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Did anyone successfully quit using NRT gum?


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#1 seeking_freedom

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 10:34 PM

I am starting again today with using gum. I found CT withdrawal very difficult. I am hoping to taper down with gum. My question is did anyone successfully quit using gum? Please post and let me know because I like to hear people's experiences. They can help me. Thanks. 


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#2 avian3

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 10:40 PM

How does the gum work? Is it like patches where you step down? I truly am curious. I never looked into these because of their cost, at least the patches. Now I think insurance covers them.


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#3 seeking_freedom

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 10:47 PM

How does the gum work? Is it like patches where you step down? I truly am curious. I never looked into these because of their cost, at least the patches. Now I think insurance covers them.

Hi Avian, the gum is apparently addictive, but my quit smoking counsellor has said it's easier to stop than smoking. She said she's done that with lots of people. They stopped with gum then they later stopped the gum.


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#4 IQuit88

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 10:48 PM

The gum delivers small amounts of nicotine in your blood through the mouth. I haven't used it, but have known others who did and were successful with their quit. Hey, whatever it takes.


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#5 seeking_freedom

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 10:49 PM

The gum delivers small amounts of nicotine in your blood through the mouth. I haven't used it, but have known others who did and were successful with their quit. Hey, whatever it takes.

Thanks. I'd rather not use it but gee I need some help. For me it's worth trying..


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#6 avian3

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 10:53 PM

I guess, just like with the patches, you need to set a particular goal when to be completely off of them. People who used them should have the answer to when that is.


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#7 Jeni

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 10:59 PM

Hi Avian, the gum is apparently addictive, but my quit smoking counsellor has said it's easier to stop than smoking. She said she's done that with lots of people. They stopped with gum then they later stopped the gum.


Hi SF...

For what it's worth, when I quit, I went to a hypnotist. I asked him about using the patch/gum, etc in conjunction with hypnosis. He told me he has as many clients trying to get off NRT as cigarettes. So, yes... I think the gum is quite addictive.

While I think anything is better than smoking, so long as you have a plan to get off of it, I would recommend going cold turkey.

#8 Vanmare

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 11:03 PM

I used patches (not the same, I know) to get me started. After about three days, I could see that I had simply replaced cigarettes with patches and I had to let them go as well. Two days later, I went CT. Having said that, I don't know if I would have made it through those first few days without them. It was like having a few practice days before I took the full plunge.
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#9 silver2014

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 11:19 PM

Hmmm. I started using the gum this time(I'm ashamed of that statement.), but I couldn't tolerate the taste. On day 3, I switched to a 7 mg patch. I knew I couldn't handle a higher dose because I've tried them before, but I needed some help.  I stayed on patches for about 50 days.Then, I had to withdraw from the little patch. To be honest with you, this quit was easier comparatively speaking.  Why?

1) I was motivated. That list is endless.

2) I understood the law of nicotine addiction. I knew my last sickarette was in the past. No more puffs ever!

 

What is the point of this ramble, you ask? I did whatever it took to keep my quit this time. Period.


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#10 Eli

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 11:38 PM

YES, I know of people who have quit using the gum.

From my personal experience I can simply state that it is doable but HARDER than quitting cold turkey.

The quit is pretty much like going to the dentist.

You fret over it for weeks before hand and when you get there it turns out it's not so bad.

Better be done quickly and move on to other things. Could you imagine the dentist drilling for a bit, then taking a break, putting some music on, then drilling a bit more, then another break, then a bit more drilling, break, drill a few more minutes, take another break.... that's what the gum felt for me. Constant lower level crave.
Cold turkey is just a big... booom.. and the tooth is out, don't forget to blink...

 


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#11 Lucy1

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 02:12 AM

First of all I want to say the GUM isn't addictive!  The drug nicotine is what is addictive.  There are a lot of different ways that people ingest nicotine - cigarettes, cigars, snuff, chew, NRT, e-cigs.  Of all those "delivery systems", NRT is by far the least harmful.  It doesn't put tar or other chemical substances into your body.  It's just nicotine, which is not carcinogenic and doesn't in and of itself cause a lot of harm.  But nicotine is highly addictive. 

 

It annoys me when people make universal statements that It is more difficult to quit using NRT than it is to quit CT.  If that was their experience, then it was true for them but they really shouldn't present their experience as if it will be the same for everyone.

