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Physical Symptoms after you Quit

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#1 Poprini

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 11:48 PM

Everybody's Quit will be a little bit different but everybody will experience some kind of physical change. This might be the changes associated with healing, such as coughing which often means our lungs are clearing themselves of toxins and impurities. It might be itchy feet, constipation, increased gas, dry mouth, zits or headaches. Some of them we'll be expecting and others will come as a surprise. But you can be fairly sure that whatever happens to you, it's likely to have happened to somebody else. This topic has been created as a way to share this kind of information in one thread. Ask a question, post a reply, share a link.

This forum already has thousands of posts from the many people who have been through here with every imaginable malady/condition. Use the search this forum field at the top of the main board to find and read those existing discussions. Search "Gas stop" and you'll get more than 370 hits! (Thanks for that tidbit Kablooey). There's a topic called Common changes that occur after you quit in the Frequently asked questions subforum. You can also search this topic above, to see what we've got in this thread.

There's great info on Nicotine Withdrawal & Recovery Symptoms at WhyQuit.com and Slocum has also compiled valuable info about How Long Withdrawals Last here.

It is important to note that we are not giving medical advice. If you are concerned about a symptom you are experiencing, you should consult your doctor. As Joel Spitzer says at Freedom: "There is only one piece of medical advice we are comfortable saying applies to everyone. That is, that smoking is deadly and avoiding a relapse to this addiction requires continuing to swallow our tough medicine of knowing to never take another puff!"

Remember that any strange or unpleasant symptoms of a Quit will probably only be temporary and are easily outweighed by the benefits. This little film is about some of the good symptoms and benefits and you can find even more benefits here.

Enjoy!


  • laurengr22 and cindyz911 like this

Feed the addiction and it will stay. Starve it and it will leave.

 

Method: Educated Cold Turkey :: Quit 1 June 2012 :: My Journey: 1 day to 1 year


#2 Poprini

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 11:59 PM

Withdrawal/Recovery Symptoms (from Saskatchewan Lung Association)

Anger http://www.quitsmoki...php?f=2&t=45245
Bad Breath
Boredom
Constipation, Gas, Stomach Pain http://www.quitsmoki...php?f=2&t=23387
Feeling Cooped Up
Cough, Dry Throat/Mouth
Craving For A Cigarette
Depression http://www.quitsmoki...php?f=2&t=44829
Dizziness
Fatigue
Frustration
Happiness
Headaches
Hunger, Cravings
Irritability, Grouchiness
Lack Of Concentration
Lack of Sleep
Loneliness
Restlessness
Tightness In The Chest
Weight gain
http://www.quitsmoki...=500438#p500442

Anger

Anger is part of the process. Don't try to resist it. You don't have to have a reason to feel that way, you just do. Accept it, vent it safely. Deal with the irritating situation by dealing with your feelings rather than suppressing them. Say what’s on your mind without blowing your stack. Anger openly expressed or kept inside creates tension which may create the need for a cigarette. Reducing the tension will reduce your desire for a cigarette. Discuss your anger with your buddy. Take a walk. Do deep breathing exercises.

Bad Breath

Brush your teeth more often. Drink lots of water. Your lungs need time to clean themselves as they attempt to remove the deposits of tar.

Boredom

Try new things. Keep your hands and mind busy. Write a letter, do dishes, cook, paint, do carpentry, knit, garden, sew. Run some errands, get caught up on jobs you haven’t had time to do, or go see a movie.If you have to stay in one place, have a book, crossword puzzles or a deck of cards handy.

Constipation, Gas, Stomach Pain

What is the cause?
Intestinal movement decreases for a brief period.
How long will it last?
1 or 2 weeks approx
What can I do?
Drink plenty of liquids (6-8 glasses of water daily); add roughage to diet (fruits, vegetables, whole grain cereals, bran); go for walks.

Feeling cooped up

Have a good, long stretch. Then take a short walk.

