Jump to content


Photo

Nicotine good?


  • Please log in to reply
67 replies to this topic

#1 Electricman

Electricman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 218 posts
  • LocationSpreading Electricity... in a town near you

Posted 14 August 2011 - 11:55 PM

Many scary questions have arisen about e-cigs:

Just how much nicotine gets in your brain when you vape one cartridge? Without extensive animal testing this question is not answerable. Extensive animal testing has not been done on e-cigs. The amount of nicotine that you take in from e-cigs will depend on how many cartridges you suck on, how deeply you inhale, how often you partake, and to some extent, how much money you have to buy replacement cartridges. Manufacturers may make claims about the actual dose received but without pharmacological and physiological testing, the answers don't have meaning.

Are e-cigs more addictive than tobacco cigarettes? Again, no one knows yet. The product is too new, and too few people have used it to date. A full blown epidemiology study is required.

Can e-cigs make you sick? Electronic cigarettes use nicotine extracted with petroleum-based chemicals from tobacco leaves and, as such, are artificially flavored. Nicotine is deadly when blood levels reach about 60 mg in a 150 pound male. Quick smoking of sixty tobacco cigarettes would be required to reach this level. One Roanoker, Gus T. Castros, flatlined from a heart attack after he smoked 80 cigarettes over seven and a half hours. He had accidentally reached the 60 mg toxic dose plus some. When nicotine is inhaled, it inhibits blood flow to the skin which is one reason why smokers don't heal well after surgery or from wounds and why smokers develop loads of wrinkles. Also when nicotine is inhaled, it is converted to amino ketones which can cause kidney damage.

Posted Image
Effects of Nicotine

Nicotine changes how your brain and your body function.
Nicotine initially causes a rapid release of adrenaline, the "fight-or-flight" hormone. If you've ever jumped in fright at a scary movie or rushed around the office trying to finish a project by your deadline, you may be familiar with adrenaline's effects:

Rapid heartbeat Increased blood pressure Rapid, shallow breathing


Adrenaline also tells your body to dump some of its glucose stores into your blood. This makes sense if you remind yourself that the "fight-or-flight" response is meant to help you either defend yourself from a hungry predator or hightail it out of a dangerous situation -- running or brawling both require plenty of energy to fuel your muscles.

Nicotine itself may also block the release of the hormone insulin. Insulin tells your cells to take up excess glucose from your blood. This means that nicotine makes people somewhat hyperglycemic, having more sugar than usual in their blood. Some people think that nicotine also curbs their appetite so that they eat less. This hyperglycemia could be one explanation why: Their bodies and brain may see the excess sugar and down-regulate the hormones and other signals that are perceived as hunger.

Nicotine may also increase your basal metabolic rate slightly. This means that you burn more calories than you usually would when you are just sitting around. (For more information on metabolism, see How Calories Work.) However, losing weight from nicotine doesn't give you any of the health benefits that you'd get if you were losing weight by exercising -- it actually does the opposite! Over the long haul, nicotine can increase the level of the "bad" cholesterol, LDL, that damages your arteries. This makes it more likely that you could have a heart attack or a stroke.

NICOTINE AND THE HEART

Impact on Heart Nicotine gets easily absorbed into the blood. As the blood is circulated through all the organs of the body, it can very easily penetrate into each and every cell of the body part. Heart, as the center for blood circulation, receives blood from different body parts through a network of veins and arteries (blood vessels). the nicotine present in the blood damages the walls of arteries by increasing the fatty build ups. it also increases bad cholesterol in blood vessels, blocking the free flow of blood in them.

Therefore, the free flow of blood to heart is obstructed and it consequently results in heart strokes, which are very lethal. Accumulation of unnecessary fatty tissues may also lead to the development of chronic heart diseases.

other major body parts which are affected by Nicotine consumption are lungs. it reduces the oxygen carrying capacity of lungs resulting in a conflict in demand and supply for oxygen in the cells of body, which leads to death or impairment of cells.

Increased heart beat: A dangerous development for people with a pre-existing heart condition or disease or labile hypertension. Nicotine beats the heart to an unusual 20 beats more per minute sending shock waves to an already strained heart. The end result might be a heart attack.

Increased blood pressure: Nicotine puts your blood pressure into over-drive. This is alarming for people with a heart condition or disease.


Strokes

Nicotine can damage active brain cells which directly affect brain function and prevent blood flow to the brain that can cause a stroke.

Cancer

Cancer is the most dangerous consequence of nicotine consumption. Prolonged consumption of nicotine can lead to cancer and other health complications. There are several types of cancer which can be caused by prolonged consumption of nicotine such as cancer on mouth, cervix, larynx, throat, lips and stomach.

Some Other Health-Damaging Effects of Nicotine

There are some detrimental effects of nicotine which can be seen in those people who have been consuming nicotine for a long time like sagging and wrinkles along with dull looking skin, decreased immunity, unexpected weight loss, mouth ulcers, enhanced health risk factors in pregnancy, weak vision problem and vitamin C deficiency.

One and only way to escape these health risks is to quit this addiction which not only keeps you back on a healthy track but also reforms your image in the society.

Before using nicotine , tell your doctor if you have:

heart disease, an irregular heartbeat, high blood pressure or chest pain; a jaw condition called TMJ (temporomandibular joint) disease; an overactive thyroid; diabetes; pheochromocytoma (tumor of the adrenal gland); liver or kidney disease; a stomach ulcer; or asthma or chronic pulmonary disease.

Nicotine and diabetes

American Chemical Society have announced the results of a study showing strong evidence that nicotine is the culprit behind the persistently high blood glucose levels — and the associated complications — seen in people with diabetes who smoke.

"Nicotine caused levels of HbA1c to rise by as much as 34 percent," said Liu, who is with California State Polytechnic University in Pomona, Calif. "No one knew this before. The higher the nicotine levels, the more HbA1c is produced." the study may raise concern over the long term use of nicotine, he added.

Nicotine and Eyes
Nicotine can lead to a number of eye conditions and even blindness. Nicotine's action as a vasoconstrictor makes it harder to pump blood through constricted arteries, leading to decreased blood flow with less oxygen available.
Nicotine gives you an increased risk of age-related macular degeneration or AMD. Macular degeneration is a condition where the central portion of the retina or the macula, that allows us to see sharp detail and color. This leads to the loss of central vision, first blurring and then darkness. Nicotine at least doubles the risk of developing either type of Macular degeneration, wet or dry. Although it was thought stopping nicotine use did not lessen the risk, there are recent studies that indicate this is not true and that quitting does lower the risk of developing this problem.