 

Using NRT is a way to give your body a much smaller dose of nicotine than you were getting from cigarettes (and there are significant differences between how your body & brain experiences inhaled nicotine vs any of the forms of NRT), while you break the habit aspect of smoking and learn new behaviors.  Your body & brain are adjusting to less nicotine at the same time that your body is detoxing from the dozens of carcinogenic substances in cigarette smoke that are stored in your body, at the same time your body is ridding itself of the tars that have trapped all sorts of substances far more toxic than nicotine.  You reduce the dosage of NRT and taper off on a schedule, and by the time you have finished the program, you're able to stop using nicotine in any form.  I've seen it written here many times that by using NRT you are doomed to going through withdrawal twice.  That's not true.  The discomfort (if any) after a scheduled step-down of NRT is very mild.

 

There are some differences in the forms of NRT -- the inhaler most closely mimics cigarettes, delivering a "hit" of relief within about a minute of using it.  But unlike cigarettes (and e-cigs), which put nicotine directly into the lungs where it enters the bloodstream and gets to the brain within seconds - delivering a jolt that floods and satisfies all the nicotine receptors in the brain at once -- the NRT inhaler delivers it's reduced amount of nicotine in a mist that is absorbed by the mucus membranes in your mouth.  You'll get relief from the intensity of cravings but it won't be anything as satisfying as a puff of a cig deeply inhaled.  The NRT gum or lozenge also delivers nicotine into the mucus membranes of your mouth, but this doesn't reach your brain within a minute -- it's 'more like 10 to 20 minutes.  So these are less similar to the experience of smoking.  The NRT patch is the least like smoking.  There is no hand-to-mouth association, and none of the crave -> take NRT -> relieve crave experience that the lozenge, gum, or inhaler provide. 

 

I quit CT once a long time ago.  It was really hard and gradually got better, and then effortless.  I stayed quit for 10 years.

 

Stupidly, I had just one puff.  Within a few weeks I was smoking a pack a day again.  I tried to quit CT again.  Dozens of times.  I believed all the people who thought it was somehow shameful to use NRT.  I wanted to quit CT!!!  But what happened was that I'd quit and last a day, a few days -- once or twice I lasted a miserable week or 10 days before relapsing again.  I did that for SEVEN YEARS while I mostly smoked - a pack a day.  Finally I got 3D support through a local hospital.  The doctor who lead the smoking cessation class was a former heavy smoker.  He recommended that I start with the 21 mg. patch and urged me to supplement it with as much of the NRT gum as I felt I needed.  He encouraged me to monitor myself honestly and to taper off as it made sense to me.  I understood that I couldn't just use a little gum now and then for a few days and expect to succeed -- I'd already seen that approach fail time after time after time.  So I followed his advice, while also keeping my focus and determination on kicking nicotine addiction for good.  Over a 4-month time period I reduced the dosage of the NRT patch, and used less and less gum.  I consciously decided to stop using gum long before I felt ready to stop using the patch because I didn't want any of that hand-to-mouth, crave-chew gum-relieve crave association.  When I stopped using NRT I was ready.  I did not experience any withdrawal.  I had a solid quit established and it's been 13 and a half years since I stopped smoking this time.

 

I have a lot more to say about NRT if you want to hear it!  Send me a private message if you'd like to dialog more about this.

 

Lucy


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#12 Eli

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 05:28 AM

There was no intent to generalize. Just shared my experience with NTR.
I did said twice in the above post that is "how it felt for me", and "from my personal experience"...
I fully support and believe that whatever works, is best.
Glad you shared your point of view as well.
Lucy, don't be annoyed... It's Saturday :smile:



 


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#13 Blacky

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 06:02 AM

I was on gums for the first 18 days of my quit after which I went cold turkey. It worked out pretty well for me.

 

You can read about my experience going off the gums here


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#14 Cristobal

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 01:51 PM

Joel Spitzer of whyquit.com discusses the dismal success rate of this product, as well as introducing materials explaining why all of the aids out there have done little in helping people to successfully stop smoking.
 
 
Cristóbal
 

► I am a ** OLDE PHARTE ** (1 year + :grin: ) !!!
► I smoked 30 years, 2 packs a day ... Bleah ..... :shock: :shock: :shock:
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#15 Lucy1

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 04:34 PM

There was no intent to generalize. Just shared my experience with NTR.
I did said twice in the above post that is "how it felt for me", and "from my personal experience"...
I fully support and believe that whatever works, is best.
Glad you shared your point of view as well.
Lucy, don't be annoyed... It's Saturday :smile:



 

Sorry Eli!  I didn't mean to snap at you -- I think I was reacting to all the many times in the past when I got grief because I used NRT.  I should have read your message more carefully. 