Cough, Dry Throat/Mouth

What is the cause?
The body is getting rid of mucus which has blocked airways and restricted breathing.
How long will it last?
A few days approx
What can I do?
Sip ice water, drink plenty of liquids (fruit juices, herbal tea.) Try cough drops, chewing gum, hard candy.

Craving for a Cigarette

What is the cause?
Withdrawal from nicotine, a strongly addictive drug.
How long will it last?
Nicotine is largely out of the system in three days although traces can be found up to a month.
What can I do?
Wait out the urges; they only last a few minutes. Exercise, get busy. Drink water.

Depression

Find a substitute reward to smoking. Deal with your emotions. Call your support buddy. Use positive self-talk. Don't cut yourself down; build yourself up. Don’t allow a self-defeatist attitide (I’m no good, I can’t do this). This can lead to a decreased sense of control and a drop in self-esteem. Think of success, not failure! It’s normal to feel sad, angry, or confused in the first few smoke-free weeks. These feelings will pass.

Dizziness

What is the cause?
Body is getting extra oxygen.
How long will it last?
1 or 2 days approx
What can I do?
Get fresh air, go for a walk, change positions slowly.

Fatigue

What is the cause?
Nicotine is a stimulant.
How long will it last?
2 to 4 weeks approx
What can I do?
Get extra sleep and more exercise; take naps; don’t push yourself. If you feel tired when you first wake up, do some moderate exercises and take a cool shower. Drink 6-8 glasses of water per day to speed up the healing process.

Frustration

Take a walk. Do deep breathing exercises. Talk to your support buddy. Think of the positive reasons for quitting and the rewards you will be able to achieve. Take some time by yourself. Do a favorite hobby.

Happiness

There are many ways to celebrate feeling happy without lighting up a cigarette.

Headaches

Take a warm bath or shower. Try relaxation or meditation techniques. Do more physical activities. Cut down on coffee and cola drinks.

Hunger, Cravings

What is the cause?
Craving for a cigarette can be confused with hunger pangs or a simple craving for oral stimulation. For years, your mouth was stimulated every time a cigarette landed between your lips. This has now been removed.
What can I do?
Drink water or low-calorie liquids. Be prepared with low-calorie and low-fat snacks (celery, pretzels, carrots, popcorn, melba toast); chew a toothpick, chew gum, munch on raw vegetables.

Irritability, Grouchy, Tense

What is the cause?
The body is craving for nicotine. Tobacco smokers are in a chronic state of nervous stimulation. Many of the symptoms quitters experience are the result of the nervous system returning to normal.
What can I do?
Deep breathe, take walks, exercise, use relaxation techniques, cut down on coffee and sugary drinks.

Lack of Concentration

What is the cause?
The body needs time to adjust to not having constant stimulation from nicotine.
What can I do?
Change activities, get some fresh air, exercise, deep breathe, listen to music, watch TV, do more physical activity, cut down on coffee and cola, plan workload accordingly, avoid situations that may trigger your desire to smoke.

Lack of Sleep

What is the cause?
Nicotine affects brain wave function. This can influence sleep patterns and dreams about smoking are common.
How long will it last?
1 week approx
What can I do?
Take a hot, relaxing bath, avoid caffeine (coffee, tea, pop) after 6:00 pm. Try relaxing at bedtime with a glass of warm milk, deep breathing and relaxation techniques. Work on a hobby.

Loneliness

Cigarettes are seen by many people as a close friend. Call a real friend. Go for a walk or a drive.

Restlessness

Work on a hobby. Catch up on your chores. Do some extra jobs at work. Be active.

Tightness in the Chest

What is the cause?
It is probably due to tension created by the body’s need for nicotine; may be caused by sore muscles from coughing. Part of the recovery process may be the lungs attempt to remove mucus and tar. The normal mucus transport system will start to reactivate itself, which can initially cause coughing.
How long will it last?
A few days approx
What can I do?
Deep breathing and relaxation techniques. Be patient. Wait it out! Your body wants to return to normal.
  • cindyz911 likes this

Feed the addiction and it will stay. Starve it and it will leave.