How Nicotine Affects Erectile Dysfunction

Imagine what it would feel like to be with your partner and not have the ability to perform. What if this impairment was strictly due to a choice you were making every day?

NICOTINE AND CONSTRICTION OF BLOOD VESSELS

Nicotine is a drug that acts like a vasoconstrictor. This means that it causes the arteries and blood vessels to constrict impeding blood flow throughout the body, including the genitals. In order to achieve an erection the male genitalia must have enough blood flow to fill the arteries and vessels causing the penis to swell. If the blood flow is kept from filling the arteries and vessels an erection will not possible.


TESTOSTERONE AND NICOTINE

Hormone levels including testosterone are lowered as a result of nicotine use. These lower levels affect a man’s ability to get aroused and maintain an erection. Testosterone is the main male sex hormone, having low testosterone levels may interfere with a man’s sexual desires.


NICOTINE AND INCREASED FATTY ACIDS

Studies have also shown that nicotine and smoking causes an increase in fatty acids in the vessels. These fatty acids cause a build up that can lead to clogged arteries. This build up can result in impotence due to the lack of blood flow to the arteries and vessels in the penis. Not only can these fatty acids affect sexual performance they can also lead to a heart attack, stroke, and possible death.

THE EFFECT ON SPERM

Not only does nicotine contribute to erectile dysfunction it also can cause males to have a lower sperm count, abnormally shaped sperm, lethargic sperm as well as an overall decrease in the amount of ejaculation produced. These negative effects on the sperm can impede a man’s ability to have children.

Nicotine Hair Loss

Healthy scalp produces healthy hair shafts. Hair shafts arise from hair follicles. Hair follicles are tiny tubular cavities, at the base of hair follicles there exists an bulb like structure called dermal papillae, that multiplies itself gradually to produce hair shaft. Hair follicles are surrounded with hundreds of thousands tiny blood capillaries which carry blood from arteries to hair follicles. Supply of oxygen and nutrients are carried out by blood capillaries. Therefore, nutrients and oxygen transference through blood capillaries is the only fundamental source of follicular nourishment that makes growth of healthy hair possible.

Nicotine produces very powerful effects on arteries and throughout the body. Nicotine is a stimulant that speeds up the heart beats by about 20 beats per minute. Nicotine causes increased blood pressure. It is a vasoconstrictor that means it makes the arteries hard and stiff and blood can not run easily within arteries. Due to negative effects of nicotine, cholesterol is released within the blood that in turn, is extremely harmful for your body.

Prevention: As a first preventive measure, avoid nicotine, you must stop it gradually for the sake of healthy body. To increase the blood flow towards hair follicles and decrease the stiffness of blood capillaries, massage your scalp with natural coconut oil or almond oil. It will really show good results. Coconut oil not only help massage hair follicles, but it contains several chemicals needed for healthy growth of the hair. Therefore, it works in dual way, providing the nutrients and increasing the blood flow rate towards hair follicles.

Nicotine not only causes constriction in blood arteries but also in tiny blood capillaries that carries blood, oxygen and nutrients towards hair follicles. Hair follicles are also susceptible to nicotine and similar chemical substances. Blood capillaries are tiny tubes around singe blood cell in diameter. You can estimate, how vulnerable are blood capillaries to be constricted being single cell in diameter.

As nicotine enters the body, it is rapidly distributed through the bloodstream and reach the brain crossing the blood-brain barrier. Nicotine takes around 7 seconds to reach the brain. Nicotine is a hygroscopic, that is it attracts nearby water molecules. Dermal papilla, the bulb shaped structures responsible for creating new cells exists at the bottom of the hair follicles. Dermal papilla creates the new cells that pushes themselves upwards and force the older cells to move higher. Therefore, production of new hair cells requires adequate supply of oxygen and nutrients.

Dental Health and vaping
The #1 cause of implant failure is Nicotine . Nicotine causes a reduction in oxygen flow to the bone. It does not matter if the nicotine is supplied by inhaling nicotine , smoking tobacco, chewing on tobacco, or chewing gum. The dental implants require oxygen to bond to the bone. When the bone is unable to bond to the implant due to lack of oxygen, discomfort usually results and the implants must be removed.


Studies have shown that even nicotine by itself may do harm to the mouth, gums and tongue. A report published in the Journal of the Indian Society of Periodontology has stated that nicotine may contribute significantly to the development of gingivitis and periodontitis, two gum diseases that can cause breath to smell foul.

Likewise, nicotine may increase the risk of tooth loss and dental decay, which also lead to bad breath. The study suggests that nicotine causes these conditions because it is a vasoconstrictor, meaning it reduces blood flow to tissues in your mouth.

Without proper blood flow in the gums, white blood cells cannot properly fight off bacterial infections and red blood cells bring less oxygen to replenish the gum cells themselves.

Not only can these gum conditions leave your breath smelling less than fresh, but the microorganisms that cause them may have a hand in halitosis, too. The mouth is filled with over 600 varieties of bacteria, according to a 2003 issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology. Many of these tend to flourish in a drier environment, and are called anaerobic bacteria.

When the mouth is dry, these germs can feed on dead cells and food particles emit volatile sulfur compounds (VSC), which can be very smelly. One of the most common VSCs, hydrogen sulfide, smells like rotten eggs.

As a vasoconstrictor, nicotine may contribute to dry mouth by reducing blood flow to the salivary glands. Without saliva, which naturally eliminates some oral bacteria, halitosis can quickly become a problem.



http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC2933534/

Nicotine and Bladder Cancer/Kidney Damage

What is the bladder?

The bladder is a hollow balloon like organ that collects and stores urine. It is a stretchy bag, made of muscle tissue. The bladder is lined with a urine-proof membrane, which stops the urine being absorbed back into the body. The kidneys produce urine and it is then carried to the bladder via the tubes called ureters.

The bladder then stores the urine (approximately 2 cups) until it

is full, it is then emptied through a tube called the urethra, which takes urine out of the body.

In women, the urethra is a very short tube in front of the vagina. In men, the urethra is a much longer tube and passes through the prostate gland and the penis.

What is bladder cancer?

Most cancers are named after the part of the body where the cancer first starts. Cancers of the bladder are nearly always found in the lining of the bladder, they come in many different forms and can behave very differently. Bladder cancer is more common with increasing age, the majority of people diagnosed with bladder cancer are over the age of 50

The exact cause of bladder cancer is not known. There are however, many factors which could increase your risk of getting cancer of the bladder, and Nicotine is one of them.