 

Lucy


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#16 Lucy1

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 04:37 PM

Joel Spitzer of whyquit.com discusses the dismal success rate of this product, as well as introducing materials explaining why all of the aids out there have done little in helping people to successfully stop smoking.
 
 
Cristóbal
 

Anything Joel Spitzer says I would analyze carefully because he distorts facts pretty freely to support his viewpoint.  He is not the absolute expert on smoking cessation.


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#17 joelspitz

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 04:51 PM

"Anything Joel Spitzer says I would analyze carefully because he distorts facts pretty freely to support his viewpoint. "

 

 

Who should you believe?

A smoking cessation expert?

Is cold turkey the only way to quit?

My work in the field of smoking prevention and cessation

Why my resources are free

"Whatever you do, don't quit cold turkey"


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#18 Lucy1

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 06:06 PM

You're quoting yourself?!  I find that amusing.  But thanks anyway.  I've spent a lot of time over the years getting my information from a wider variety of sources.



#19 joelspitz

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 06:17 PM

As some of the longer term members of QSMB may know, I have been a member of the group since early 2000. 

 
If any member searches on my screenname here, joelspitz, you will see I occasionally post directly on the board, though very infrequently. I want members here to know of the free materials that we have made available at WhyQuit.com. Actually, the original owner of QSMB, Fred, hosted my articles at Quitsmoking.com too.
 
Normally I keep a low profile at the site though since I know some of my views can be pretty controversial regarding quitting aids and some of my materials on slip/relapse issues. I don’t want to stir up controversy or debates at QSMB or any other sites and for most of the past 15 some years I have not had to.
 
Unfortunately we recently had a few new members join up who have a problem with me and the WhyQuit.com site. They came from another site that shared their views, often criticizing WhyQuit.com. I want to make it clear, that not all members from that site shared their views but the site administration did so they were quite free to attack our material, credibility and at times, even our motives. 
 
As I said, I normally do not participate much and do nothing to push my views here, but with these new direct attacks on me and my materials I feel the need to personally address comments that are made.
 
Actually, to illustrate how I have participated over the years at the site here, here is one of the last posts I have made here from back in 2008:
 
 
 
I have always tried to make it clear here that while http://www.whyquit.com is a site that advocates cold turkey for quitting, we have also amassed a lot of materials that can be beneficial for people no matter how they quit. 

Here is a copy of a previous post used at the board here addressing how we hope people quitting by various means are able to use http://www.whyquit.com to help support their quits:

I know that some of my views on certain quitting topics can be quite controversial and I really do try to stay clear of these issues when I post at the site here. I also, try to make it clear that some of the materials at http://www.whyquit.com can be controversial, and I do try to warn people going there that they may want to stay clear of certain materials, especially the how to quit section for people who are using medications to quit smoking. 

I am going to copy and paste comments I put up in another string here letting people who read here know of strings that I put up at this board that I hope will be helpful to all people wanting to quit and that I hope stay clear from controversial content: 

I assembled a few strings in the past on this board addressing relapse prevention issues and articles addressing the importance of quitting smoking that I think could be beneficial for newer members to read. I am assembling the links to these threads here in this one string. 

Here are some of the posts I have put up here in the past: 

Is relapse a normal part of the addiction process?

Craves (thoughts) that happen over time after quitting

"Are there Social Smokers?"

Free Online Quit Smoking Video Lessons

Implication of second hand smoke exposure on your quit

Minimizing the most common side effects to quitting smoking

"Quitting smoking is the hardest thing I have ever done
 
A Safer Way to Smoke

Smoking and Circulation

Is this a symptom of quitting smoking?

Smoker, ex-smoker, non-smoker?

I also want to make sure all who read here are aware of the free materials we have made available at http://www.whyquit.com/joel to assist people in quitting. Most of the library materials are compiled in a free downloadable e-book linked on that page. It really comes down accepting the premise that to stay smoke free is no more complicated than understanding to never take another puff. 

I am going to attach the preface of the book below. It kind of captures this premise. I do want to make people aware that the library and the book are broken into sections covering topics like why people smoke, why they should quit, how to quit and how to stay off of smoking. The how to quit section is focused on cold turkey quitting, and people quitting by other methods should probably stay clear of reading the materials on how to quit. The other sections however are likely going to be beneficial for all people quitting, irregardless to what method they are using. 