 

Method: Educated Cold Turkey :: Quit 1 June 2012 :: My Journey: 1 day to 1 year


#3 Poprini

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 12:29 AM

Weight Gain info at whyquit.com: http://www.whyquit.c... ... _Gain.html

You may have heard that you can't deal with weight control issues at the same time as quitting smoking. It may be fine for some people to gorge themselves while quitting smoking and deal with the weight at a later time. The health implication of a minor weight gain is negligible in comparison to the health risks posed by smoking. The average smoker would have to gain over 75 to 100 pounds to put the additional workload on the heart that is experienced by smoking, and this is not saying anything about the smoking cancer risk.

But for esthetic and emotional reasons, allowing uncontrolled eating and the inevitable weight gain is a mistake that will often undermine the quitting process. Discouragement over appearance can cause some to return to smoking. Then the smoker has the additional problem of the extra weight combined with smoking. Sometimes the weight does not automatically disappear by simply relapsing back to smoking.

Weight gain following smoking cessation can be due to several factors. Smoking can have an effect on a person's metabolism and thus quitting can account for a small weight gain in some individuals. Gains of 5 to 10 pounds over a number of months can be attributed to metabolic alterations in some individuals. But once weight gain exceeds 10 pounds, other factors are more probably responsible.

Snacking between meals or increasing the overall size of meals, can easily result in the consuming of several hundred extra calories per day. Eating just an additional 100 calories a day will result in a one pound fat gain in just over a month, 10.4 pounds in one year, and an extra 104 pounds in ten years. 104 pounds of fat from drinking the equivalent of one extra soft drink per day. This is why you often hear, "I didn't eat that much more but gained excessive amounts of weight!" True, they may not have eaten that much more daily, but they did it everyday, and the cumulative effect can easily account for the "mysterious" weight gain.

Some ex-smokers eat more because they are just hungrier. They find themselves snacking between meals or needing to eat at times that were never necessary before. If they wait to eat too late in the day or there is too much time between meals, they may start to experience symptoms such as headaches, sleepiness or lack of energy. This can be a real side effect of smoking cessation.

The reason for the new sense of hunger is due to the fact that nicotine is an appetite suppressant. Smoking between meals seems to eradicate the need for the snacking behaviors experienced by many ex-smokers. Nicotine does this by elevating the blood sugar and blood fat levels, basically tricking the body into thinking that it has eaten more than it actually has. While that may help to control weight, it does so at a risk. Cigarettes used as an appetite suppressant can cause cancer, heart disease, strokes and a host of other illnesses.

The ex-smoker is no longer constantly administering an appetite suppressant. This does not mean he or she needs to increase caloric intake. It may be a matter of redistributing food normally eaten at single sittings at large meals into numerous smaller meals spaced throughout the day. This can allow for the snacking between meals ex-smokers are notorious for without increasing overall caloric intake. As an example, if breakfast consists of cereal, muffin, eggs, and a glass of juice, instead of eating all that food in one sitting, it can be dispersed over two or three times keeping a more even distribution of blood sugar throughout the morning hours. The same rule can apply to lunch and dinner, allowing for numerous snacking times throughout the day.

A more insidious mechanism of increased caloric intake can be experienced by unwittingly eating more at the end of meals. The smoking of a cigarette used to signify the end of a meal. With no cigarette to serve as a cue, the ex-smoker may continue to consume extra food after every meal whether or not he or she is hungry. The ex-smoker may not even know that they have eaten more in the process.

One solution to this behavior can be planning the meal out in advance. Calculate and prepare the amount of food you used to consume while smoking and acknowledge to yourself that you have finished. Another way is leave the table immediately upon completion of the meal. If you must stay at the table have a glass of cold water or a non-caloric beverage present. Don't leave a plate with scraps or desserts in easy reach.

Another very good solution is getting up and brushing your teeth. This can become the new cue for the end of the meal as well as improve dental hygiene. The clean feeling in your mouth may be a new pleasurable experience for an ex-smoker. While smoking, brushing of the teeth was often followed by a cigarette, compromising the overall cleansing process.