Nicotine, are absorbed into the blood, filtered out by the kidneys and end up in the urine. The urine is stored in the bladder, so the chemicals are in contact with the bladder lining for some time, causing damage to the cells lining the bladder.

Nicotine can cause many health problems. It can temporarily raise blood pressure and heart rate because it causes blood vessels to narrow. Nicotine can also make the blood more likely to clot and block an artery, and it can cause damage to the lungs and make breathing difficult. Nicotine in the body is first processed by the liver and then excreted by the kidneys. Over time nicotine can have negative effects on the kidneys.

Proteinuria While the exact link between nicotine and kidney disease is still not well understood, those who use nicotine seem to be at a higher risk for proteinuria, explains the American Association of Kidney Patients. Proteinuria is a condition where there is an abnormal amount of protein in the urine.

When the kidneys are working properly, they filter out waste products and leave important substances like protein in the blood, so it is available to the body. If the kidneys become damaged, protein may leak into the urine and be excreted from the body. This can lead to edema or swelling in various areas of the body, and it is a sign that the kidneys may be failing.


http://www.livestron... ... n-kidneys/

NICOTINE CAN FACILITATE THE PROGRESSION AND METASTASIS OF TUMORS INITIATED BY TOBACCO
Our earlier results indicated that nicotine could induce invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cultured lung, breast and pancreatic cancer cells. This study demonstrates for the first time that administration of nicotine either by i.p. injection or through over-the-counter dermal patches can promote tumor growth and metastasis in immunocompetent mice. These results suggest that while nicotine has only limited capacity to initiate tumor formation, it can facilitate the progression and metastasis of tumors pre-initiated by tobacco carcinogens.
http://www.plosone.o... ... ne.0007524

Nicotine induces cell proliferation, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in a variety of human cancer cell lines.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/18844224

Nicotine stimulates human lung cancer cell growth
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/17600315

Role of alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in human non-small cell lung cancer proliferation.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/19040571

Nicotine stimulates pancreatic cancer xenografts by systemic increase in stress neurotransmitters and suppression of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/19131543

In the present study, Line1 mouse adenocarcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into syngenic BALB/c mice. Nicotine administration either by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection or transdermal patches caused a remarkable increase in the size of implanted Line1 tumors. Once the tumors were surgically removed, nicotine treated mice had a markedly higher tumor recurrence (59.7%) as compared to the vehicle treated mice (19.5%). Nicotine also increased metastasis of dorsally implanted Line1 tumors to the lungs by 9 folds.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/19841737


Nicotine Side Effects Report #5392354-7 Nicotine side effect was reported by a Consumer or non-health professional from UNITED KINGDOM on July 10, 2007. Male patient, 61 years of age, was treated with Nicotine. After drug was administered, patient experienced the following side effects: circulatory collapse, myocardial infarction, overdose. Nicotine dosage: unknown. Patient died.


Nicotine Side Effects Report #5232032-8 Nicotine side effect was reported by a Consumer or non-health professional from UNITED KINGDOM on Jan 25, 2007. Male patient, 60 years of age, was treated with Nicotine. After drug was administered, patient experienced the following side effects: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dependence, overdose. Nicotine dosage: unknown. Patient recovered


Nicotine Side Effects Report #5625956-0 Nicotine side effect was reported by a Consumer or non-health professional from UNITED STATES on Feb 14, 2008. Female patient, 45 years of age, was treated with Nicotine. After drug was administered, patient experienced the following side effects: cardiac arrest , overdose. Nicotine dosage: unknown. Patient died.


Nicotine Side Effects Report #5635658-2 Nicotine side effect was reported by a Pharmacist from GERMANY on Feb 12, 2008. Male patient was treated with Nicotine. After drug was administered, patient experienced the following side effects: circulatory collapse, hyperhidrosis, loss of consciousness, overdose, palpitations. Nicotine dosage: 21 MG, QD, TRANSDERMAL. Patient was hospitalized. Patient recovered.

Nicotine Side Effects Report #6016920-0 Nicotine side effect was reported by a Consumer or non-health professional from UNITED STATES on Dec 10, 2008. Male patient was treated with Nicotine. After drug was administered, patient experienced the following side effects: cardiac failure congestive, overdose, treatment noncompliance. Nicotine dosage: 21 MG, TRANSDERMAL. Patient died.


Nicotine Side Effects Report #5525485-9 Nicotine side effect was reported by a Consumer or non-health professional from UNITED STATES on Nov 08, 2007. Female patient, 65 years of age, was treated with Nicotine. After drug was administered, patient experienced the following side effects: cardiac failure congestive, hypertension, overdose, treatment noncompliance. Nicotine dosage: 21MG, TRANSDERMAL. Patient was hospitalized. Patient recovered.


Nicotine Side Effects Report #5416664-X Nicotine side effect was reported by a Health Professional from UNITED KINGDOM on Aug 03, 2007. Male patient, 69 years of age, was treated with Nicotine. After drug was administered, patient experienced the following side effects: ischaemic stroke, overdose, treatment noncompliance. Nicotine dosage: 21 MG, QD, TRANSDERMAL. Patient recovered.


Nicotine Side Effects Report #4785177-0 Nicotine side effect was reported by a Physician from GERMANY on Sept 19, 2005. Male patient, 23 years of age, weighting 187.4 lb, was diagnosed with suicide attempt and was treated with Nicotine. After drug was administered, patient experienced the following side effects:

bradycardia, cardiovascular disorder, intentional misuse, nausea , overdose, somnolence, suicide attempt. Nicotine dosage: unknown . Patient was hospitalized. Patient recovered.

Is There an Easy Way to Quit? August 15, 2011

What is the best way to quit smoking? According to the latest research, the most effective way to quit is by participating in a behavior modification program (such as FFS Online) and combining that with an FDA-approved medication. Sounds simple, doesn’t it? Ha! Becoming smokefree is anything but simple, yet some folks will try almost anything that promises to a quicker, easier way to quit smoking. You can’t wave a magic wand and suddenly be done with the process of quitting. That’s why a program like FFS Online can be helpful since it guides you through the rough patches to your new, smokefree life.

Many FFS Online participants have asked about using other tobacco products to deal with cravings as they quit smoking cigarettes. Here’s why using those other tobacco products isn’t a good way to quit:

Smokeless Tobacco Smokeless tobacco includes chewing tobacco, snuff, snus and some other new products. Some people think that using smokeless tobacco is a safe alternative to smoking but that’s not the case. Smokeless tobacco has 28 cancer-causing agents and it increases the risk of developing cancer in the mouth, gums, and pancreas. The amount of nicotine that is absorbed from smokeless tobacco is 3 to 4 times the amount delivered by a cigarette.

