's

https://web.as.uky.e...cotineSchiz.pdf >> nicotine and its interactive properties with schizophenia

https://dspace.libra...ndle/10968/1744 >> nicotine's neurobiological effects on schizophrenic selective attention

 

etc etc

 


  • avian3 likes this

make-out-kittens.gif

 

588f4b6552.png


#22 avian3

avian3

    Mellow Yellow

  • Administrators
  • 14,220 posts
  • LocationSouthern California

Posted 21 March 2017 - 09:35 PM

I decided to take to researching the alleged unfounded information by doing some research. I made sure to only look at those articles/studies that have been peer reviewed and credibly published.

 

8yi0so.png

 

Also, there are various medical professionals backed by peer research that have spoken on nicotine working in a similar manner to how ramcon suggests, such as Joseph DiFranza, a medical doctor who has specialized in tobacco studies since 1980, and Dr. Peter Killeen, a credited behavioral neuroscientist who has published quite a few studies on addiction that coincide with his focus on behavioral conditioning / incentive. To back my statements up, I'll include some links below that document their status and credibility. They both have some interesting lectures on their findings available on YouTube and other video medias. I have watched them, but I won't share them or links to them here, just incase they are somehow inappropriate (they do mention certain devices). Both DiFranza and Killeen agree that for smokers, nicotine is an addictive agent. DiFranza focuses on the toxicity of nicotine on its own. Peter Killeen has done more research on the effects of nicotine on the non-smoking brain and both fully supports and directly states the idea that rancom suggested about how "In fact, to never smokers, it is nearly impossible to get addicted to pure nicotine in any form." It's important to note, however, that he stresses that because no one to date has smoked pure nicotine on its own versus tobacco as a whole, that there are no grounds to argue that nicotine is harmless, regardless of how addictive it may or may not be. He also stresses that the reasons behind nicotine being essentially non-addictive to never smokers has to do with the chemical changes that occur in the brain when someone ingests tobacco products. Feel free to search for their lectures on YouTube if you are interested, it's interesting stuff. :)
 

Credibility Links:

https://profiles.uma.../display/133044
https://www.abainter...terkilleen.aspx

 

As for the idea that nicotine is being researched as a viable drug for certain conditions, absolutely. If you google it you'll see tons of stuff pop up where nicotine (not tobacco, but nicotine) is being considered medicinally to aid diseases, two bid ones being Parkinsons and schizophrenia. There's a ton of published, credible research online to back that up. Check out "nicotine medicinal Parkinsons" or "nicotine medicinal schizophrenia" on Google if you want to see more.

 

I'll include some of the results I've found, since the burden of proof is on the one making their claim. :P
https://today.duke.e...edicaluses.html >> nicotine therapy considered for parkinsons/altzheimers

https://deepblue.lib...e=1&isAllowed=y >> nicotine consideration for parkinsons

http://umm.edu/healt...kinsons-disease >> cites nicotine as a possible protective factor for parkinsons

https://www.georgeto...e-nicotine.html >> nicotine may slow progression of alzheimer's

https://web.as.uky.e...cotineSchiz.pdf >> nicotine and its interactive properties with schizophenia

https://dspace.libra...ndle/10968/1744 >> nicotine's neurobiological effects on schizophrenic selective attention

 

etc etc

I will take a look at these when I have nothing but time to read in a couple of days.  :)


Quit September 14, 2010                                                             
event.png  

 

 

 

 

 

 


#23 Autumn

Autumn

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 409 posts
  • quitdate:
    2016-11-01
  • LocationMee-Knee-Soo-Tahh

Posted 22 March 2017 - 12:06 AM

^^ Like. :P :)


  • avian3 likes this

make-out-kittens.gif

 

588f4b6552.png


#24 lisapoker

lisapoker

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts

Posted 23 March 2017 - 11:59 AM

I agree with the nicotine point. Nicotine is mostly out of your body in 12 hours or so....so how do explain sleeping at night?
I took Alan cars class in NYC and I do believe it is more habit. Why would you wear a patch or chew gum. It is like giving a alcoholic some drinks to get off alcohol...we don't do that do we? Yes, I realize that you are cutting out the tar and chemicals with the gum and so on but, honestly I have a friend who is chewing 40 pieces of a gum a day that only smoked 10 to 15 a day!

I know I'm going to get some bashing. But, think about it, please.

I was a chain smoker when I drank , then, maybe 5 one day or 2 one day and if I left my house for 10 hours a day I did not take or crave a cigerette. When I sat on my terrace, needed a cig. Talked on the phone , needed a cig.

People are different kind of smokers.
I also have a friend that smokes 2 packs a day. Now she is addicted to nicotine but, she believes that in her mind more than me and tells herself that all day.

It is not just being addicted to nicotine and if you really think that you will never quit is my belief.

#25 GraceLove

GraceLove

    Truly Free

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,123 posts
  • quitdate:
    2017-02-08
  • LocationUSA

Posted 23 March 2017 - 03:25 PM

Nicotine in and of itself is an extremely addictive substance. Could it have benefits when used in a specific way with specific dosages for a specific time frame? Sure...why not? There are hundreds of medications/substances that are extremely addictive that have a place in health care but only under certain circumstances.

 

So...the people that are arguing that it is not a nicotine addiction...do you really believe that you just have a habit of bringing your hand to your mouth over and over and over again while inhaling smoke? It's just a habit? That seems silly. Why would you do a movement that is absolutely ridiculous unless you were getting something out of it...a nicotine fix. Of course, the habit is part of it...but the habit wouldn't exist if it wasn't for the addiction.

 

I don't understand why people don't want to say "I am addicted to nicotine." I am an addict and it is only in admitting this fact that I will be able to recover.


  • MissyCat and Jillar like this

1486537200_15_1_USD_9_default.png

 

30ksjlf.jpg





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users