Besides controlling consumption, exercise is another tool to help with weight control efforts after quitting smoking. Twenty to thirty minutes of exercise done every other day can offset the metabolic alteration accompanied by smoking cessation. If you are eating "a little more," then more exercise can help offset that, too. But be realistic. You have to do a lot of activity to burn off a relatively small amount of food. That is not to say it is a waste of time to exercise to lose weight; just don't eat food with a shovel and go for a short walk and expect to work off the difference.

Successful weight control while quitting smoking can be accomplished with a little extra effort and planning. If weight gain is experienced during smoking cessation, steps should be implemented as soon as possible to reverse the process. Then to maintain a healthy lifestyle, watch your food consumption, exercise regularly, and most importantly - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

By Joel Spitzer
From Joel's Reinforcement Library

Feed the addiction and it will stay. Starve it and it will leave.

 

Method: Educated Cold Turkey :: Quit 1 June 2012 :: My Journey: 1 day to 1 year


#4 Poprini

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 12:31 AM

Minimizing the Most Common Side Effects to Quitting Smoking
from whyquit.com

Blood sugar plummets in many people when first quitting. The most common side effects felt during the first three days can often be traced back to blood sugar issues. Symptoms such as headache, inability to concentrate, dizziness, time perception distortions, and the ubiquitous sweet tooth encountered by many, are often associated with this blood sugar drop. The symptoms of low blood sugar are basically the same symptoms as not having enough oxygen, similar to reactions experienced at high altitudes. The reason being the inadequate supply of sugar and/or oxygen means the brain is getting an incomplete fuel. If you have plenty of one and not enough of the other, your brain cannot function at any form of optimal level. When you quit smoking, oxygen levels are often better than they have been in years, but with a limited supply of sugar it can't properly fuel your brain.

It is not that cigarettes put sugar into your blood stream; it is more of a drug interaction of the stimulant effect of nicotine that affects the blood sugar levels. Cigarettes cause the body to release its own stores of sugar and fat by a drug type of interaction. That is how it basically operated as an appetite suppressant, affecting the satiety centers of your hypothalamus. As far as for the sugar levels, nicotine in fact works much more efficiently than food. If you use food to elevate blood sugar levels, it literally takes up to 20 minutes from the time you chew and swallow the food before it is released to the blood, and thus the brain, for its desired effect of fueling your brain. Cigarettes, by working through a drug interaction cause the body to release its own stores of sugar, but not in 20 minutes but usually in a matter of seconds. In a sense, your body has not had to release sugar on its own in years, you have done it by using nicotine's drug effect!

This is why many people really gorge themselves on food upon cessation. They start to experience a drop in blood sugar and instinctively reach for something sweet. Upon finishing the food, they still feel symptomatic. Of course they do, it takes them a minute or two to eat, but the blood sugar isn't boosted for another 18 minutes. Since they are not feeling immediately better, they eat a little more. They continue to consume more and more food, minute after minute until they finally they start to feel better. Again if they are waiting for the blood sugar to go up we are talking about 20 minutes after the first swallow. People can eat a lot of food in 20 minutes. But they begin to believe that this was the amount needed before feeling better. This can be repeated numerous times throughout the day thus causing a lot of calories being consumed and causing weight gain to become a real risk.

When you abruptly quit smoking, the body is in kind of a state of loss, not knowing how to work normally since it has not worked normally in such a long time. Usually by the third day, though, your body will readjust and release sugar as it is needed. Without eating any more your body will just figure out how to regulate blood sugar more efficiently.

You may find though that you do have to change dietary patterns to one that is more normal for you. Normal is not what it was as a smoker, but more what it was before you took up smoking with aging thrown in. Some people go until evening without eating while they are smokers. If they try the same routine as ex-smokers they will suffer side effects of low blood sugar. It is not that there is something wrong with them now, they were abnormal before for all practical purposes. This doesn't mean they should eat more food, but it may mean they need to redistribute the food eaten to a more spread out pattern so they are getting blood sugar doses throughout the day as nature really had always intended.