Cigars Cigars contain many of the same addictive, toxic and cancer-causing compounds found in cigarettes. A single large cigar can contain as much tobacco as an entire pack of cigarettes. The health risks from smoking cigars are similar to those from smoking cigarettes, including 4 to 10 times the risk of dying from oral, esophageal or laryngeal cancer in comparison to nonsmokers. People who smoke cigars heavily or inhale deeply also increase their risk of developing COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Hookahs or Water Pipes Hookahs, also called water pipes, are relatively new to the U.S. but hookah bars are growing in popularity. Some people believe that hookah use is harmless. Not so! Because a typical hookah session lasts 40 – 45 minutes, hookah users have increased exposure to the dangerous chemicals in tobacco smoke. Lung cancer and other diseases have been linked to hookah use.

e-Cigarettes There is no scientific evidence establishing the safety of e-cigarettes. The FDA has found that these products contain cancer-causing agents and toxic chemicals, including the ingredients found in anti-freeze. While some distributors directly or indirectly market e-cigarettes for smoking cessation, there is no scientific evidence that demonstrates these products are safe or effective at helping smokers quit.



It's sad that ecig manufacturers say where pretty sure our products are safe?????? Pretty sure? Is “pretty sure” that a product is safe good enough for you, or for your family? If it’s a product that you inhale or ingest, “pretty sure” just does not cut it.

The most frightening aspect of electronic cigarettes is that consumers who do not seek out data and who do not think critically might be convinced by the old hackneyed ad line: "This is Safe!" This same line was shouted by physicians in the 1950's about tobacco cigarettes before the data was in and the truth was known--decades and millions of deaths and inpatients later. We just don't know yet, but if you want to be one of the first poor guinea pigs who reveals the dangers and illnesses associated with e-cigs feel free. Vaping is your right. But stop pushing your unapproved method of nicotine addiction on people who are really trying to be free from this dangerous and extremely addictive drug.
  • FatherSarducci likes this
. http://www.facebook.com/electricmans

Nicotine, the addictive substance in tobacco products, is the most common cause of chemical dependency in the U.S., according to the CDC.

Nicotine is an extremely addictive dangerous drug . Tobacco, ecf/casaa(Consumer Addicts Should Advocate Addiction) are, in effect, drug-pushers. Their income depends on keeping millions of Americans hooked.

#2 greenlover

greenlover

    "REALLY"

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,458 posts
  • quitdate:
    12/04/2011
  • LocationLiving with the Amish

Posted 15 August 2011 - 02:15 AM

Thanks for the reminder about how bad nictine is for people.
  • FatherSarducci likes this

#3 Wintering

Wintering

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 250 posts
  • LocationSF Bay Area

Posted 15 August 2011 - 02:31 AM

..... But stop pushing your unapproved method of nicotine addiction on people who are really trying to be free from this dangerous and extremely addictive drug.


Electricman, thank you for the information. This is EXACTLY why I'm here, asking for help on how to reduce the amount of nicotine I'm using, while I get my health issue under control. (and no, the Celiacs will not improve if I went cold turkey again)

Please, please open your mind and heart. I am in the e-cig subform of a quit smoking message board. I haven't seen anyone trying to "push" this method on anyone.

#4 greenlover

greenlover

    "REALLY"

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,458 posts
  • quitdate:
    12/04/2011
  • LocationLiving with the Amish

Posted 15 August 2011 - 02:43 AM

Wow you haven't-then what would you call it when people come here & brag about how great life is with vaping & for some no intetion of ever stopping-seems like thats pushing a method. To me every day that forum exists it just a reminder that here's a quit method to go along with some tried & true methods used by many successfully & have been around for yrs that has been life saving for many.

#5 Thulium

Thulium

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 178 posts

Posted 15 August 2011 - 03:22 AM

As this is the Quit SMOKING Message board, you probably should have also mentioned that Nicotine addiction appears to be the leading cause of smoking and related illnesses, but you only mention smoking twice:

Can e-cigs make you sick? Electronic cigarettes use nicotine extracted with petroleum-based chemicals from tobacco leaves and, as such, are artificially flavored. Nicotine is deadly when blood levels reach about 60 mg in a 150 pound male. Quick smoking of sixty tobacco cigarettes would be required to reach this level. One Roanoker, Gus T. Castros, flatlined from a heart attack after he smoked 80 cigarettes over seven and a half hours. He had accidentally reached the 60 mg toxic dose plus some. When nicotine is inhaled, it inhibits blood flow to the skin which is one reason why smokers don't heal well after surgery or from wounds and why smokers develop loads of wrinkles. Also when nicotine is inhaled, it is converted to amino ketones which can cause kidney damage.


Cigarette smoking has become the most popular way to consume nicotine because the process of combustion alters the nicotine so as to be quickly absorbed by deep lung tissue and into the bloodstream. Pharmaceutical-grade nicotine as used in electronic cigarettes or pharmaceutical nicotine products like Nicorette can only be absorbed through skin and oral mucosa. If swallowed, nicotine will upset the stomach so it is considered impossible to accidentally consume a lethal dose as the majority would be expelled from the body before it can be absorbed into the bloodstream. If, for example, someone were to attempt to swallow 60 cigarettes (or an equivalent amount of "e-liquid"--commercial cigarette tobacco averages 1.63% nicotine, so 60g would be 978mg of nicotine) would cause immediate vomiting (So don't do it!!) but accidental nicotine and tobacco poisonings are fairly rare and almost never result in more than a "mild" outcome. (Poison Control Annual Report: http://www.aapcc.org... ... report.pdf )


Studies have also shown that nicotine and smoking causes an increase in fatty acids in the vessels. These fatty acids cause a build up that can lead to clogged arteries. This build up can result in impotence due to the lack of blood flow to the arteries and vessels in the penis. Not only can these fatty acids affect sexual performance they can also lead to a heart attack, stroke, and possible death.


Electronic cigarettes have not been tested or approved by the FDA for their effectiveness as a Nicotine Replacement Therapy, but preliminary testing from the FDA on 2 brands found that they contained comparable levels of nicotine and similarly low levels of tobacco specific impurities.


1. NRT is one good tool to help you quit smoking. But NRT can't do all the work for you—you have to help—and it is not the only tool to help you stop smoking.