Also, I want to be sure that all who reads here are aware of the day by day video lessons set up at the site too. I think anyone first starting their quit will find these lessons invaluable. Again though, there are a few videos which are focused on the cold turkey method and I would encourage people using other methods to quit to avoid these specific videos. They are "How did the people you know quit smoking?", "Quitting by gradual withdrawal," "My first encounter with NRT" and "WhyQuit's candid views about Chantix." 

These are four out of 65 video lessons. I am highlighting this because I want to make it clear that the bulk of the materials that we have made available are there for the benefit of all people quitting no matter how they are quitting. I don't want to keep anyone who could benefit from these materials from avoiding them because they are afraid that the site will discourage them from their current quitting methods. Being that the site here is supporting people using a variety of methods and are not pushing any one over another, I am trying to be sure that all of the materials I share here and in all of the participation I occasionally engage in at this site is utilizing information that I truly believe can help all people to secure their quits no matter how they initially quit. I noted above that I was going to add the preface to the e-book. Here it is: 

Preface to the e-book "Never Take Another Puff" 

Never take another puff. It seems so simple. If you want to quit smoking all you need to do is to never take another puff. There you have it-a roadmap for breaking free from one of the deadliest scourges ever to hit mankind. Nearly five million people a year die from smoking. Many knew the dangers and wanted to quit but didn't feel as if they knew how to break away from such a complicated and powerful addiction. Truth be known, this is not a complicated addiction and while on the surface it may seem powerful, in truth, it is not. Yes there are lots and lots of people who smoke until it kills them but it is not that they couldn't quit. It's that they didn't have the understanding of what was needed to quit, and more importantly, what they needed to do to stay quit. Again, the answer to both is to never take another puff. 

Anyone who goes through the trouble of reading this book is going to see that phrase a lot. While it may sound repetitive to the point of being annoying, it is the one key piece of information that will secure your quit. This series of short articles, exploring different smoking issues, was written over a twenty-two year period. They were not written to be a "how to" manual for quitting, but as follow-up reinforcement to support those who had already quit smoking through clinics I had conducted, to remind them of the importance of remaining vigilant in order to stay free. While they were not intended to be a "how to" manual, when compiled and organized as they are here, they may very well serve as an empowering tool to help you learn how to join the ranks of the millions of successful ex-smokers alive today. The more you read the more you will understand why you smoke and why you should quit. You will also begin to grasp how your life can change by quitting. After spending a few minutes reading any article that touches on some aspect of smoking pertinent to you, you will arrive at a sentence spelling out what you need to do to remain free today. Make it through to the end and you will have all the understanding and tools in place to make a commitment that can preserve your health and likely save your life. You will understand that all you need to do to stay smoke-free is to Never Take Another Puff! 

____________________ 

Again, I want to make it clear that I try to totally stay clear of any issues regarding quitting techniques while on the board. The information that I share are only on the dangers of smoking and relapse prevention based materials--information that I think are of value to all people who want to quit smoking no matter how they are trying to do it. 

I don't get by here much but I want all members to feel free to pop up any of the above threads or copy and paste any of these materials whenever they think it would be helpful. Also, if people have quitting questions or concerns I will be more than happy to address them through Private Messages or you can email me directly at info@joelspitzer.com


Joel 

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#20 Lucy1

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 06:55 PM

Joel, your posts to me feel like bullying behavior so please back off.  You wrote a book, you make a lot of videos, you seem very successful and I imagine you even make a lot of money helping a lot of people quit smoking even though you never smoked (!) so why be so defensive about an individual who has an opinion?  I don't happen to like your website or agree with many of your views but I've never "launched an attack". 

 

In the How to Use the Forum message, QSMB quotes the US Surgeon General, and purports to support the approved methods of quitting smoking which include NRT, chantix and zyban.  So when a moderator jumps into a thread that was started by someone who wanted feedback from people who have used NRT, and quotes you and essentially tells the struggling quitter that she's doomed to fail if she quits any way other than CT, I made a comment.  And then you weigh in.  Neither you or the moderator quit smoking by using NRT.  So why is this debate happening here?

 

It is my opinion that something is out of whack with power dynamics at QSMB which negatively affect the mission of truly supporting people who want to quit smoking and who seek the help of their peers.

 

Why don't we agree to disagree?

 

Lucy

quit 13 years ago with the help of NRT


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