To minimize some of the real low blood sugar effects of the first few days it really can help to keep drinking juice throughout the day. After the fourth day though, this should no longer be necessary as your body should be able to release sugar stores if your diet is normalized. If you are having problems that are indicative of blood sugar issues beyond day three, it wouldn't hurt talking to your doctor and maybe getting some nutritional counseling. In order to allow your body to maintain permanent control over the amount of glucose (sugar) in your brain ... NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

Feed the addiction and it will stay. Starve it and it will leave.

 

Method: Educated Cold Turkey :: Quit 1 June 2012 :: My Journey: 1 day to 1 year


#5 ggbsy

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 12:33 AM

This is great! Except for the expected "how long will it last..." Everybody is different, and for the most part my symptoms lasted way longer than the "expected"... Where the "should last..." was 1 or 2 weeks, mine was 3 or 4 months... So nobody should worry if they don't "fit into" the expected timetable, we all get there eventually.
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#6 Poprini

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 03:05 AM

By Joel Spitzer

Smoking did not cause everything. It causes a whole lot of things though and many things that it does not cause, it makes worse. On the same token, quitting does not cause everything. Quitting is usually accompanied with many repairs, but there are also some adjustments that go on that may need a partnership with your physicians to get worked out.

My general rule of advice is whatever happens the first few days of a quit, whether it is physical or psychological reactions, blame it on not smoking. It is probably the cause of most early quit reactions. If it is a symptom to a condition that could be life threatening, such as severe chest pains or signs or symptoms of a stroke-contact your doctor immediately. While it is probably nothing and just a side effect of quitting, in the long shot that it is something else coincidentally happening the week you are quitting, you need to get it checked out.

Things happening weeks, months, years or decades after your quits though should not ever be assumed to be a quit smoking reaction. It is life going on without smoking. Some of these things may trigger smoking thoughts-especially if they are similar to conditions you did have in the past when you were a smoker. The situation now is a first time experience with a prior feeling where smoking was integrates thus creating smoking thoughts. But even in this case, the condition is creating a smoking thought, it is not that your smoking memories or your smoking past is creating the condition.

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Feed the addiction and it will stay. Starve it and it will leave.

 

Method: Educated Cold Turkey :: Quit 1 June 2012 :: My Journey: 1 day to 1 year


#7 Guest__*

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 03:44 AM

Thanks for taking all that time to do this, it's going to be a great help.

#8 Poprini

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 08:01 AM

Every Hurt is a Heal: The Quitters Flu
by CAMERON KELLETT from http://www.achoice2live.com/

The quitters flu; a number of symptoms that combine in such a manner that they closely resemble a cold or flu like illness.

Most people who quit smoking will experience it. The symptoms can be headaches, runny nose, flashes of hot and cold, chest congestion, cough, sore throat and nasal congestion. The moment you quit smoking your body begins to heal and as a result, these physical symptoms will occur.

The most notable of these flu like symptoms are those associated with the respiratory system. The lungs contain small hair like structures called cilia. (They look more like sea anemones.) These cilia, naturally sweep particles out of the wind pipe to be expelled by coughing. Tobacco smoke coats the lungs with tar and disrupts this process by preventing the cilia from working. When you quit smoking, the tar begins to break down and the cilia once again start cleaning. Quitters will likely notice a blackish – brown and often speckled phlegm as a result. Given the amount of rubbish that builds up in a smokers lungs, this can be quite extreme and often takes time to settle down.

The symptoms of quitters flu should start to settle after a few weeks. The ability to breath easier and maintain a greater state of healthiness, more than make up for the unpleasantries of quitters flu.

Tips for Managing the Quitters Flu.

Rest During the Early Stages.
Quitters flu is at its worst in the early days of a quit smoking campaign. It may help to rest and be as comfortable as possible, while allowing the healing process to happen. Consider drinking warm herbal teas to aid relaxation and relieve some of the symptoms.

Eat Quality Foods and Micro Nutrients.
The body gets the majority of nutrients needed to heal, from the foods we eat. If these foods are of a high quality and have sound nutritional value, the more building blocks your body will have to aid the process. Consider eating more fresh fruit and vegetables and less processed and over cooked foods.