You could be disappointed if you think using NRT or anything else will make quitting smoking easy. But using NRT could make quitting easier by reducing your cravings or the bad feelings you have when you stop smoking. Like other tools, NRT can help you—if you are also willing to put some work into it. Not everyone will find NRT helpful. Keep in mind that there are other tools available for stopping smoking. You can try other NRT's by prescription such as the oral inhaler and the nasal spray or non-nicotine medications in tablet form such as buproprion or Varenicline (Chantix). You also can talk to your health care provider, call your state telephone quit-line, or call 1-800-QUITNOW for tips on quitting.

2. Don't worry about the safety of using NRT to stop smoking:

NRT is a safe alternative to cigarettes for smokers. Studies show that NRT is a safe alternative to cigarettes for smokers, and DOES NOT cause cancer or heart attacks, even for smokers who already have had heart attacks or heart disease. [size=150">

Also, nicotine is not the really dangerous chemical in cigarettes. Cigarette smoke contains many harmful chemicals, and it is these, not nicotine, that are responsible for the heart attacks, cancer, and lung disease. [/size]The risks of cigarette smoking are much greater than the risks of NRT. Cigarette smoking causes suffering (such as breathlessness, difficult breathing or pain from cancer or heart disease) and, in the end, can cause early death in half of long-term smokers. NRT has been found to be very safe for nearly every user, yet some smokers and even some health care workers have mistaken health concerns about NRT. Some people think that the nicotine patch is dangerous for heart patients, but this is not true. Nicotine and thus NRT does not cause cancer, but some recent studies suggest that it might be better for those who are undergoing treatment for cancer to stop smoking without using NRT. Those diagnosed with cancer should talk with their doctor about whether they should prefer using an FDA approved non-nicotine stop smoking medication (e.g., buproprion [Zyban] or varenicline [Chantix] over NRT.

If you have just had some serious new heart or heart-related problem (for example, heart attack or stroke) within the past 4 weeks, NRT is likely safe to use at that time, but, under these circumstances, you should talk with your health care provider about taking this or any medication. Cigarettes should clearly be avoided just after a heart problem, and NRT, especially the short-acting gum or lozenge, has been used to help individuals with recent heart problems who are having trouble staying off cigarettes. Know that cigarette smoking is very dangerous compared to NRT and you should be avoiding smoking. For those who have not just had a new heart problem and have longer-term heart problems, NRT has been found to be safe to use.

NRT packages come with many warnings and directions that can lead a person to believe that NRT is far more risky than it actually is. It is a mistake to think that any NRT product is as dangerous as cigarettes. NRT does not kill, it saves lives!

3. Do be cautious about using NRT while pregnant.

Some studies suggest that pregnant women should try to stop smoking WITHOUT the use of NRT, if they can. It is very important for the health of the unborn baby to stop smoking cigarettes. If you can quit smoking without NRT, that is great. If you believe that you need NRT to stop smoking during pregnancy, talk to your health care provider; it may still be useful to get you off cigarettes. After the birth of the child, it is still very important for a mother not to smoke, and for NO ONE to smoke around the child.

4. NRT is less addictive than cigarettes and it is not creating a new addiction.

Some smokers worry about becoming addicted to NRT or becoming ‘hooked on’ the gum, lozenge, or patch. While it is true that the nicotine in NRT products is addictive, smokers are already addicted to nicotine—they get a lot more of it from each cigarette they smoke than from any NRT product. Smokers usually do not get as much nicotine from NRTs as from cigarettes, nor do they find NRT as enjoyable to use as cigarettes. This is because breathing in smoke through the lungs gives the brain a rush of nicotine while NRT gives nicotine more slowly through the skin or lining of the mouth. In fact, most smokers don't use enough NRT to get all the help they could to stop smoking. While some smokers could find it hard to stop using NRTs because of the nicotine in these products, there are two important things to remember: first, even using a NRT for a very long time is much less harmful to health than smoking for the same amount of time; second, stopping an NRT is not likely to be as hard as stopping smoking.

5. So, how long should you use NRT?

NRT product labels say that the product should be used for 8 or 12 weeks, depending on the product. For some smokers, this is enough time to stop smoking for good. Some smokers do not need to use NRT that long to stop smoking. Other smokers may need to use NRT for several months or even years to stay off cigarettes. If NRT is helping you not smoke, we suggest you do not even think about cutting down on it unless (a) you believe you have a side-effect from NRT or (B) you have 14 days in a row with no cravings or withdrawal or near slips back to smoking. Using NRT longer than 8 to 12 weeks is not dangerous. Going back to cigarettes is very dangerous and could kill you! In fact, it is a common problem with NRT, that people don't even use it for the whole recommended 8–12 week period. We suggest you stop using NRT only when you feel very sure you can stay off cigarettes. If it ever comes down to a choice of using NRT or returning to smoking, stay on the NRT. A good rule of thumb is that if you are able to easily resist smoking without any cravings in situations that would have made you smoke in the past, you are ready to stop the NRT.

6. If the amounts of NRT you are taking do not help you stop smoking, talk with your health care provider about using (1) more NRT, (2) more than one type of NRT at the same time, (3) other smoking cessation medicines at the same time, or (4) telephone or in person advice on quitting tips.

Even though the NRT packages say you should not use more than one NRT, most experts agree that, for some smokers, using more than one type of NRT product at the same time can be helpful in stopping smoking and is safe. The patch, for example, gets nicotine to your brain very slowly but does so for many hours. Nicotine gum and lozenge get nicotine to your brain faster than the patch (but not as fast as cigarettes) but they deliver nicotine for short periods of time. Nicotine gum or lozenge can be useful to increase nicotine levels at those times when it is very hard to keep from smoking while using the patch alone. Instead of smoking a cigarette when you are wearing the patch, try a piece of the nicotine gum or the lozenge to get over the urge first. These urges to smoke do not last very long. In using more than one NRT product at the same time, pay attention to how you are feeling—your own reactions can be a guide to whether you are getting too little nicotine or overdoing it. Prescription smoking cessation medicines can be used with NRT; but you need to talk with a health care provider about a prescription and whether using that medicine with NRT is a good idea for you.

7. If NRT helps you stop smoking, but you go back to smoking when you stop using NRT, you should seriously think about using NRT again the next time you try to stop smoking.

Many medicines need to be used over and over again to deal with health problems that do not go away completely. For problems like asthma, diabetes, and high blood pressure, medicine often needs to be taken for a long time—not just a few weeks. Just as an asthma medication that helped an asthma attack before is likely to help again, NRT is likely help a smoker stop again if it was helpful before.

Some smokers keep going back to cigarettes after quitting for a time. If that happens to you, you should try to stop smoking again as soon as you can and use ways or tools that helped you quit before. If NRT helped you stay off cigarettes, even for a few days, definitely think about using it again. New NRTs that work better and are more appealing may be available since the last time you quit. If NRT use was not that helpful to you, look for other ways to quit smoking but make sure you were using enough NRT and used it in the best way the first time before you give up on it.

8. Make sure you are using the gum or lozenge in the best way:

• Park the gum between your teeth for 2–3 min between chews — fast chewing does not allow the nicotine to be absorbed from the lining of the mouth and can cause nausea.

• Do not drink anything (including coffee, orange juice, beer, wine, or sodas) for at least 15 min before and nothing while using nicotine gum or lozenge, so your mouth can absorb the nicotine.

Make sure you get the right amount of nicotine — people who smoke more than 10 cigarettes per day should use a 4 mg piece of gum or lozenge.

9. Make sure you are using the patch in the best way:

• If you can't stop having a few cigarettes while using the patch, it is best to keep the patch on. Do not let a few slips with cigarettes stop you from using the patch to quit smoking.

• You may need to add nicotine gum or lozenges to help get over the hump or you may need to use more than one patch at a time. Talk to your healthcare provider about this.

10. The cost of NRT.

If the price of NRT is a concern, try to find “store brand” (generic) NRT products which are often cheaper than the brand name products. There is no reason to think that brand name NRT works better than store brands. And keep in mind how much cigarettes cost. Putting your cigarette money toward NRT can in the long run save you a lifetime of cigarette money. And if you can find the money for cigarettes, you probably can find the money for NRT. Think about buying NRT over the Internet. It is legal to do so and can be cheaper. Some health benefit plans, including some Medicaid providers, pay for NRT, and some state Health Departments and telephone quitlines provide NRT at no cost if you engage in the telephone counseling.

11. Do whatever it takes to get the job done—it is not a weakness to use medicine to stop smoking.

Some people think that if you really want to quit smoking, you should be able to just do it without any help. While it is true that not everyone “needs” medicine to stop smoking, it is also true that not everyone needs medicine to treat asthma, diabetes, or high blood pressure. NRT is only one tool that can help in the hard job of stopping smoking. Those who quit smoking with or without NRT are both making the same smart move for their health—they are becoming ex-smokers.

Levels of addiction vary, and what life throws at you varies from person to person. Maybe one person had an easier time quitting because they were not living or working with other smokers. Maybe one person had a harder time because they had other problems (stress) to deal with. You are not competing with other smokers, you are competing against your cigarettes. If you find NRT helpful and you need to use it for a long time to stay off cigarettes, do not be disappointed or worried—be proud of yourself because you have stopped smoking.

The most important thing about quitting is to stop using cigarettes—it does not mean you are a “better person” with a “stronger will” if you try to quit smoking without using medicine or other help.Kozlowski LT, .Giovino GA, Edwards B, DiFranza J, Foulds J, Hurt R, Niaura R, Sachs DPL., Selby P, Dollar KM., Bowen D Cummings KM, Counts M, Fox B, Sweanor D, Ahern F. Advice on using over-the-counter nicotine replacement therapy- patch, gum, or lozenge- to quit smoking. Addictive Behaviors (in press).

Both the project run by Professor Kozlowski and the translation into Spanish were funded by grants from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Jonathan Foulds PhD Director, Tobacco Dependence Program at UMDNJ-School of Public Health, P.I., Proyecto Vida: Latino Deje de Fumar


Is there any reason whatsoever to believe that smoke-free products that may contain an addictive psychostimulant but have not been approved by the FDA as a smoking cessation aid pose a greater public health risk than sugar-free products that may contain an addictive psychostimulant but have not been approved by the FDA as a weight loss aid?

#6 Thulium

Thulium

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 178 posts

Posted 15 August 2011 - 03:31 AM

Wow you haven't-then what would you call it when people come here & brag about how great life is with vaping & for some no intetion of ever stopping-seems like thats pushing a method. To me every day that forum exists it just a reminder that here's a quit method to go along with some tried & true methods used by many successfully & have been around for yrs that has been life saving for many.


When people talk about "how great life is with vaping" they are talking about how great life is without smoking. Don't you agree that life is pretty fantastic without smoking? THAT is why e-cigarette users can sometime seem a little "too" excited--sometimes its because they're trying to sell something, but more often than not it is because they are so very happy to have finally found a way to avoid smoking that works for them. The overwhelming majority of e-cigarette users have tried to quit more than once and know from personal experience very well how addictive and dangerous nicotine can be, but as I quoted above, the REAL demon is smoking. Lighting something on fire and inhaling the byproducts (even if it doesn't have nicotine in it) is bad for you. The addiction to nicotine is certainly serious, and e-cigarettes allow the user to decrease the amount of nicotine they use at their own pace.
Is there any reason whatsoever to believe that smoke-free products that may contain an addictive psychostimulant but have not been approved by the FDA as a smoking cessation aid pose a greater public health risk than sugar-free products that may contain an addictive psychostimulant but have not been approved by the FDA as a weight loss aid?

#7 TMcGee

TMcGee

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,691 posts
  • LocationEncinitas, California

Posted 15 August 2011 - 03:37 AM

Life is fantastic... after kicking our nicotine addiction to the curb, Thad...

NOT fantastic because some addicts have changed delivery systems of their drug.

Kind of like a heroin addict switching from injecting to smoking heroin because of "harm reduction" -- no longer injecting themselves may lead to less exposure to disease from dirty needles, but they are STILL ADDICTED, and are practicing self-medicating addicts, just like the VAST majority of ecig users/proponents. :roll:

GTQ, KTQ, ETQ


Skip

I have been quit for 4 Years, 4 Weeks, 2 Days, 8 hours, 20 minutes and 36 seconds (1,491 days). I have saved $13,049.28 by not smoking 74,567 cigarettes. I have saved 8 Months, 2 Weeks, 21 hours and 55 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 7/15/2007 12:15 PM
Quit July 15, 2007

#8 greenlover

greenlover

    "REALLY"

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,458 posts
  • quitdate:
    12/04/2011
  • LocationLiving with the Amish

Posted 15 August 2011 - 03:39 AM

Sure not smoking but still getting their nic fix-what a tradeoff huh???

#9 Thulium

Thulium

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 178 posts

Posted 15 August 2011 - 03:43 AM

Sure not smoking but still getting their nic fix-what a tradeoff huh???