When You Feel Ready, Get Some Exercise.
Exercise promotes healthy lung function and helps accelerates the cleaning process. Consider starting with a daily, fast paced, five minute walk around the block.
  • AmandaG and jax4211 like this

Feed the addiction and it will stay. Starve it and it will leave.

 

Method: Educated Cold Turkey :: Quit 1 June 2012 :: My Journey: 1 day to 1 year


#9 Poprini

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 08:22 AM

Info on sleeping problems at whyquit.com: http://whyquit.com/j...3_22_sleep.html
  • AmandaG likes this

Feed the addiction and it will stay. Starve it and it will leave.

 

Method: Educated Cold Turkey :: Quit 1 June 2012 :: My Journey: 1 day to 1 year


#10 Merson

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 06:35 PM

Poperini:

What a fantastic montage of information and tapes - thank you so much. After 40 plus years of horrible addiction and a really bad health scare on May 14th, I was determined to quit and yet so terrified of the challenge. That said this site and the information and experiences that are being shared by people like you really inspire me and fill me with hope and confidence for the future. Nearly through day 50 - NOPE. Cheers.
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#11 Poprini

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 06:00 AM

What a fantastic montage of information and tapes - thank you so much. After 40 plus years of horrible addiction and a really bad health scare on May 14th, I was determined to quit and yet so terrified of the challenge. That said this site and the information and experiences that are being shared by people like you really inspire me and fill me with hope and confidence for the future. Nearly through day 50 - NOPE. Cheers.


That's really sweet of you to say Merson. Congratulations you superstar - day 50 indeed! All the best, Li

Feed the addiction and it will stay. Starve it and it will leave.

 

Method: Educated Cold Turkey :: Quit 1 June 2012 :: My Journey: 1 day to 1 year


#12 Skittle

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 10:16 PM

Zits!!!! That is all!! :evil: :lol:

~One Day At A Time~
You swam out from the boat and went down about 10 yards from the shore, you were nearly there! (Loudub)
......and the band played on!! (Breath)
Quit journey started July 5th 2012, relapsed but not giving up on giving up!!
Quit 8th May 2016

 

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#13 Markus

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 11:33 PM

Li,

Very nice! This should be a sticky IMO right below the newbie package, Main Board top of the page. That way we don't need to bump it all the time and can make reference to it on the "Introduce yourself" thread. :)

I this QSMBADMIN or Fred Kelley would be receptive to that.

thanks,

markus
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#14 Skittle

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 11:39 PM

Li,

Very nice! This should be a sticky IMO right below the newbie package, Main Board top of the page. That way we don't need to bump it all the time and can make reference to it on the "Introduce yourself" thread. :)

I this QSMBADMIN or Fred Kelley would be receptive to that.

thanks,

markus


DITTO!!!!

~One Day At A Time~
You swam out from the boat and went down about 10 yards from the shore, you were nearly there! (Loudub)
......and the band played on!! (Breath)
Quit journey started July 5th 2012, relapsed but not giving up on giving up!!
Quit 8th May 2016

 

1462633200_10_1_USD_10_default.png


#15 Poprini

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Posted 28 July 2012 - 07:55 AM

If anyone has some interesting info/tips on this subject, please feel free to add! x

Feed the addiction and it will stay. Starve it and it will leave.

 

Method: Educated Cold Turkey :: Quit 1 June 2012 :: My Journey: 1 day to 1 year


#16 Garrett

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 04:59 PM

For me, each day since I quit was different. I quit by cutting back and then cold turkey.

I did have cravings the first few days, but I was in a very odd state. I was drinking as much water as possible, and going to the bathroom about every 30 minutes. I was very dizzy, and it's almost like I was in a dream-state. I don't remember much from those first few days.

On day 4 or 5 I had a lot of nausea. Then a few days after that I had a strong headache. Then a few days after that I was very tired. Yesterday I was very tired, as well.