Not if you use e-cigarettes to help quit using nicotine AFTER you've broken the addiction to everything else in smoke that isn't in vapor. Canadian e-cigarettes aren't even available with nicotine.
Is there any reason whatsoever to believe that smoke-free products that may contain an addictive psychostimulant but have not been approved by the FDA as a smoking cessation aid pose a greater public health risk than sugar-free products that may contain an addictive psychostimulant but have not been approved by the FDA as a weight loss aid?

#10 Thulium

Thulium

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 178 posts

Posted 15 August 2011 - 04:18 AM

Nicotine is not good.

Nicotine is not bad.

Nicotine is a potentially addictive psycho-stimulant alkaloid of tobacco and other plants and vegetables like tomato, eggplant, and peppers.

Nicotine does not make choices to be either "good" or "bad"; people can make good or bad choices regarding nicotine.

Smoking is an unhealthy choice, and many people choose to smoke cigarettes because they are addicted to nicotine, but they are still making their OWN choice every time they do or do not light a cigarette. Nicotine does not make any choices for you. No one, not even an addict, is a slave to their addiction. We are adults who are defined by the choices we make, not the other way around.
Is there any reason whatsoever to believe that smoke-free products that may contain an addictive psychostimulant but have not been approved by the FDA as a smoking cessation aid pose a greater public health risk than sugar-free products that may contain an addictive psychostimulant but have not been approved by the FDA as a weight loss aid?

#11 Southern Dragonfly

Southern Dragonfly

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 15 August 2011 - 04:14 PM

B. FREEDOM from puffing is what we are all about here....ESPECIALLY the dangerous and highly addictive drug nicotine.


Freedom from puffing may be what YOU are all about but some of us just want to quit smoking. Not gonna argue that nicotine can be dangerous if used improperly and is addictive but what's more important, quitting smoking or quitting nicotine? Because there is a choice. It really isn't as black and white as you try and make it.

#12 Wintering

Wintering

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 250 posts
  • LocationSF Bay Area

Posted 15 August 2011 - 05:29 PM

Excellent information, Electricman! Thank you soooo much for it too. For all of the addicts (and one IS an active addict if they are chronically ingesting nicotine in any way, shape or form). And since we are in the electronic cigarette forum--I will say that that chronically "e-smoking" is NOT quit---


Yikes, I guess that's me! :wink: And hey, I'm addicted to coffee and dark chocolate too.

And I have heard some DOOSEY'S while I have been at this board (and it has been quite a long time)...however THIS one from Wintering takes the cake...

(and no, the Celiacs will not improve if I went cold turkey again)


I was diagnosed with Celiac's disease 16 years ago. Your celiac's disease WILL NOT improve whether you consume nicotine or NOT...(SO DON'T CONSUME IT!) AND if you went back to using nicotine for the "reason" of having celiacs that is a 100% false statement and should read "I went back to using nicotine because I was not ready to quit yet and therefore am going to still abuse nicotine".

THEE ONLY THING that arrests the Celiacs disease is getting OFF OF GLUTEN, 100%.


Awwww Katiem, I'm so sorry. It appears that your one track mind has hindered your reading comprehension ability. PLEASE tell me where I'm stating that ANYTHING would help Celiacs? What I stated was a fact. Gosh, while thanking Electricman, I simply stated that getting off nicotine wouldn't help the symptoms. Is there anything false about that statement? Like you stated, the only thing that will improve the symptoms is to be 100% Gluten free.

I'm not even willing to go back to smoking cigarettes (which kept my Celiacs at bay) because I don't think you can un-ring that bell. I've got it now, and I'm dealing with it. As I stated in my original post, I was feeling soooo horrible - I was tempted to break my quit. But instead, I tried the e-cig, and it's helping me. Gosh, I'd already tried hypnosis, the gum & patch, and even tried Chantix. (ack, now there's a dangerous drug. Why isn't everyone bugging them?) I knew I had to do anything to keep away from cigarettes.

AGAIN, Wintering, I am not trying to be mean--however I am not going to sit here and read 100% False and DANGEROUS information on how to manage celiac's disease.


So it just comes naturally, eh? Katiem, please show me exactly where I've stated anything "100% False and DANGEROUS".

Having said that the "tandem tag-team" Thulium and Wintering" is getting old. And as someone said in another thread---Wintering, if you were here to actually get help, you would not be arguing the case for STILL USING or "going back to use after already being quit".

So, when you are ready to make the commitment to quit---let us know--we will absolutely BE HERE for you! And JUST IN CASE you actually ARE wanting to get off of the nicotine, how many weeks do you have left until you are off of it?


First, the "tandem tag-team" theory has been squashed. There's nothing of the kind. And if you haven't been following my thread, I've already mentioned my target date is 10/17. (my 6th month quit anniversary) I started on 24mgs, down to 18, and now I'm at 12mg. Thulium just gave me wonderful information on how to reduce the mgs down to 8mg. (a gluten free way) From there I'm going to 4mg, and then ZERO.

Katiem, in all sincerity - I know nicotine is not my friend, which is why I am reducing the amount I'm using. Why do you have such a problem with that? Also, (because I am a nice person) please make sure you are gluten free. A dear friend of mine, who's an NMD just sent me some rather scary information. Please google "meat glue". Ohmygosh - I think I'll be going vegan soon.

Wintering

#13 Dutch

Dutch

    Quit date 6/25/08

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,312 posts
  • LocationVirginia

Posted 15 August 2011 - 06:59 PM

Nicotine is not good.

Nicotine is not bad.

Nicotine is a potentially addictive psycho-stimulant alkaloid of tobacco and other plants and vegetables like tomato, eggplant, and peppers.

Nicotine does not make choices to be either "good" or "bad"; people can make good or bad choices regarding nicotine.

Smoking is an unhealthy choice, and many people choose to smoke cigarettes because they are addicted to nicotine, but they are still making their OWN choice every time they do or do not light a cigarette. Nicotine does not make any choices for you. No one, not even an addict, is a slave to their addiction. We are adults who are defined by the choices we make, not the other way around.


Thulidum, this is by far the most idiotic post I have read in my three years here on this forum. Next time you have diarrhea, since you're so powerful and all, go sit on the toilet and "choose" not to crap.

Free since June 25, 2008

 


#14 Thulium

Thulium

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 178 posts

Posted 15 August 2011 - 07:04 PM

Katiem, I don't see anywhere that Wintering said she was doing anything to treat the Celiac's except to avoid Gluten NOW that she has discovered the source of her symptoms. By avoiding gluten, she can avoid the symptoms of Celiacs. By using an e-cigarette, she can avoid the symptoms of inhaling SMOKE 100+ times a day. I believe the only thing she "reintroduced" was the e-cigarette because she had stopped using it until her symptoms were diagnosed as Celiac's. There is a popular waffle flavor extract that I would not be surprised to contain some gluten, but glycerine and propylene glycol are obviously gluten-free so I suggested that she can mix her own "e-liquid" to avoid any flavorings that aggravate her symptoms AND dilute the nicotine to eventually step down to 0-nicotine in celebration of 6 months SMOKE-free.
Is there any reason whatsoever to believe that smoke-free products that may contain an addictive psychostimulant but have not been approved by the FDA as a smoking cessation aid pose a greater public health risk than sugar-free products that may contain an addictive psychostimulant but have not been approved by the FDA as a weight loss aid?

#15 Wintering

Wintering

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 250 posts
  • LocationSF Bay Area

Posted 15 August 2011 - 07:09 PM

Hi Katiem, and thanks.

No, no, no .... for goodness sakes NO! You must have misunderstood me again. I have absolutely NO intention of introducing gluten back into my diet. YOWCH!!!!! Why in the beegeebers would I do that? And I was not trying to give you tips for not eating gluten. (in the exact oposite, I'm sure you can give me lots of advice....but that's not why we're here) I only mentioned the "meat glue" because it's something that was recently (within the past few weeks) was leaked. It's nasty - it would even inspire a meat-eater to go vegan. Please google it. I'd have had no idea our meat was filled with gulten, if my doctor friend didn't warn me.

Once again, in no way, shape, or form did I ever suggest nicotine would help with Celiacs. Never, never in a million years - that would be a completely false and dangerous statement. What I've tried to explain, over and over again ...... I went cold turkey for 10 days. I was feeling physically HORRIBLE. At first, I assumed it was from the withdrawal symptoms. No, it was the Celiacs coming alive when I stopped smoking CIGARETTES. There is something in the cigarette (the 4K other chemicals or even just inhaling smoke?) that prevented the Celiacs from rearing it's ugly head. I have no idea why, but some smart researcher would be a billionaire if s/he could figure it out. Wouldn't it be wonderful to have a gluten blocker - just in case? So no ... it is obviously NOT the nicotine - it's something else in the nasty little stinky.

Because I was cramping so bad, I was about to break. But I was determined not to start smoking again. So in a way, (that most folks here don't seem to appreciate) the e-cig saved me from going back to sticking something in my mouth, and lighting it on fire. That being said, my main goal - just like it was on April 17th, is to be "free". I'm getting there - in steps, just like some folks do with Wellbrutrin, the Patch and Gum. I'm slooooowly stepping down from nicotine - just in a way that works for me.

Wintering

p.s. For everyone reading..... seriously, look up "meat glue". You will be shocked with what you're putting into your body.

#16 Thulium

Thulium

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 178 posts

Posted 15 August 2011 - 07:13 PM

Nicotine is not good.

Nicotine is not bad.

Nicotine is a potentially addictive psycho-stimulant alkaloid of tobacco and other plants and vegetables like tomato, eggplant, and peppers.

Nicotine does not make choices to be either "good" or "bad"; people can make good or bad choices regarding nicotine.

Smoking is an unhealthy choice, and many people choose to smoke cigarettes because they are addicted to nicotine, but they are still making their OWN choice every time they do or do not light a cigarette. Nicotine does not make any choices for you. No one, not even an addict, is a slave to their addiction. We are adults who are defined by the choices we make, not the other way around.


Thulidum, this is by far the most idiotic post I have read in my three years here on this forum. Next time you have diarrhea, since you're so powerful and all, go sit on the toilet and "choose" not to crap.


Dutch, are you saying that nicotine addiction forces people to smoke cigarettes? If that's what you think, why would you treat the victims of such horrible abuse like they are too "stupid and weak" to leave their abuser??
Is there any reason whatsoever to believe that smoke-free products that may contain an addictive psychostimulant but have not been approved by the FDA as a smoking cessation aid pose a greater public health risk than sugar-free products that may contain an addictive psychostimulant but have not been approved by the FDA as a weight loss aid?

#17 Dutch

Dutch

    Quit date 6/25/08

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,312 posts
  • LocationVirginia

Posted 15 August 2011 - 07:19 PM

Dude, you're now arguing with yourself. You've made two contradictory statements so I don't know how to respond. Like I said, nicotine addiction/dependence causes people to consume nicotine. Cigarettes are just one delivery system of nicotine. Do they give IQ tests to people before they put them on the board at CASAA?

Free since June 25, 2008

 


#18 Thulium

Thulium

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 178 posts

Posted 15 August 2011 - 07:27 PM

Dude, you're now arguing with yourself. You've made two contradictory statements so I don't know how to respond. Like I said, nicotine addiction/dependence causes people to consume nicotine. Cigarettes are just one delivery system of nicotine. Do they give IQ tests to people before they put them on the board at CASAA?


You can avoid the questions or answer them--your choice: If nicotine addiction causes something you say is bad (consuming nicotine), why are you blaming the victim?
Is there any reason whatsoever to believe that smoke-free products that may contain an addictive psychostimulant but have not been approved by the FDA as a smoking cessation aid pose a greater public health risk than sugar-free products that may contain an addictive psychostimulant but have not been approved by the FDA as a weight loss aid?

#19 Electricman

Electricman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 218 posts
  • LocationSpreading Electricity... in a town near you

Posted 15 August 2011 - 07:32 PM

There is something in the cigarette (the 4K other chemicals or even just inhaling smoke?) that prevented the Celiacs from rearing it's ugly head


. it is obviously NOT the nicotine - it's something else in the nasty little stinky.


I tried the e-cig, and it's helping me.



??????? How is the ecig helping if it's not the nicotine?????????? Must not take that long when vaping nicotine to affect the brain http://articles.cnn.... ... =PM:HEALTH
. http://www.facebook.com/electricmans

Nicotine, the addictive substance in tobacco products, is the most common cause of chemical dependency in the U.S., according to the CDC.

Nicotine is an extremely addictive dangerous drug . Tobacco, ecf/casaa(Consumer Addicts Should Advocate Addiction) are, in effect, drug-pushers. Their income depends on keeping millions of Americans hooked.

#20 Dutch

Dutch

    Quit date 6/25/08

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,312 posts
  • LocationVirginia

Posted 15 August 2011 - 07:33 PM

why are you blaming the victim?


Ah, I see you're at that age where you might benefit from bifocals. Where have I blamed anyone?

Free since June 25, 2008

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users