I would just wake up in the morning and say, "Okay, today is headache day" and that would be okay. I identified the problem and realized it was a positive sign that my body was recovering from my nicotine addiction. I read that nicotine affected every single organ in my body. They all need to go through some type of healing process...
I smoked my last cigarette on March 16, 2013.

#17 Poprini

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Posted 31 July 2012 - 03:39 AM

by Joel Spitzer

All recent quitters need to be aware of two things that can happen when getting cold or flu near the time that they quit smoking. First, a cold may be more annoying than normal. If anyone gets a cold within a few months of a quit, it is often a really uncomfortable one. The reason being not only are you producing excessive mucous from the infection itself, but since your Cilia are still in the process of cleaning out of the built up mucous that has been accumulated over the years and decades that never had a chance of coming out before, the amount of congestion and the symptoms can really make a person miserable.

Also, with nerve cells that have now regenerated throughout your whole respiratory tract functioning normally, you can feel pain and irritation that were dulled when you were a smoker. It may have taken you a little longer as a smoker to even know when you were getting sick. With impaired nerve cells you may not have felt earlier symptoms, or if you did you may not have been able to differentiate what was just an effect of smoking too much or of actually having some sort of infection. With nerve cells back in place you are likely not going to be overly tempted to smoke for the concept of pouring hot irritating smoke on an already irritated throat is generally not a pleasant thought.

Where you do have to be careful and aware, is that when your cold starts to dissipate, you might get stronger than normal thoughts for cigarettes. For while you likely cut back on cigarette consumption when you were a smoker with a cold, when you started to get better you would have to make up for lost time, or more accurately, for lower than normal nicotine levels since you had instinctively cut cigarettes down to a bare minimum in those times. This makes the first time getting well a potentially powerful trigger. Just be aware of the fact and it will help you to minimize the effect. Then know that over your lifetime, your colds will probably be less frequent, resolve quicker and be less severe as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Feed the addiction and it will stay. Starve it and it will leave.

 

Method: Educated Cold Turkey :: Quit 1 June 2012 :: My Journey: 1 day to 1 year


#18 Poprini

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 09:36 PM

If in doubt or concerned, see a doctor.

Feed the addiction and it will stay. Starve it and it will leave.

 

Method: Educated Cold Turkey :: Quit 1 June 2012 :: My Journey: 1 day to 1 year


#19 babs609

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 03:05 PM

Great info! Thanks for posting!

#20 Poprini

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 05:17 AM

I found this diet plan online for helping with post-smoking bronchitis:

http://www.ehow.com/... ... oking.html

1. Eat foods high in magnesium daily. Magnesium acts by soothing your respiratory airway to allow more air to flow through. Foods rich in magnesium include beans, peanuts and pumpkin seeds.

2 Add onions to your diet daily. Onions include potent sulfur substances that lower lung tissue inflammation related to asthma and bronchitis.

3 Consume foods rich in selenium daily. This powerful compound maintains lung tissue elasticity while reducing the inflammation associated with bronchitis and asthma. Foods high in selenium include wheat germ, lentils and cashew nuts.

4 Take ascorbic acid (vitamin C) tablets daily. Ascorbic acid is an antioxidant that treats bronchitis and asthma by helping your body eliminate the free radicals that inflame your airways, causing mucus to thicken. One 500 mg tablet taken daily is the recommended dosage of vitamin C.

5 Add tofu to your diet every day. Tofu is made from soy beans, which are rich in antioxidants called flavonoids. They act by reducing inflammation in the airways of your lungs enabling you to breathe easier. Tofu also helps prevent against lung cancer.

I've added one food from each of these to my daily diet: black beans, apricots, cashews, wheat germ with my morning oatmeal (high in omega-3 fatty acid too, like fish oil), red/green peppers, black grapes, and black beans which are all high in flavanoids. Can't do tofu! Not sure if its proven or helps, but they all are healthy, high in antioxidants and delicious so it can't hurt!


Feed the addiction and it will stay. Starve it and it will leave.

 

Method: Educated Cold Turkey :: Quit 1 June 2012 :: My Journey: 1 day to 1 year






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